Why babies in medieval paintings look like ugly old men


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Why babies in medieval paintings look like ugly old men
Why are the babies in medieval art so ugly? Phil Edwards dug a little to find out: http://www.vox.com/2015/7/8/8908825/ugly-medieval-babies Follow Phil Edwards and Vox Almanac on Facebook for more: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

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Why knights fought snails in medieval art

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Look in the margins of medieval books and you'll find an unusual theme: knights vs. snails. Follow Phil Edwards and Vox Almanac on Facebook for more: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ Lillian Randall's paper is here: https://www.scribd.com/document/263159779/The-Snail-in-Gothic-Marginal-Warfare And Michael Camille's book about marginal art can be found here: http://www.reaktionbooks.co.uk/display.asp?K=9780948462283 http://press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/distributed/I/bo3536323.html Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Medieval snails and knights — who knew? It turns out that medieval illuminated manuscripts featured a lot of bizarre imagery in the margins, but this pocket of art history might be one of the most intriguing. Scholar Lilian Randall provides the best theory for the unusual motif: these medieval knights fought snails in the margins because snails represented the Lombards, who had become widely despised lenders throughout Europe. Snail was an insult and, over time, it became a type of meme detached from its original meaning. Of course, like much of art history, this theory is just a theory. But it gives us an insight into the rich culture of marginal art and all the complexity, confusion, and amusement that sits on the side of the page. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

The facial prosthetics of World War I

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Why World War I's wounded needed a sculptor. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO World War I’s horrors not only resulted in death, but severe disfigurement. When plastic surgeons were unable to heal the wounded, a unique solution came in play: sculpting. Facial prostheses in World War I were a new solution to a difficult problem, and sculptor and writer Anna Coleman Ladd led these efforts for the American Red Cross in France. She made more than 150 masks for the wounded in an effort to provide some semblance of normalcy after their severe injuries. These masks were made by making casts of the wounded faces, and then sculpting restored faces from that. Those sculptures were then used as a cast for thin copper-plated attachments, which were then attached to the wounded soldier’s face and painted. Though the process wasn’t restorative, it did provide some comfort to the wounded. That experience shaped Anna Coleman Ladd’s art as well. When she returned to America, she was willing to depict the horrors of war in her War Memorial, as well as the possibility for a new and better day ahead. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

The myth of Cupid and Psyche - Brendan Pelsue

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Check out TED-Ed's Patreon page! https://www.patreon.com/teded View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-myth-of-cupid-and-psyche-brendan-pelsue Psyche was born so beautiful that she was worshipped as a new incarnation of Venus, the goddess of love. But human lovers were too intimidated to approach her, and Apollo recommended her father abandon her on a crag where she would marry “a cruel and savage, serpent-like winged evil.” But Psyche’s story ended up being much more interesting. Brendan Pelsue shares the myth of Cupid and Psyche. Lesson by Brendan Pelsue, directed by TED-Ed.

The dollhouses of death that changed forensic science

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Frances Glessner Lee created dollhouses with dead dolls. In this episode of Vox Almanac, Vox's Phil Edwards explains why. Help us make more ambitious videos by joining the Vox Video Lab. It gets you exclusive perks, like livestream Q&As with all the Vox creators, a badge that levels up over time, and video extras bringing you closer to our work! Learn more at http://bit.ly/video-lab Follow Phil Edwards on Facebook here: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ Frances Glessner Lee's "Nutshell Studies of Unexplained Death" are part of a new exhibit at the Renwick Gallery of the Smithsonian Art museum. The collection is part art, part science, and part creepy peek into the world of forensic science. These miniatures significantly advanced forensics and forensic science, but they aren't just CSI curios - they're complex, confounding works of art that manage to be morbid and beautiful at the same time. Lee's legacy bridges both the art world and the world of crime — and you'll get a chance to see exactly how her nutshell studies work. These aren't just dollhouses — they're entire worlds worth exploring. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

How obsessive artists colorize old photos

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Photo colorization artists use a combination of research, physics, and technology to digitally reconstruct history's black and white record. Help us make more ambitious videos by joining the Vox Video Lab. It gets you exclusive perks, like livestream Q&As with all the Vox creators, a badge that levels up over time, and video extras bringing you closer to our work! Learn more at http://bit.ly/video-lab Artist links: Jordan Lloyd (@jordanjlloydhq): http://dynamichrome.com/ Mads Madsen (@Madsmadsench): http://www.colorized-history.com/ Marina Amaral (@marinamaral2): http://www.marinamaral.com/ Dana Keller (@HistoryInColor): http://www.danarkeller.com/ Patty Allison (@imbuedwithhues): https://imbuedwithhues.wordpress.com/ The Paper Time Machine: https://unbound.com/books/paper-time-machine Photo colorization isn’t just coloring within the lines — it requires meticulous research to make sure that every detail is historically accurate. The color of military uniforms, signs, vehicles, and world fashion spanning decades needs to be accounted for before even opening digital software like Photoshop. That means digging through sources like diaries, government records, old advertisements, and even consulting historical experts to get the colors right. But even after the arduous research, restoration, and blending of color, the image still isn’t finished. In order to achieve true photorealism, the physics of how light works in the atmosphere needs to be taken into account. Colors look different depending on the lighting conditions when the photo was taken, so artists rely on shadows and the location of light to make an educated guess about the time of day in a black-and-white photo. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Why is Vermeer's "Girl with the Pearl Earring" considered a masterpiece? - James Earle

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View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/why-is-vermeer-s-girl-with-the-pearl-earring-considered-a-masterpiece-james-earle Is she turning towards you or away from you? No one can agree. She’s the subject of Dutch Master Johannes Vermeer’s "Girl with the Pearl Earring," a painting often referred to as the ‘Mona Lisa of the North.’ But what makes this painting so captivating? James Earle explains how this work represents the birth of a modern perspective on economics, politics, and love. Lesson by James Earle, animation by Tess Martin.

Why danger symbols can’t last forever

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How to design fear, explained with 99% Invisible. Check them out here: http://99pi.org Correction: The correct spelling of “warning” in Persian is هشدار. Watch the previous episode from this series: http://bit.ly/2DDIQAL Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Chances are you wouldn’t be able to recognize a biohazard even if you were looking right at one. But the biohazard symbol? It’s pretty easy to spot. Most warning icons rely on previously established objects or symbols: a general caution might use an exclamation point, and a fire warning might use an illustration of a flame. But the biohazard symbol references an idea that is much harder to picture — and in the 50 years since its invention, it has become one of the most recognizable icons on the planet. But can the meaning of a symbol like this last an eternity? A special Department of Energy project is trying to figure that out. Read more: https://goo.gl/U82Ehn This video was made in partnership with 99% Invisible, a podcast about all the thought that goes into the things we don’t think about, hosted by Roman Mars. You can find full episodes at http://99pi.org Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Meet the designer cats with wild blood

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Bengals, Savannahs, and Toygers, explained. Help us make more ambitious videos by joining the Vox Video Lab. It gets you exclusive perks, like livestream Q&As with all the Vox creators, a badge that levels up over time, and video extras bringing you closer to our work! Learn more at http://bit.ly/video-lab Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. By breeding house cats with wild animals, humans developed hybrid cats that look like little leopards. Bengal cats are a breed that was developed by breeding domestic cats with asian leopard cats. The first American bengal breeder is a woman named Jean Mill, but her work has continued through other breeders. We met one of those breeders, Anthony Hutcherson, when we went to film the cats at the Westminster Dog Show. Besides bengals, we also saw another hybrid breed: savannahs. Instead of asian leopard cats, savannahs were developed by breeding house cats with servals. Unlike the other two breeds, the last breed we met, toygers, are not hybrid cats. Breeder Judy Sugden created the breed by carefully breeding domestic cats with qualities that resemble wild tigers. To learn more about the cats and the breeders that made possible, watch the video above. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Giving birth costs a lot. Hospitals won't tell you how much.

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I tried to find out how much my son’s birth would cost before it happened. I failed. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Childbirth is a really common procedure in the US. Around 4 million women will go to a hospital this year. And most births are relatively uncomplicated. But even for the most common medical procedure in the US, the price for labor and delivery is almost impossible to find out before it happens. I decided to try it out--to see if I could get a number of how much my wife's birth would cost before it happened. This video is the story of what happened. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

The World War II battle against STDs

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Not all of World War II’s battles were public. Venereal disease was a major front in the war. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Venereal disease has long been an issue for militaries, but during World War II, the problem became bigger and more global. That required unusual tactics and unorthodox strategies to beat syphilis and gonorrhea during the war. In this episode of Vox Almanac, Phil Edwards explores some of the ways the United States military fought this epidemic. Starting with Bousbir in Casablanca, it’s a tour of the uneasy relationship the military had with prostitution, recreational sex, and the venereal diseases that soldiers contracted. Both in America and around the world, it was a significant problem that resulted in health troubles and days lost on the battlefield. This piece uses numerous sources, but the most useful resource might be the history found here: https://collections.nlm.nih.gov/catalog/nlm:nlmuid-1278003R-mvset Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

The tiny island in New York City that nobody is allowed to visit

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There's a tiny island on the East River that you've probably never heard of, and you're not allowed to visit it. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Most people have probably never heard of it but there is a tiny 100 by 200 foot island on the East River in New York City called U Thant Island. It’s right below Roosevelt Island and next to the United Nations headquarters and has more history per square foot than most places in Manhattan. It’s origin dates back to the late 19th century when construction of an underground tunnel produced a tiny mound of rock that was originally named Belmont Island, after August Belmont Jr. who financed the construction project. In the intervening years it was leased by a Buddhist spiritual group, crashed into by numerous vessels, and briefly occupied by a protesting artist.

Why people never smiled in old photos

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Early portraits looked pretty grim. A lot of old photos from the 19th and early 20th century are fraught with doom and gloom—and on the occasion the literal dead face. That led to the popular belief that people just did not smile in old photographs. The common explanation is due to the limited technology at the time to capture a smile. Exposure times were long and the thinking was it's easier to hold a serious expression over a long period. Another theory included early photography being heavily influenced by painting (which meant no smiling). Read more on why photographs were sans smiles at: http://www.vox.com/2015/4/8/8365997/smile-old-photographs Video by Phil Edwards and Gina Barton. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Why cartoon characters curse like this

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How these @*#%!$ things became a symbol for cursing. Help us make more ambitious videos by joining the Vox Video Lab. It gets you exclusive perks, like livestream Q&As with all the Vox creators, a badge that levels up over time, and video extras bringing you closer to our work! Learn more at http://bit.ly/video-lab Check out Language Log for more stuff like this: http://languagelog.ldc.upenn.edu/nll/ In this episode of Vox Almanac, Vox’s Phil Edwards explores the big @!#*$ deal with using symbols for curses. Known as the “grawlix” — a term invented by Beetle Bailey cartoonist Mort Walker — this string of symbols is almost as old as comics, extending back to the early 1900s. Comics like The Katzenjammer Kids and Lady Bountiful were truly inventing the art form and, in the process, had to figure out a way to show obscenities to kids. Enter #*@!$ like this. The grawlix performs a censorship function while, at the same time, revealing that something naughty is going on. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

Anatomy of a makeover movie

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Have you ever wondered why you love makeover movies so much? We broke down the best moments that happen in almost every makeover movie for you: http://www.vox.com/2015/6/29/8861989/anatomy-of-a-makeover-movie Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Would you use time travel to kill baby Hitler?

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Well? Would you? Vox's Phil Edwards asked author James Gleick about the history of this unusual philosophical question. Follow Phil Edwards and Vox Almanac on Facebook for more: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

How the Mona Lisa became so overrated

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It's not just the smile. There are a few real reasons Mona is so famous. Vox's Phil Edwards looked into it... Follow Phil Edwards and Vox Almanac on Facebook for more: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ Read the full article for citations and details here: http://www.vox.com/2016/9/20/12941736/mona-lisa-famous Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Why monks had that haircut

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There was a lot of thought behind the style — and controversy. Become a member of the Vox Video Lab! http://bit.ly/video-lab Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO What was the deal with that monk haircut? In this episode of Vox Almanac, Phil Edwards explores the history and controversy behind the style. Known as "tonsure," the typical monk hairstyle has many variations throughout religions. The particular hairstyle worn by Christian monks has its own variations and controversies as well. Three different types of tonsure were popular: a coronal tonsure, a Pauline tonsure, and a third Celtic tonsure that came to represent the differences between the Roman Catholic and Celtic Catholic church. The winding path of this tonsure is a new way to look at the division within the religion and the unpredictable ways something like hair can represent faith. Support our work and get a peek behind the scenes at Vox by joining the Vox Video Lab, our members community on YouTube. Not only will you help us create bigger and better explainer videos, you’ll get a ton of cool perks and access to your favorite Vox creators too. Sign-ups start at $4.99 a month. Learn more at https://www.vox.com/join. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

It's not you. Bad doors are everywhere.

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This video is about doors. Joe Posner investigates, with some help from 99% invisible, a wonderful podcast. Check them out here: http://www.99pi.org Subscribe to our channel here: http://goo.gl/0bsAjO There's a door on the 10th floor in the Vox Media office I hate so much. You probably know one of these too. But it's not our fault. And luckily, Roman Mars of 99% Invisible magically arrived in my cellphone to send me on a cross-country journey to find out the incredible surprises behind this common complaint: Don Norman started complaining about doors over 25 years ago. Doors shouldn't need instructions – the shape of them can guide you through just fine. So why do so many doors need instruction manuals right on the side of them? When most people complain about something, nothing happens. Don Norman is not most people – he's a psychologist and cognitive scientist. Don Norman thought about, and wrote about his complaints so incredibly thoroughly that he changed the world. 99% Invisible's Roman Mars helps tell the story. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. 99% Invisible is a member of http://Radiotopia.fm Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Why women’s clothing sizes don’t make sense

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Women's clothing sizes are very inconsistent. So no, it's not you. It's the women’s clothing industry. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

The World War II meme that circled the world

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Kilroy was here — those three words showed up in a lot of surprising places. Follow Phil Edwards and Vox Almanac on Facebook for more: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ We know about the epic drama of World War II, but what about the jokes? The above video tells the story (as best as we can). The iconic piece of graffiti that was known, in America, as "Kilroy Was Here" traveled the world in a fashion remarkably similar to a modern meme. Read some more background here: http://www.vox.com/2015/12/11/9886246/kilroy-was-here Sounds via RiverNile7, Daemeon1427, and JasonElrod, found at Freesound.org. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Why Do Disney Princesses All Look Like Babies?

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Thanks to Wix for supporting PBS Digital Studios. To learn more: https://Wix.com/go/OKAY Help us out and complete the 2018 PBS Digital Studios survey! https://to.pbs.org/2018YTSurvey ↓↓↓ More info and sources below ↓↓↓ I noticed something weird about Disney Princesses lately. Naturally, I had to examine it through the lens of science. The answer led me to new knowledge about human development, the domestication and taming of animals, and why we find things cute in the first place. You’ll never look at cartoons the same way again Siberian silver fox footage courtesy of Lee Alan Dugatkin and Lyudmila Trut. Check out their book “How to Tame a Fox (and Build a Dog)” to learn more, it’s great! https://press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/H/bo25568406.html Skull reproductions courtesy of Boneclones: https://boneclones.com/ REFERENCES: Gould, Stephen Jay “Biological Homage to Mickey Mouse” https://faculty.uca.edu/benw/biol4415/papers/Mickey.pdf Bogin, B. (1990). The evolution of human childhood. Bioscience, 40(1), 16-25. PDF: http://bit.ly/2vDb3Vy Somel, M., Franz, H., Yan, Z., Lorenc, A., Guo, S., Giger, T., ... & Webster, M. J. (2009). Transcriptional neoteny in the human brain. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 106(14), 5743-5748. ----------- FOLLOW US: Twitter: @DrJoeHanson @okaytobesmart Instagram: @DrJoeHanson Merch: https://store.dftba.com/collections/its-okay-to-be-smart Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/itsokaytobesmart SEND US STUFF: It’s Okay To Be Smart PO Box 303356 Austin, TX 78703 USA BOOKS WE’VE FEATURED: http://smart-books.tumblr.com/ ----------- It’s Okay To Be Smart is hosted by Joe Hanson, Ph.D. Director: Andrew Matthews Writer: Andrew Matthews Creative Director: David Schulte Editor/animator: Derek Borsheim Producers: Stephanie Noone and Amanda Fox Produced by PBS Digital Studios Music via APM Stock images from Shutterstock http://www.shutterstock.com

Why the Victorian mansion is a horror icon

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The Gilded Age left a legacy of decay on the American landscape. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Haunted houses are often depicted with similar features: decaying woodwork, steep angles, and Gothic-looking towers and turrets. The model for this trope is the Victorian mansion, once a symbol of affluence and taste during the Gilded Age - a period of American history marked by political corruption and severe income inequality. After World War I, these houses were seen as extravagant and antiquated, and were abandoned. Their sinister relationship to the troubling end of the Victorian Era in America eventually led to their depiction as haunted and ghostly in both fine art and pop culture, and is now an unspoken symbol of dread. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

The R-rated Oregon Trail

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The Oregon Trail was a great game — but there were some things they couldn't teach kids. This is the bloody, sexy, drunken trail. Follow Phil Edwards and Vox Almanac on Facebook for more: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ For more about the sources, read the full article: http://www.vox.com/2016/3/3/11152436/r-rated-oregon-trail We all loved The Oregon Trail as kids — and the gameplay was pretty accurate. But there were a few things about pioneer life that weren't fit for that precious hour in the computer room. Some images in this video come from Shutterstock: http://shutterstock.com You can play the game here: https://archive.org/details/msdos_Oregon_Trail_The_1990 Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Why no aquarium has a great white shark

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Many have tried to keep a white shark in captivity. Here's why that's so difficult. There are several aquariums around the world, including one in Georgia, that house whale sharks, the biggest fish in the sea. But not one has a great white shark on display. Aquariums have made dozens of attempts since the 1970s to display a captive great white shark. Most of those attempts ended with dead sharks. By the 2000s, the only group still trying was the Monterey Bay Aquarium, which spent a decade planning its white shark program. In 2004, it acquired a shark that became the first great white to survive in captivity for more than 16 days. In fact, it was on display for more than six months before it was released back into the ocean. In the following years, the Monterey Bay Aquarium hosted five more juvenile white sharks for temporary stays before ending the program in 2011. It was an expensive effort and had come under criticism due to injuries that some of the sharks developed in the tank. Responding to those critics, Jon Hoech, the aquarium's director of husbandry operations, said: "We believe strongly that putting people face to face with live animals like this is very significant in inspiring ocean conservation and connecting people to the ocean environment. We feel like white sharks face a significant threats out in the wild and our ability to bring awareness to that is significant in terms of encouraging people to become ocean stewards." Check out the video above to learn why white sharks are so difficult to keep in captivity and how the Monterey Bay Aquarium designed a program that could keep them alive. Link to the Biodiversity Heritage Library: https://www.flickr.com/photos/biodivlibrary/albums Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

China's panda diplomacy, explained

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China's best diplomats are the ones that sit around and eat bamboo all day. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. China has given pandas to foreign powers long before the 20th century, but the most current iteration of panda diplomacy began in the 1950s with its gifting of Ping Ping and An An to the Soviet Union. Today, pandas are no longer gifted, but rather loaned to other countries, particularly those with which China wants to develop and strengthen relations. Not only are pandas an iconic symbol of China and its culture, they also act as diplomats in China’s global political strategy. Check out the original article here: http://www.vox.com/2014/5/23/5742002/panda-diplomacy-china-soft-power-kathleen-buckingham-malaysia-panda-loan Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

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