Why ships used this camouflage in World War I


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Why ships used this camouflage in World War I
Dazzle camouflage was fantastically weird. It was also surprisingly smart. WWII saw another kind of strange history unfold: a meme (yes, really). Watch our video on it here: http://bit.ly/2Co9DEu Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Dazzle camouflage was a surprisingly effective defense against torpedoes. In this episode of Vox Almanac, Phil Edwards explains why. World War I ships faced a unique problem. The u-boat was a new threat at the time, and its torpedoes were deadly. That led artist Norman Wilkinson to come up with dazzle camouflage (sometimes called “razzle dazzle camouflage”). The idea was to confuse u-boats about a ship’s course, rather than try to conceal its presence. In doing so, dazzle camouflage could keep torpedoes from hitting the boat — and that and other strategies proved a boon in World War I. This camouflage is unusual, but its striking appearance influenced the culture, inspired cubist painters’ riffs, and even entered into the world of fashion. Though dazzle camouflage lost its utility once radar and other detection techniques took over from u-boat periscopes, for a brief period in time it was an effective and unusual way to help ships stay safe. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

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This plane could cross the Atlantic in 3.5 hours. Why did it fail?

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The Concorde gave us supersonic transport. But why did this supersonic plane fail? The answer is complicated. Follow Phil Edwards and Vox Almanac on Facebook for more: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

The facial prosthetics of World War I

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Why World War I's wounded needed a sculptor. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO World War I’s horrors not only resulted in death, but severe disfigurement. When plastic surgeons were unable to heal the wounded, a unique solution came in play: sculpting. Facial prostheses in World War I were a new solution to a difficult problem, and sculptor and writer Anna Coleman Ladd led these efforts for the American Red Cross in France. She made more than 150 masks for the wounded in an effort to provide some semblance of normalcy after their severe injuries. These masks were made by making casts of the wounded faces, and then sculpting restored faces from that. Those sculptures were then used as a cast for thin copper-plated attachments, which were then attached to the wounded soldier’s face and painted. Though the process wasn’t restorative, it did provide some comfort to the wounded. That experience shaped Anna Coleman Ladd’s art as well. When she returned to America, she was willing to depict the horrors of war in her War Memorial, as well as the possibility for a new and better day ahead. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

How Norway designed a more humane prison

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There’s a better way to design prison architecture. Become a Video Lab member! http://bit.ly/video-lab Halden Prison in Norway looks sort of like a fancy dorm room or a hotel — much different than the barbed wire and cramped cells we often associate with prison design. Its look is all part of a plan to create a more humane prison, one where the architecture isn’t part of the punishment. Most prisons around the world are consolidated into one single building. This style makes it easy and efficient for inmates to move around, but the design is monotonous and full of visually unappealing materials, like steel and concrete. Plus, tight quarters inside these spaces can foster conflict. Halden has a different structure: a campus design, where inmates move from one building to another, and are surrounded by lots of windows and construction materials that help muffle noise and take advantage of natural light. The prison’s layout also encourages guards to interact with inmates face-to-face, which fosters better relationships and reduces security-related incidents. Halden’s design style is expensive — which is why we mostly see it implemented in places with good social support systems, like Western Europe and Scandinavia. Still, the design is setting new standards for what prisons could be like in the future. By Design is a new Vox video series about the intersection of design and technology, hosted by Christophe Haubursin. Check out all the By Design episodes here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NUMa0QkPzns&list=PLJ8cMiYb3G5eD0M1Bfm6lvHy5BR6hoY8X Note: The headline for this video has been updated since publishing. Previous headline: Norway is designing a more humane prison Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

Why no aquarium has a great white shark

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Many have tried to keep a white shark in captivity. Here's why that's so difficult. There are several aquariums around the world, including one in Georgia, that house whale sharks, the biggest fish in the sea. But not one has a great white shark on display. Aquariums have made dozens of attempts since the 1970s to display a captive great white shark. Most of those attempts ended with dead sharks. By the 2000s, the only group still trying was the Monterey Bay Aquarium, which spent a decade planning its white shark program. In 2004, it acquired a shark that became the first great white to survive in captivity for more than 16 days. In fact, it was on display for more than six months before it was released back into the ocean. In the following years, the Monterey Bay Aquarium hosted five more juvenile white sharks for temporary stays before ending the program in 2011. It was an expensive effort and had come under criticism due to injuries that some of the sharks developed in the tank. Responding to those critics, Jon Hoech, the aquarium's director of husbandry operations, said: "We believe strongly that putting people face to face with live animals like this is very significant in inspiring ocean conservation and connecting people to the ocean environment. We feel like white sharks face a significant threats out in the wild and our ability to bring awareness to that is significant in terms of encouraging people to become ocean stewards." Check out the video above to learn why white sharks are so difficult to keep in captivity and how the Monterey Bay Aquarium designed a program that could keep them alive. Link to the Biodiversity Heritage Library: https://www.flickr.com/photos/biodivlibrary/albums Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

How you could get away with murder in Yellowstone’s “Zone of Death"

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There's a 50 square mile section of land in Idaho where a murderer could get away scot free. Read more here: http://www.vox.com/2014/5/22/5738756/you-can-kill-someone-in-a-section-of-yellowstone-and-get-away-scot Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Why Cuban cab drivers earn more than doctors

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In Cuba, cab drivers are the one percent Help us make more ambitious videos by joining the Vox Video Lab. It gets you exclusive perks, like livestream Q&As with all the Vox creators, a badge that levels up over time, and video extras bringing you closer to our work! Learn more at http://bit.ly/video-lab Cuba’s economy works as a central planning model, where government ministries dole out resources and set everything from prices to inventories to salaries. The fact that a taxi driver can make so much more than a physician is a reflection of the Cuban government’s heavy focus on tourism. For years, the central planning apparatus has valued tourism as a key mechanism for both bringing in revenue as well as propagating the idea that Cuba is thriving. Many pesos are collected by the high prices on everything related to the tourism industry. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

The tiny island in New York City that nobody is allowed to visit

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There's a tiny island on the East River that you've probably never heard of, and you're not allowed to visit it. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Most people have probably never heard of it but there is a tiny 100 by 200 foot island on the East River in New York City called U Thant Island. It’s right below Roosevelt Island and next to the United Nations headquarters and has more history per square foot than most places in Manhattan. It’s origin dates back to the late 19th century when construction of an underground tunnel produced a tiny mound of rock that was originally named Belmont Island, after August Belmont Jr. who financed the construction project. In the intervening years it was leased by a Buddhist spiritual group, crashed into by numerous vessels, and briefly occupied by a protesting artist.

Meet the enormous boats that carry your stuff

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The largest container ship in the world launched earlier this month. It's nearly the size of four football fields. Here's how container ships got so huge and transformed the global economy. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Sources: The Box, by Marc Levinson: http://www.amazon.com/The-Box-Shipping-Container-Smaller/dp/0691136408 Eric Burniche http://www.flickr.com/photos/125006583@N05/15460454056 David AE Levy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W6lV5QR_4qk MSC via Vimeo http://vimeo.com/114546802 Maersk https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U_QChxYgYWw CaptMikeRossiter https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cHPEGzQ4_ys MINISTRO2010 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fkr_n-9-x9Q Port of Antwerp https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xtyWgPC84ss Natures Lullaby https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G9H5kzSt1yg Academic Film Archive of North America https://archive.org/details/TheSeaport Prelinger Archive https://archive.org/details/IndustryOnPa ttz_shirasawa https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC2Kbrj9L9CMDrm1cY0Dx-Lw tariqismrgrumpy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lJx9OImrLcg USArmyBigPicture https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_5lOpXdOlr8 webministriestv https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rcuKON5iFzg BM SERVICE Tenerife https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z_Cz2eFQmOE chlordk https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6zuwLVOrkiM Allison Swaim https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c2qGh9n5Mio Humberto Florez/Sea-Land Service https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ECQVohqeUu4 lyzadanger http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Fredmeyer.jpg Freddycat1 https://www.flickr.com/photos/15157516@N02/4335006028 /// Vox.com is news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

The World War II battle against STDs

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Not all of World War II’s battles were public. Venereal disease was a major front in the war. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Venereal disease has long been an issue for militaries, but during World War II, the problem became bigger and more global. That required unusual tactics and unorthodox strategies to beat syphilis and gonorrhea during the war. In this episode of Vox Almanac, Phil Edwards explores some of the ways the United States military fought this epidemic. Starting with Bousbir in Casablanca, it’s a tour of the uneasy relationship the military had with prostitution, recreational sex, and the venereal diseases that soldiers contracted. Both in America and around the world, it was a significant problem that resulted in health troubles and days lost on the battlefield. This piece uses numerous sources, but the most useful resource might be the history found here: https://collections.nlm.nih.gov/catalog/nlm:nlmuid-1278003R-mvset Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

Superblocks: How Barcelona is taking city streets back from cars

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Modern cities are designed for cars. But the city of Barcelona is testing out an urban design trick that can give cities back to pedestrians. Help us make more ambitious videos by joining the Vox Video Lab. It gets you exclusive perks, like livestream Q&As with all the Vox creators, a badge that levels up over time, and video extras bringing you closer to our work! Learn more at http://bit.ly/video-lab Read more: http://www.vox.com/2016/8/4/12342806/barcelona-superblocks Thumbnail image from http://shutterstock.com Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

It's time to draw borders on the Arctic Ocean

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Why Russia wants to own the North Pole. Follow Johnny to stay up to date: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/johnnywharris Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/johnnyharrisvox Vox Borders Episodes: 1. Haiti and the Dominican Republic ( https://youtu.be/4WvKeYuwifc) 2. The Arctic & Russia (https://youtu.be/Wx_2SVm9Jgo) 3. Japan & North Korea (https://youtu.be/qBfyIQbxXPs) 4. Mexico & Guatemala (https://youtu.be/1xbt0ACMbiA) 5. Nepal & The Himalaya (https://youtu.be/ECch2g1_6PQ) 6. Spain & Morocco (https://youtu.be/LY_Yiu2U2Ts) The ice in the Arctic is disappearing. Melting Arctic ice means new economic opportunities: trade routes in the Arctic ocean, and access to natural resources. Because of this, the Arctic nations are now moving to expand their border claims. Russia has shown that it’s the most ambitious, using a potent combination of soft power and military buildup to advance its agenda. They’ve said the Arctic is rightfully theirs. Check out more arctic maps from IBRU, Durham University, UK: http://www.durham.ac.uk/ibru/resources/arctic / Vox Borders is a new international documentary series presented by Emmy-nominated videojournalist Johnny Harris. For this series, Johnny is producing six 10-15 minute documentaries about different borders stories from around the world.

Why Elon Musk says we're living in a simulation

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You may like playing The Sims, but Elon Musk says you are the Sim. Help us make more ambitious videos by joining the Vox Video Lab. It gets you exclusive perks, like livestream Q&As with all the Vox creators, a badge that levels up over time, and video extras bringing you closer to our work! Learn more at http://bit.ly/video-lab Check out the full cartoon by Alvin Chang: http://www.vox.com/technology/2016/6/23/12007694/elon-musk-simulation-cartoon Elon Musk thinks we are living in a simulated reality. Nick Bostrom think those chances are more around 20 percent. The chances of human kind participating in a simulated reality is broken down into three options: 1) humans go extinct before we are able to run a simulation of this size. 2) Humans are uninterested in running ancestor simulations. 3) We are currently participating in the simulation. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

2016 Olympics: What Rio doesn’t want the world to see

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Rio is hiding poor people. See Part II: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c3BRTlHFpBU Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO The 2016 Olympics are set to begin in just over a month in Rio de Janeiro. As the city prepares to receive an influx of international visitors, it is building new infrastructure and transportation systems to accommodate the surge. But the city is also undergoing another major project: hiding and removing poor people from view of foreign onlookers. I went to Rio to see how the city is transforming to make way for the Olympics Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Why old buildings use the same leaf design

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There’s a reason almost every column has the same leaves… Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Follow Phil Edwards on Facebook here: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ In this episode of Vox Almanac, Phil Edwards explores why columns look the way they do — in particular, the leave-strewn Corinthian columns you’ll often see on buildings (both old and new). These leaves actually have an originating myth courtesy of the writer Vitruvius, crediting Callimachus for the Corinthian column design. The acanthus leaves on the column have remained consistent over millennia, and, over time, have come to represent more than just a sturdy plant. They’re on display in this video at the National Arboretum, where columns that used to sit on the United States Capitol have been relocated. These striking columns aren’t just a historical record — they’re a symbol of how Corinthian design and acanthus leaves manage to endure over time. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

7 ways a trip to Mars could kill you

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What exactly makes a journey to Mars so perilous? Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

It's not you. Bad doors are everywhere.

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This video is about doors. Joe Posner investigates, with some help from 99% invisible, a wonderful podcast. Check them out here: http://www.99pi.org Subscribe to our channel here: http://goo.gl/0bsAjO There's a door on the 10th floor in the Vox Media office I hate so much. You probably know one of these too. But it's not our fault. And luckily, Roman Mars of 99% Invisible magically arrived in my cellphone to send me on a cross-country journey to find out the incredible surprises behind this common complaint: Don Norman started complaining about doors over 25 years ago. Doors shouldn't need instructions – the shape of them can guide you through just fine. So why do so many doors need instruction manuals right on the side of them? When most people complain about something, nothing happens. Don Norman is not most people – he's a psychologist and cognitive scientist. Don Norman thought about, and wrote about his complaints so incredibly thoroughly that he changed the world. 99% Invisible's Roman Mars helps tell the story. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. 99% Invisible is a member of http://Radiotopia.fm Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

The most technologically advanced cruise ship in the world - Top Shelf

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Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=theverge We spent a weekend on the most futuristic cruise ship out there, Quantum of the Seas. There are robot bartenders, a skydiving simulator, bumper cars, trapezes, an ice skating rink, and the North Star, which lifts you 300 feet above sea level to give you a view of the sea and the ship you've never seen before. Check out our full video catalog: http://www.youtube.com/theverge/videos Visit our playlists: http://www.youtube.com/theverge/playlists Like The Verge on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/verge Follow on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/verge Follow on Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/verge Read More: http://www.theverge.com

Why China is building islands in the South China Sea

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China claims they aren't military bases, but their actions say otherwise. Help us make more ambitious videos by joining the Vox Video Lab. It gets you exclusive perks, like livestream Q&As with all the Vox creators, a badge that levels up over time, and video extras bringing you closer to our work! Learn more at http://bit.ly/video-lab China is building islands in the South China sea and its causing disputes among the other nations in the region; Malaysia, the Philippines, Brunei, Vietnam, and Indonesia. The US has many allies in the region and uses its massive Navy to patrol international waters, keeping shipping lanes open for trade To truly understand the international conflicts and trends shaping our world you need a big-picture view. Video journalist Sam Ellis uses maps to tell these stories and chart their effects on foreign policy. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Why monks had that haircut

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There was a lot of thought behind the style — and controversy. Become a member of the Vox Video Lab! http://bit.ly/video-lab Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO What was the deal with that monk haircut? In this episode of Vox Almanac, Phil Edwards explores the history and controversy behind the style. Known as "tonsure," the typical monk hairstyle has many variations throughout religions. The particular hairstyle worn by Christian monks has its own variations and controversies as well. Three different types of tonsure were popular: a coronal tonsure, a Pauline tonsure, and a third Celtic tonsure that came to represent the differences between the Roman Catholic and Celtic Catholic church. The winding path of this tonsure is a new way to look at the division within the religion and the unpredictable ways something like hair can represent faith. Support our work and get a peek behind the scenes at Vox by joining the Vox Video Lab, our members community on YouTube. Not only will you help us create bigger and better explainer videos, you’ll get a ton of cool perks and access to your favorite Vox creators too. Sign-ups start at $4.99 a month. Learn more at https://www.vox.com/join. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

The bizarre physics of fire ants

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They're not just an animal, they're a material. And that's got engineers interested. // Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO For more information about the Hu lab: http://www.hu.gatech.edu/ Red imported fire ants (solenopsis invicta) are native to South America and an invasive species in the United States. One of the adaptations that makes them so hardy is that they can build large structures by linking their bodies together. This is how they form rafts that can float during floods. When they're aggregated together, fire ants can be seen as a material and the Hu lab at Georgia Tech has been testing that material for years. /// Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Why people never smiled in old photos

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Early portraits looked pretty grim. A lot of old photos from the 19th and early 20th century are fraught with doom and gloom—and on the occasion the literal dead face. That led to the popular belief that people just did not smile in old photographs. The common explanation is due to the limited technology at the time to capture a smile. Exposure times were long and the thinking was it's easier to hold a serious expression over a long period. Another theory included early photography being heavily influenced by painting (which meant no smiling). Read more on why photographs were sans smiles at: http://www.vox.com/2015/4/8/8365997/smile-old-photographs Video by Phil Edwards and Gina Barton. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

How this military explosive is poisoning American soil

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The bomb that went off twice: https://features.propublica.org/bombs-in-our-backyard/military-pollution-rdx-bombs-holston-cornhusker/ In our latest ProPublica collaboration, we report on RDX, one of the world’s most powerful conventional explosives developed by the U.S. military. But it’s now believed by many to cause cancer, and is increasingly turning up in drinking water supplies near military sites across the country. Check out the full ProPublica piece at https://features.propublica.org/bombs-in-our-backyard/military-pollution-rdx-bombs-holston-cornhusker/ for the in-depth reporting, and stay tuned for more stories in this collaboration! If you'd like to sign up to receive more ProPublica journalism, go here: http://propub.li/2hwf4V9 . . . Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

10 Biggest Ships In The World

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10 Biggest Ships In The World ► Subscribe: https://goo.gl/vHN6qB For copyright matters please contact us at: miniminter1992.29@gmail.com Some of the largest ships in the world are so giant that you can’t even grasp how big really are. Cruise ships, tankers, aircraft carriers… they’re so massive that they are comparable to the world’s tallest buildings if they were on their sides, such as the Empire State Building, the Sears Tower, the Burj Khalifa, and the Petronas Towers. Many people think the Titanic was one of the biggest ships in history, but despite its name, the Titanic is tiny compared to today’s largest ships. Let’s take a look at ten of the most insane largest boats in the world today. #ship #boat #biggest

Would you use time travel to kill baby Hitler?

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Well? Would you? Vox's Phil Edwards asked author James Gleick about the history of this unusual philosophical question. Follow Phil Edwards and Vox Almanac on Facebook for more: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

The video the Illuminati doesn’t want you to see

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Find more background here: http://www.vox.com/2015/5/19/8624675/what-is-the-real-illuminati Vox's Phil Edwards investigates the real Δ. The Illuminati is fascinating, but is it real? This is the history of the real group, including everything from the Freemasons to Dan Brown. If you've heard about the group, you've probably wondered: what is the real illuminati? Conspiracy theories like "illuminati confirmed" have confused the issue, so here are the illuminati facts about the history of the group. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

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