Why babies in medieval paintings look like ugly old men


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Why babies in medieval paintings look like ugly old men
Why are the babies in medieval art so ugly? Phil Edwards dug a little to find out: http://www.vox.com/2015/7/8/8908825/ugly-medieval-babies Follow Phil Edwards and Vox Almanac on Facebook for more: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

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The facial prosthetics of World War I

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Why World War I's wounded needed a sculptor. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO World War I’s horrors not only resulted in death, but severe disfigurement. When plastic surgeons were unable to heal the wounded, a unique solution came in play: sculpting. Facial prostheses in World War I were a new solution to a difficult problem, and sculptor and writer Anna Coleman Ladd led these efforts for the American Red Cross in France. She made more than 150 masks for the wounded in an effort to provide some semblance of normalcy after their severe injuries. These masks were made by making casts of the wounded faces, and then sculpting restored faces from that. Those sculptures were then used as a cast for thin copper-plated attachments, which were then attached to the wounded soldier’s face and painted. Though the process wasn’t restorative, it did provide some comfort to the wounded. That experience shaped Anna Coleman Ladd’s art as well. When she returned to America, she was willing to depict the horrors of war in her War Memorial, as well as the possibility for a new and better day ahead. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

Why no aquarium has a great white shark

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Many have tried to keep a white shark in captivity. Here's why that's so difficult. There are several aquariums around the world, including one in Georgia, that house whale sharks, the biggest fish in the sea. But not one has a great white shark on display. Aquariums have made dozens of attempts since the 1970s to display a captive great white shark. Most of those attempts ended with dead sharks. By the 2000s, the only group still trying was the Monterey Bay Aquarium, which spent a decade planning its white shark program. In 2004, it acquired a shark that became the first great white to survive in captivity for more than 16 days. In fact, it was on display for more than six months before it was released back into the ocean. In the following years, the Monterey Bay Aquarium hosted five more juvenile white sharks for temporary stays before ending the program in 2011. It was an expensive effort and had come under criticism due to injuries that some of the sharks developed in the tank. Responding to those critics, Jon Hoech, the aquarium's director of husbandry operations, said: "We believe strongly that putting people face to face with live animals like this is very significant in inspiring ocean conservation and connecting people to the ocean environment. We feel like white sharks face a significant threats out in the wild and our ability to bring awareness to that is significant in terms of encouraging people to become ocean stewards." Check out the video above to learn why white sharks are so difficult to keep in captivity and how the Monterey Bay Aquarium designed a program that could keep them alive. Link to the Biodiversity Heritage Library: https://www.flickr.com/photos/biodivlibrary/albums Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

How Illegal Items Are Found And Destroyed At JFK Airport

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At NYC's John F. Kennedy Airport, 1,000 bags an hour are checked for narcotics and illicit food. Customs and Border Patrol officials are tasked with stopping these goods from entering the United States. MORE AIRPORT CONTENT: How Emirates Makes 225,000 In-Flight Meals A Day https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4wkvaEM4bIg What It's Like On The Longest Flight In The World On Singapore Airlines https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tanqrySJ5Ng What Happened To Donald Trump’s $365 Million Airline? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wKUpyUm3PGs ------------------------------------------------------ #Airport #Security #BusinessInsider Business Insider tells you all you need to know about business, finance, tech, retail, and more. Visit us at: https://www.businessinsider.com Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/user/businessinsider BI on Facebook: https://read.bi/2xOcEcj BI on Instagram: https://read.bi/2Q2D29T BI on Twitter: https://read.bi/2xCnzGF BI on Amazon Prime: http://read.bi/PrimeVideo How Illegal Items Are Found And Destroyed At JFK Airport

Why people never smiled in old photos

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Early portraits looked pretty grim. A lot of old photos from the 19th and early 20th century are fraught with doom and gloom—and on the occasion the literal dead face. That led to the popular belief that people just did not smile in old photographs. The common explanation is due to the limited technology at the time to capture a smile. Exposure times were long and the thinking was it's easier to hold a serious expression over a long period. Another theory included early photography being heavily influenced by painting (which meant no smiling). Read more on why photographs were sans smiles at: http://www.vox.com/2015/4/8/8365997/smile-old-photographs Video by Phil Edwards and Gina Barton. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

The dollhouses of death that changed forensic science

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Frances Glessner Lee created dollhouses with dead dolls. In this episode of Vox Almanac, Vox's Phil Edwards explains why. Help us make more ambitious videos by joining the Vox Video Lab. It gets you exclusive perks, like livestream Q&As with all the Vox creators, a badge that levels up over time, and video extras bringing you closer to our work! Learn more at http://bit.ly/video-lab Follow Phil Edwards on Facebook here: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ Frances Glessner Lee's "Nutshell Studies of Unexplained Death" are part of a new exhibit at the Renwick Gallery of the Smithsonian Art museum. The collection is part art, part science, and part creepy peek into the world of forensic science. These miniatures significantly advanced forensics and forensic science, but they aren't just CSI curios - they're complex, confounding works of art that manage to be morbid and beautiful at the same time. Lee's legacy bridges both the art world and the world of crime — and you'll get a chance to see exactly how her nutshell studies work. These aren't just dollhouses — they're entire worlds worth exploring. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Jurassic Park was ahead of its time. Jurassic World is not.

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A lot has changed in paleontology since Jurassic Park first came out in 1993. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO For more information about this topic: National Geographic: A Velociraptor Without Feathers Isn’t a Velociraptor http://phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2013/03/20/a-velociraptor-without-feathers-isnt-a-velociraptor/ The Guardian: Siberian dinosaur spreads feathers around the dinosaur tree http://www.theguardian.com/science/lost-worlds/2014/jul/24/kulindadromeus-feathers-dinosaur-birds-evolution-siberia-russia Science Mag: Earliest dinosaurs may have sported feathers http://news.sciencemag.org/evolution/2014/07/earliest-dinosaurs-may-have-sported-feathers Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

5 Brits Take A DNA Test

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We took a DNA test to find out our ancestry. Many of us have an idea of where we came from, but we wanted to see how much we really know about our family history. 23andMe's DNA testing kit gives you a detailed breakdown of your DNA makeup, sometimes even detailing the region of each country your family came from. The results were pretty surprising. MORE SCIENCE CONTENT: How Many Children Can A Human Have In A Lifetime? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7yrZYBE81H8 Why Some Men Can't Grow Beards https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aukTxMq-VwU What Happens When You Drink Too Much Water https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cDCEGMjbNug ------------------------------------------------------ #DNA #Ancestry #INSIDER INSIDER is great journalism about what passionate people actually want to know. That’s everything from news to food, celebrity to science, politics to sports and all the rest. It’s smart. It’s fearless. It’s fun. We push the boundaries of digital storytelling. Our mission is to inform and inspire. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: https://insder.co/2NCg6Sg INSIDER on Facebook: https://insder.co/2NyYczE INSIDER on Instagram: https://insder.co/2xN5qFB INSIDER on Twitter: https://insder.co/2xyN5wE INSIDER on Snapchat: https://insder.co/2KJLtVo 5 Brits Take A DNA Test

A day in the life of an ancient Egyptian doctor - Elizabeth Cox

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Check out our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/teded View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/a-day-in-the-life-of-an-ancient-egyptian-doctor-elizabeth-cox It’s another sweltering morning in Memphis, Egypt. As the sunlight brightens the Nile, Peseshet checks her supplies. Honey, garlic, cumin, acacia leaves, cedar oil -- she’s well stocked with the essentials she needs to treat her patients. Elizabeth Cox outlines a day in the life of an ancient Egyptian doctor. Lesson by Elizabeth Cox, animation by Echo Bridge. Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! Justin Carpani, Faiza Imtiaz, Khalifa Alhulail, Tejas Dc, Benjamin & Shannon Pinder, Srikote Naewchampa, Ex Foedus, Sage Curie, Exal Enrique Cisneros Tuch, Ana Maria, Vignan Velivela, Ibel Wong, Ahmad Hyari, eden sher, Travis Wehrman, Louisa Lee, Kiara Taylor, Hoang Viet, Nathan A. Wright, Jast3r, Аркадий Скайуокер, Milad Mostafavi, Rob Johnson, Ashley Maldonado, Clarence E. Harper Jr., Bojana Golubovic, Mihail Radu Pantilimon, Benedict Chuah, Karthik Cherala, haventfiguredout , Violeta Cervantes, Elaine Fitzpatrick, Lyn-z Schulte, cnorahs, Henrique 'Sorín' Cassús, Tim Robinson, Jun Cai, Paul Schneider, Amber Wood, Ophelia Gibson Best, Cas Jamieson, Michelle Stevens-Stanford, Phyllis Dubrow, Andreas Voltios, and Eunsun Kim.

How saber-toothed cats grew their mouth swords

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New research takes us inside the teeth of these extinct killing machines. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO This video was made possible in part by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

China's panda diplomacy, explained

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China's best diplomats are the ones that sit around and eat bamboo all day. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. China has given pandas to foreign powers long before the 20th century, but the most current iteration of panda diplomacy began in the 1950s with its gifting of Ping Ping and An An to the Soviet Union. Today, pandas are no longer gifted, but rather loaned to other countries, particularly those with which China wants to develop and strengthen relations. Not only are pandas an iconic symbol of China and its culture, they also act as diplomats in China’s global political strategy. Check out the original article here: http://www.vox.com/2014/5/23/5742002/panda-diplomacy-china-soft-power-kathleen-buckingham-malaysia-panda-loan Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

The tiny island in New York City that nobody is allowed to visit

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There's a tiny island on the East River that you've probably never heard of, and you're not allowed to visit it. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Most people have probably never heard of it but there is a tiny 100 by 200 foot island on the East River in New York City called U Thant Island. It’s right below Roosevelt Island and next to the United Nations headquarters and has more history per square foot than most places in Manhattan. It’s origin dates back to the late 19th century when construction of an underground tunnel produced a tiny mound of rock that was originally named Belmont Island, after August Belmont Jr. who financed the construction project. In the intervening years it was leased by a Buddhist spiritual group, crashed into by numerous vessels, and briefly occupied by a protesting artist.

Why monks had that haircut

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There was a lot of thought behind the style — and controversy. Become a member of the Vox Video Lab! http://bit.ly/video-lab Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO What was the deal with that monk haircut? In this episode of Vox Almanac, Phil Edwards explores the history and controversy behind the style. Known as "tonsure," the typical monk hairstyle has many variations throughout religions. The particular hairstyle worn by Christian monks has its own variations and controversies as well. Three different types of tonsure were popular: a coronal tonsure, a Pauline tonsure, and a third Celtic tonsure that came to represent the differences between the Roman Catholic and Celtic Catholic church. The winding path of this tonsure is a new way to look at the division within the religion and the unpredictable ways something like hair can represent faith. Support our work and get a peek behind the scenes at Vox by joining the Vox Video Lab, our members community on YouTube. Not only will you help us create bigger and better explainer videos, you’ll get a ton of cool perks and access to your favorite Vox creators too. Sign-ups start at $4.99 a month. Learn more at https://www.vox.com/join. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

The reason every meme uses that one font

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Impact was designed for 1960s ads. How did it become the #1 font for internet memes? Follow Phil Edwards and Vox Almanac on Facebook for more: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ Read more: http://www.vox.com/2015/7/26/9036993/meme-font-impact Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

How obsessive artists colorize old photos

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Photo colorization artists use a combination of research, physics, and technology to digitally reconstruct history's black and white record. Help us make more ambitious videos by joining the Vox Video Lab. It gets you exclusive perks, like livestream Q&As with all the Vox creators, a badge that levels up over time, and video extras bringing you closer to our work! Learn more at http://bit.ly/video-lab Artist links: Jordan Lloyd (@jordanjlloydhq): http://dynamichrome.com/ Mads Madsen (@Madsmadsench): http://www.colorized-history.com/ Marina Amaral (@marinamaral2): http://www.marinamaral.com/ Dana Keller (@HistoryInColor): http://www.danarkeller.com/ Patty Allison (@imbuedwithhues): https://imbuedwithhues.wordpress.com/ The Paper Time Machine: https://unbound.com/books/paper-time-machine Photo colorization isn’t just coloring within the lines — it requires meticulous research to make sure that every detail is historically accurate. The color of military uniforms, signs, vehicles, and world fashion spanning decades needs to be accounted for before even opening digital software like Photoshop. That means digging through sources like diaries, government records, old advertisements, and even consulting historical experts to get the colors right. But even after the arduous research, restoration, and blending of color, the image still isn’t finished. In order to achieve true photorealism, the physics of how light works in the atmosphere needs to be taken into account. Colors look different depending on the lighting conditions when the photo was taken, so artists rely on shadows and the location of light to make an educated guess about the time of day in a black-and-white photo. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

The World War II battle against STDs

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Not all of World War II’s battles were public. Venereal disease was a major front in the war. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Venereal disease has long been an issue for militaries, but during World War II, the problem became bigger and more global. That required unusual tactics and unorthodox strategies to beat syphilis and gonorrhea during the war. In this episode of Vox Almanac, Phil Edwards explores some of the ways the United States military fought this epidemic. Starting with Bousbir in Casablanca, it’s a tour of the uneasy relationship the military had with prostitution, recreational sex, and the venereal diseases that soldiers contracted. Both in America and around the world, it was a significant problem that resulted in health troubles and days lost on the battlefield. This piece uses numerous sources, but the most useful resource might be the history found here: https://collections.nlm.nih.gov/catalog/nlm:nlmuid-1278003R-mvset Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

How the Mona Lisa became so overrated

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It's not just the smile. There are a few real reasons Mona is so famous. Vox's Phil Edwards looked into it... Follow Phil Edwards and Vox Almanac on Facebook for more: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ Read the full article for citations and details here: http://www.vox.com/2016/9/20/12941736/mona-lisa-famous Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

It's not you. Bad doors are everywhere.

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This video is about doors. Joe Posner investigates, with some help from 99% invisible, a wonderful podcast. Check them out here: http://www.99pi.org Subscribe to our channel here: http://goo.gl/0bsAjO There's a door on the 10th floor in the Vox Media office I hate so much. You probably know one of these too. But it's not our fault. And luckily, Roman Mars of 99% Invisible magically arrived in my cellphone to send me on a cross-country journey to find out the incredible surprises behind this common complaint: Don Norman started complaining about doors over 25 years ago. Doors shouldn't need instructions – the shape of them can guide you through just fine. So why do so many doors need instruction manuals right on the side of them? When most people complain about something, nothing happens. Don Norman is not most people – he's a psychologist and cognitive scientist. Don Norman thought about, and wrote about his complaints so incredibly thoroughly that he changed the world. 99% Invisible's Roman Mars helps tell the story. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. 99% Invisible is a member of http://Radiotopia.fm Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Why cartoon characters wear gloves

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Animators had a few tricks up their slee...err gloves. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Expensive wine is for suckers

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You don't have to spend a lot of money on a bottle of wine. Few wine experts and regular people can tell the difference between expensive wine and cheap wine. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Would you use time travel to kill baby Hitler?

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Well? Would you? Vox's Phil Edwards asked author James Gleick about the history of this unusual philosophical question. Follow Phil Edwards and Vox Almanac on Facebook for more: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

The World War II meme that circled the world

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Kilroy was here — those three words showed up in a lot of surprising places. Follow Phil Edwards and Vox Almanac on Facebook for more: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ We know about the epic drama of World War II, but what about the jokes? The above video tells the story (as best as we can). The iconic piece of graffiti that was known, in America, as "Kilroy Was Here" traveled the world in a fashion remarkably similar to a modern meme. Read some more background here: http://www.vox.com/2015/12/11/9886246/kilroy-was-here Sounds via RiverNile7, Daemeon1427, and JasonElrod, found at Freesound.org. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Why the Victorian mansion is a horror icon

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The Gilded Age left a legacy of decay on the American landscape. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Haunted houses are often depicted with similar features: decaying woodwork, steep angles, and Gothic-looking towers and turrets. The model for this trope is the Victorian mansion, once a symbol of affluence and taste during the Gilded Age - a period of American history marked by political corruption and severe income inequality. After World War I, these houses were seen as extravagant and antiquated, and were abandoned. Their sinister relationship to the troubling end of the Victorian Era in America eventually led to their depiction as haunted and ghostly in both fine art and pop culture, and is now an unspoken symbol of dread. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

How a 15-year-old solved a Rubik's Cube in 5.25 seconds

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Rubik's Cube world record-holder Collin Burns tells us how he did it. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO YouTube sources: Collin Burns https://www.youtube.com/user/collinbxyz RECuber https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCpFpW3tRN0xtxuaEJvdCggA Tony Fisher https://www.youtube.com/user/KaiXevandStanley Feliks Zemdegs https://www.youtube.com/user/fazrulz1 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

The real voice of Siri explains the art of voiceover

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What does Siri really sound like? Susan Bennett, the original voice behind Siri, explains voice acting in 4 voices. Get ready to hear Siri like you've never heard her before. For much more on the art of voiceover, see the full feature on vox.com: http://www.vox.com/2015/6/23/8831131/siri-voiceover-susan-bennett Follow Phil Edwards and Vox Almanac on Facebook for more: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ Stock images in the fake ads: shutterstock.com Stock footage in the fake ads: videoblocks.com Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

The myth of the "supermale" and the extra Y chromosome

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In the 1960s and 1970s geneticists pursued a fascinating hypothesis: Is it possible that a man could be born with a criminal gene? For more: http://www.vox.com/2015/2/25/8103965/genetics-crime-xyy Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Produced & narrated by Estelle Caswell Vox.com is news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

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