Bernie Sanders' accent, explained


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Bernie Sanders' accent, explained
Bernie Sanders' accent, explained Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump both speak with a New York City accent. And Queens College linguist Michael Newman thinks it might be good for their brand. Writing in the New York Times, he said: "Americans have come to associate New Yorkers, and so New York accents, with saying what you mean, intense emotional talk and not worrying too much about whom you offend." But the larger pattern outside this year's presidential race is that the New York City accent is stigmatized, and its most distinctive features are fading. That's why Bernie Sanders provides such an interesting case study. He was born in 1941 and raised in a lower-middle-class household in a Jewish part of Brooklyn. Even though he's now spent more of his life in Vermont than in New York, his voice tells a story of his past and the past of the nation's greatest city. /// Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

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How Snapchat's filters work

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The engineering behind Snapchat's augmented-reality selfies. /// Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Expensive wine is for suckers

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You don't have to spend a lot of money on a bottle of wine. Few wine experts and regular people can tell the difference between expensive wine and cheap wine. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Why no aquarium has a great white shark

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Many have tried to keep a white shark in captivity. Here's why that's so difficult. There are several aquariums around the world, including one in Georgia, that house whale sharks, the biggest fish in the sea. But not one has a great white shark on display. Aquariums have made dozens of attempts since the 1970s to display a captive great white shark. Most of those attempts ended with dead sharks. By the 2000s, the only group still trying was the Monterey Bay Aquarium, which spent a decade planning its white shark program. In 2004, it acquired a shark that became the first great white to survive in captivity for more than 16 days. In fact, it was on display for more than six months before it was released back into the ocean. In the following years, the Monterey Bay Aquarium hosted five more juvenile white sharks for temporary stays before ending the program in 2011. It was an expensive effort and had come under criticism due to injuries that some of the sharks developed in the tank. Responding to those critics, Jon Hoech, the aquarium's director of husbandry operations, said: "We believe strongly that putting people face to face with live animals like this is very significant in inspiring ocean conservation and connecting people to the ocean environment. We feel like white sharks face a significant threats out in the wild and our ability to bring awareness to that is significant in terms of encouraging people to become ocean stewards." Check out the video above to learn why white sharks are so difficult to keep in captivity and how the Monterey Bay Aquarium designed a program that could keep them alive. Link to the Biodiversity Heritage Library: https://www.flickr.com/photos/biodivlibrary/albums Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

One Woman, 17 British Accents - Anglophenia Ep 5

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Siobhan Thompson performs a tour of the accents of the British Isles - and the celebrities who speak with them! Five lessons to help you do a better British accent here: http://www.bbcamerica.com/anglophenia/2014/04/five-lessons-help-sort-british-accent/ Photos via AP Images. Follow Anglophenia on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/anglophenia Follow Anglophenia on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/anglophenia Follow Anglophenia on Tumblr: http://anglophenia.tumblr.com Follow Siobhan Thompson on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/vornietom

Meet the enormous boats that carry your stuff

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The largest container ship in the world launched earlier this month. It's nearly the size of four football fields. Here's how container ships got so huge and transformed the global economy. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Sources: The Box, by Marc Levinson: http://www.amazon.com/The-Box-Shipping-Container-Smaller/dp/0691136408 Eric Burniche http://www.flickr.com/photos/125006583@N05/15460454056 David AE Levy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W6lV5QR_4qk MSC via Vimeo http://vimeo.com/114546802 Maersk https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U_QChxYgYWw CaptMikeRossiter https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cHPEGzQ4_ys MINISTRO2010 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fkr_n-9-x9Q Port of Antwerp https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xtyWgPC84ss Natures Lullaby https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G9H5kzSt1yg Academic Film Archive of North America https://archive.org/details/TheSeaport Prelinger Archive https://archive.org/details/IndustryOnPa ttz_shirasawa https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC2Kbrj9L9CMDrm1cY0Dx-Lw tariqismrgrumpy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lJx9OImrLcg USArmyBigPicture https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_5lOpXdOlr8 webministriestv https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rcuKON5iFzg BM SERVICE Tenerife https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z_Cz2eFQmOE chlordk https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6zuwLVOrkiM Allison Swaim https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c2qGh9n5Mio Humberto Florez/Sea-Land Service https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ECQVohqeUu4 lyzadanger http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Fredmeyer.jpg Freddycat1 https://www.flickr.com/photos/15157516@N02/4335006028 /// Vox.com is news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

The remarkable discovery of microbial life

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He was not a trained scientist, but he was insatiably curious. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

The Skyscrapers That Will Redefine New York | The B1M

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From the luxury super-slender developments of Midtown to Brooklyn’s first super-tall tower, these are the skyscrapers that are about to redefine New York. For more by The B1M subscribe now: http://ow.ly/GxW7y Read the full story on this video, including images and useful links, here: https://www.theb1m.com/video/the-skyscrapers-that-will-redefine-new-york Footage and images courtesy of VisualHouse, Extell, Michael Young, Paul Clemence, SHoP Architects, JDS Development Group, Andrew Nelson, Nordstrom, Zhen and Koodoo, CetraRuddy, Madison Equities, Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates, Bjarke Ingles Group, Max Touhey, Hudson Yards, Macklowe Properties and Gensler. The B1M merch store - https://theb1m.fanfiber.com/en View this video and more at - https://www.TheB1M.com Follow us on Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheB1M Like us on Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/TheB1M Follow us on LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-b1m-ltd Follow us on Instagram - http://instagram.com/theb1m/ #construction #architecture #NewYork We welcome you sharing our content to inspire others, but please be nice and play by our rules: http://www.theb1m.com/guidelines-for-sharing Our content may only be embedded onto third party websites by arrangement. We have established partnerships with domains to share our content and help it reach a wider audience. If you are interested in partnering with us please contact Enquiries@TheB1M.com. Ripping and/or editing this video is illegal and will result in legal action. © 2019 The B1M Limited | Share + Inspire

Building a border at 4,600 meters

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How China and Nepal are taming the Himalaya mountains. Follow Johnny to stay up to date on Vox Borders: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/johnnywharris Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/johnnyharrisvox Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Read more about the concept of non-state spaces: https://goo.gl/UsgDDy Vox Borders Episodes: 1. Haiti and the Dominican Republic ( https://youtu.be/4WvKeYuwifc) 2. The Arctic & Russia (https://youtu.be/Wx_2SVm9Jgo) 3. Japan & North Korea (https://youtu.be/qBfyIQbxXPs) 4. Mexico & Guatemala (https://youtu.be/1xbt0ACMbiA) 5. Nepal & The Himalaya (https://youtu.be/ECch2g1_6PQ) 6. Spain & Morocco (https://youtu.be/LY_Yiu2U2Ts) For thousands of years, humans have drawn lines on the earth, dividing the planet into nations. But there are some parts of the world that no empire, nation or state has been able to tame. In this episode of Borders, Johnny heads deep into the Himalaya mountains to learn about how people have lived away from the concept of borders. China and Nepal are acting fast to develop this remote region and it's having major effects on the local population. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

How David Blaine barfs frogs

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Blaine's new frog trick isn't magic at all. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

This jet fighter is a disaster, but Congress keeps buying it

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Trump says the F-35 is too expensive and he's not wrong. But this is what he's up against. Sources: 1:09 http://www.mckinsey.com/industries/public-sector/our-insights/defense-offsets-from-contractual-burden-to-competitive-weapon 1:15 https://www.sipri.org/databases/armstransfers 1:49 http://tucson.com/business/tucson/major-raytheon-expansion-could-bring-nearly-jobs-to-tucson/article_9509443f-390a-5c37-8861-9fb45179c5ab.html http://www.dailybreeze.com/article/zz/20130503/NEWS/130509581 http://www.boeing.com/company/general-info/#/employment-data 2:44 http://www.politico.com/story/2015/08/is-lockheed-martin-too-big-too-fail-121203 3:58 http://www.nytimes.com/2001/12/12/business/boeing-s-war-footing-lobbyists-are-its-army-washington-its-battlefield.html http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2002/06/uncle-sam-buys-an-airplane/302509/ 4:24 https://www.f35.com/about/economic-impact 4:44 http://www.businessinsider.com/this-map-explains-the-f-35-fiasco-2014-8 Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Lockheed Martin F-35 is the Pentagon's newest fighter jet. In a single tweet, Trump called to cancel the program. But the F-35 can't be cancelled because its deeply embedded in American politics, military and economy. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

How Americans got stuck with endless drug ads

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And what they're doing to our health. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

The font that escaped the Nazis and landed on the moon

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Futura is familiar. But its journey from avant-garde German type to hipster favorite is unusual — and it includes Nazis and the moon. Follow Phil Edwards and Vox Almanac on Facebook for more: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ Read the article here: http://www.vox.com/videos/2017/2/24/14702206/futura-font-paul-renner-history Note: The text in this video originally referred to a "limb" instead of "L.M." (Lunar module.) Vox's Phil Edwards explains in this episode of Vox Almanac. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o The Futura font (really typeface, but let's drop the pedantry for the sake of clarity) is famous. Futura was created by Paul Renner in 1920s Germany, just as the Bauhaus movement was picking up steam. Though Renner wasn't Bauhaus, Futura had that flavor, which was part of the problem. The newly powerful Nazis favored the ornate Fraktur type style to modern Futura, so they excluded both the type and its creator. Of course, Nazis are not just evil, but also often insane and inefficient — so Futura returned to Germany, as did Renner. But by that time, Futura had established itself as the international typeface of the future, and the font's legacy was secured. That's even more clear when you learn about the lunar plaque that went up on Apollo 11. Futura was the font selected for that great task — making Futura the font that escaped the Nazis and landed on the moon.

The bizarre physics of fire ants

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They're not just an animal, they're a material. And that's got engineers interested. // Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO For more information about the Hu lab: http://www.hu.gatech.edu/ Red imported fire ants (solenopsis invicta) are native to South America and an invasive species in the United States. One of the adaptations that makes them so hardy is that they can build large structures by linking their bodies together. This is how they form rafts that can float during floods. When they're aggregated together, fire ants can be seen as a material and the Hu lab at Georgia Tech has been testing that material for years. /// Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Why cities are full of uncomfortable benches

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That bench won't be yours forever. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO When designing urban spaces, city planners have many competing interests to balance. After all, cities are some of the most diverse places on the planet. They need to be built for a variety of needs. In recent years, these competing interests have surfaced conflict over an unlikely interest: purposefully uncomfortable benches. Enter the New York City MTA. They’ve installed 'leaning bars’ to supplement traditional benches & save platform space. But designs like this carry an often invisible cost: they rob citizens of hospitable public space. And the people who experience this cost most directly are those experiencing homelessness. A few notes of thanks: First to Historian A. Roger Ekirch who kindly got me up to speed on the expansion of streetlights in historic western city districts. Another thanks goes to author Veronica Harnish, who outlined some of the pitfalls that people experiencing homelessness face when choosing between sleeping rough or utilizing emergency shelters. You can read her blog here: http://car-living.blogspot.com/ A third thank you goes to the staff at the Unites States Interagency Council on Homelessness — they supplied the map in this video, as well as some aggregate statistics of the United States homeless population. Those numbers come from a variety of annual ‘Point-In-Time’ counts. The 2018 event will take place in late January, and the process depends on volunteers — so if you'd like to participate, you can find your local organizer here: https://www.hudexchange.info/grantees/find-a-grantee/?state=&program=on&coc=on¶ms=%7B%22limit%22%3A20%2C%22sort%22%3A%22%22%2C%22years%22%3A%5B%5D%2C%22searchTerm%22%3A%22%22%2C%22dir%22%3A%22%22%2C%22grantees%22%3A%5B%5D%2C%22state%22%3A%22%22%2C%22programs%22%3A%5B3%5D%2C%22coc%22%3Atrue%7D##granteeSearch Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Airplane black boxes, explained

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Sometimes flight recorders are the only way the victims' families will know what happened to the plane. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Immediately following an airplane crash anywhere in US territory, the National Transportation Safety Board dispatches a team of investigators to survey the wreckage, gather information from the airline and from air traffic control, and retrieve the plane's so-called "black boxes." These flight recorders — one stores cockpit audio recordings, the other stores airplane instrument data — are sent to NTSB's lab in Washington, DC, for analysis. There, officials listen to what are sometimes the pilots' final, panicked moments of life. They interpret not only what the pilots were saying before the crash but also any snaps, bangs, and alarms captured by the cockpit area microphone. By combining those audio clues with data from the plane's instruments and sensors, as well as evidence from the scene, investigators can usually determine the cause of the crash, even in cases with no surviving witnesses. /// Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Asian flush, explained

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It's not because they're drunker than you are. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Asian flush, also widely known as Asian glow, is when Chinese, Japanese and Korean people turn red after drinking alcohol. What causes Asian glow? Genetics, basically. Around 36% of Northeast Asians are deficient in one of the enzymes that metabolizes alcohol, due to a gene mutation called ALDH2*2. This leads to a buildup of a toxic substance called acetaldehyde, which causes Asian flush and can also cause cancer, especially esophageal cancer. /// Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

When running was for weirdos

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Today, it seems like everybody's a runner. But it wasn't always that way. Vox's Phil Edwards looked into running's history. Follow Phil Edwards and Vox Almanac on Facebook for more: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO If you've ever wondered about the history of running, jogging, and even treadmills, it turns out to be a lot more surprising than you might expect. Thanks to dedicated runners and influential leaders like Bill Bowerman, running is mainstream — but it wasn't always that way. To see some of the articles cited in this video, check out the Vox.com article here: http://www.vox.com/2015/8/9/9115981/running-jogging-history Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

The world is poorly designed. But copying nature helps.

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Biomimicry design, explained with 99% Invisible. Check them out here: https://99percentinvisible.org/ Subscribe to our channel here: http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Japan’s Shinkansen doesn’t look like your typical train. With its long and pointed nose, it can reach top speeds up to 150–200 miles per hour. It didn’t always look like this. Earlier models were rounder and louder, often suffering from the phenomenon of "tunnel boom," where deafening compressed air would rush out of a tunnel after a train rushed in. But a moment of inspiration from engineer and birdwatcher Eiji Nakatsu led the system to be redesigned based on the aerodynamics of three species of birds. Nakatsu’s case is a fascinating example of biomimicry, the design movement pioneered by biologist and writer Janine Benyus. She's a co-founder of the Biomimicry Institute, a non-profit encouraging creators to discover how big challenges in design, engineering, and sustainability have often already been solved through 3.8 billion years of evolution on earth. We just have to go out and find them. This is one of a series of videos we're launching in partnership with 99% Invisible, an awesome podcast about design. 99% Invisible is a member of http://Radiotopia.fm Additional imagery from the Biodiversity Heritage Library: https://www.flickr.com/photos/biodivlibrary/ Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

How highways wrecked American cities

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The Interstate Highway System was one of America's most revolutionary infrastructure projects. It also destroyed urban neighborhoods across the nation. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO The 48,000 miles of interstate highway that would be paved across the country during the 1950s, '60s, and '70s were a godsend for many rural communities. But those highways also gutted many cities, with whole neighborhoods torn down or isolated by huge interchanges and wide ribbons of asphalt. Wealthier residents fled to the suburbs, using the highways to commute back in by car. That drained the cities' tax bases and hastened their decline. So why did cities help build the expressways that would so profoundly decimate them? The answer involves a mix of self-interested industry groups, design choices made by people far away, a lack of municipal foresight, and outright institutional racism. Read more on Vox: https://www.vox.com/2015/5/14/8605917/highways-interstate-cities-history And see before-and-after maps of how highways changed cities like Cincinnati, Detroit, and Minneapolis: https://www.vox.com/2014/12/29/7460557/urban-freeway-slider-maps Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Decoding the ancient astronomy of Stonehenge

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The solstice alignments of Stonehenge, explained. Join the Vox Video Lab: http://www.vox.com/join Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Note: A previous version of this video referred imprecisely to "Neolithic Britain" when discussing the Newgrange tomb in Ireland. We have removed that phrasing. My apologies to the Irish. Stonehenge is a popular destination for summer solstice celebrations because the 5,000-year-old monument points toward the summer solstice sunrise on the horizon. However, it also points to the winter solstice sunset in the opposite direction and there's good reason to believe that this may have been the more important alignment for the Neolithic people who built Stonehenge. We investigate by constructing a tiny model of the Stonehenge monument. Sources: https://www.amazon.com/Stonehenge-Understanding-Mysteries-Greatest-Monument-ebook/dp/B00BBF8FLY/ref=sr_1_1 https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00BPEITG2/ref=dp-kindle-redirect?_encoding=UTF8&btkr=1 http://media.astronomicalheritage.net/media/astronomicalheritage.net/entity_000006/ras_stonehenge_factsheet.pdf http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/places/stonehenge/history/# http://www.atmo.arizona.edu/students/courselinks/fall07/nats101s31/lecture_notes/sunpaths.html https://archive.org/details/themysteryofstonehenge Newgrange photos by: Sean MacEntee https://www.flickr.com/photos/smemon/22454487890 Pdbreen https://www.flickr.com/photos/pdbreen/3796235534 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Why Japan has so many vending machines

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What vending machines can teach you about this country Subscribe to the Vox Borders newsletter for weekly updates: http://www.vox.com/borders-email Follow Johnny for more photos and videos from his travels around the globe. Facebook: https://goo.gl/l0x5cA Instagram: https://goo.gl/CduwlO While in Japan I noticed vending machines everywhere. Looking into it a little deeper a discovered that there's a very interesting answer to why Japan has so many vending machines. It's an economic story but it's also a story about how Japanese society values robotics and automation. I even found a business card vending machine: https://youtu.be/Ogb7FyzQhbk Vox Borders is a new international series focused on telling the human stories that emerge from lines on the map. Johnny will travel to six border locations to produce a final set of documentaries. While he travels he'll release dispatches on YouTube and Facebook documenting his experiences. Learn more: http://www.vox.com/borders-dispatch Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Magic Eye: The optical illusion, explained

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The science behind the stereogram craze of the 1990s. You might have remembered when sterograms appeared on Seinfeld. Learn about how these images trick the brain. Sources: MagicEye.com http://www.magiceye.com/ MagicEye.js http://peeinears.github.io/MagicEye.js/ EasyStereogramBuilder.com http://www.easystereogrambuilder.com/3d-stereogram-maker.aspx Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

50 People Show Us Their States' Accents | Culturally Speaking | Condé Nast Traveler

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In this episode of 'Culturally Speaking,' 50 people from the 50 United States of America attempt to demonstrate the accent from their home state. Does your state have an accent? Do you accent your "r's" or do you let them hang? Can you really tell where someone is from based on their accent? Find out! Still haven’t subscribed to Condé Nast Traveler on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/cntraveleryoutubesub ABOUT CONDE NAST TRAVELER Expert travel tips, destination guides, videos, and the best of food, fashion, and design from around the world. 50 People Show Us Their States' Accents | Culturally Speaking | Condé Nast Traveler

What DNA ancestry tests can — and can’t — tell you

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I took a DNA ancestry test. It didn’t tell me where my ancestors came from… Subscribe to our channel! http://bit.ly/video-lab At-home DNA ancestry tests have become hugely popular in recent years. More than 26 million have taken one of these tests. If their marketing is to be believed, they can help you learn where your DNA comes from, and even where your ancestors lived. But the information that can be inferred from your DNA is actually much more limited than testing companies are letting on. And that has lead consumers to misinterpret their results — which is having negative consequences. Further reading: The limits of ancestry DNA tests, explained https://www.vox.com/science-and-health/2019/1/28/18194560/ancestry-dna-23-me-myheritage-science-explainer Was I part British, part Dutch, a little bit Jewish? The oddness of DNA tests. https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/was-i-part-british-part-dutch-a-little-bit-jewish-the-oddness-of-dna-tests/2018/11/02/ed51b4c0-d090-11e8-83d6-291fcead2ab1_story.html?utm_term=.6a4541a06fed White nationalists are flocking to genetic ancestry tests — with surprising results https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/white-nationalists-are-flocking-to-genetic-ancestry-tests-with-surprising-results/ Direct-to-consumer racial admixture tests and beliefs about essential racial differences https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0190272514529439 The human genome diversity panel browser http://hgdp.uchicago.edu/cgi-bin/gbrowse/HGDP/?name=SLC24A5 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

Astronaut ice cream is a lie

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Astronaut ice cream — did it really fly? Vox's Phil Edwards investigates, with the help of the Smithsonian and an astronaut. Follow Phil Edwards and Vox Almanac on Facebook for more: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO For links to key documents, check out the article: http://www.vox.com/2016/2/15/10998344/astronaut-ice-cream Astronaut ice cream, space ice cream, a freeze-dried mistake: whatever you call it, you've probably eaten astronaut ice cream as a kid. But did it really fly? And was it really eaten by astronauts? The Apollo 7 mission is the only time NASA says the sweet stuff flew. So we asked Apollo 7 Lunar Module Pilot Walt Cunnningham if it was true. The answer might surprise you. Space food in general has a fascinating and complicated history, even without the ice cream. Take a look at Neil Armstrong's fruitcake. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

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