Why no aquarium has a great white shark


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Why no aquarium has a great white shark
Many have tried to keep a white shark in captivity. Here's why that's so difficult. There are several aquariums around the world, including one in Georgia, that house whale sharks, the biggest fish in the sea. But not one has a great white shark on display. Aquariums have made dozens of attempts since the 1970s to display a captive great white shark. Most of those attempts ended with dead sharks. By the 2000s, the only group still trying was the Monterey Bay Aquarium, which spent a decade planning its white shark program. In 2004, it acquired a shark that became the first great white to survive in captivity for more than 16 days. In fact, it was on display for more than six months before it was released back into the ocean. In the following years, the Monterey Bay Aquarium hosted five more juvenile white sharks for temporary stays before ending the program in 2011. It was an expensive effort and had come under criticism due to injuries that some of the sharks developed in the tank. Responding to those critics, Jon Hoech, the aquarium's director of husbandry operations, said: "We believe strongly that putting people face to face with live animals like this is very significant in inspiring ocean conservation and connecting people to the ocean environment. We feel like white sharks face a significant threats out in the wild and our ability to bring awareness to that is significant in terms of encouraging people to become ocean stewards." Check out the video above to learn why white sharks are so difficult to keep in captivity and how the Monterey Bay Aquarium designed a program that could keep them alive. Link to the Biodiversity Heritage Library: https://www.flickr.com/photos/biodivlibrary/albums Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

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Why Megalodon (Definitely) Went Extinct

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For more than 10 million years, Megalodon was at the top of its game as the oceans’ apex predator...until 2.6 million years ago, when it went extinct. So, what happened to the largest shark in history? Thanks as always to Nobumichi Tamura for allowing us to use his wonderful paleoart: http://spinops.blogspot.com/ And thanks to Joschua Knüppe and Studio 252mya for the illustration of Piscobalaena. You can find more of Joschua's work here: https://www.deviantart.com/hyrotrioskjan Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Super special thanks to the following Patreon patrons for helping make Eons possible: Katie Fichtner, Anthony Callaghan, Neil H. Gray, Marilyn Wolmart, Esmeralda Rupp-Spangle, Gregory Donovan, Ehit Dinesh Agarwal, سلطان الخليفي, Gabriel Cortez, Marcus Lejon, Anel Salas, Robert Arévalo, Robert Hill, Kelby Reid, Todd Dittman, Betsy Radley, PS, Colin Sylvester, Philip Slingerland, John Vanek, Jose Garcia, Eric Vonk, Tony Wamsley, Henrik Peteri, Jonathan Wright, Jon Monteiro, James Bording, Brad Nicholls, Miles Chaston, Michael McClellan, Jeff Graham, Maria Humphrey, Nathan Paskett, Connor Jensen, Sapjes, Daisuke Goto, Hubert Rady, Yuntao Zhou, Gregory Kintz, Tyson Cleary, Chandler Bass, Maly Lor, Joao Ascensao, Tsee Lee, Sarah Fritts, Ruben Winter, Ron Harvey Jr, Jacob Gerke, Alex Yan If you'd like to support the channel, head over to http://patreon.com/eons and pledge for some cool rewards! Want to follow Eons elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/eonsshow Twitter - https://twitter.com/eonsshow Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/eonsshow/ References: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/John_Barron3/publication/222968661_Late_Neogene_changes_in_diatom_sedimentation_in_the_North_Pacific/links/5afb194a458515c00b6d64bb/Late-Neogene-changes-in-diatom-sedimentation-in-the-North-Pacific.pdf https://www.researchgate.net/publication/312500230_A_well_preserved_skeleton_of_the_fossil_shark_Cosmopolitodus_hastalis_from_the_late_Miocene_of_Peru_featuring_fish_remains_as_fossilized_stomach_contents https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0010552 https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1475-4983.2012.01201.x https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28586693 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27381883 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4541548/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29754903 http://sciencepress.mnhn.fr/sites/default/files/articles/pdf/g2006n2a8.pdf https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27620830 https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/jbi.12754 https://www.nature.com/articles/nature09067 https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0031018216305417 https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0111086 http://science.sciencemag.org/content/327/5968/993 https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0084857 https://www.nature.com/articles/ngeo2813 https://www.researchgate.net/publication/233681377_New_fossil_teeth_of_the_White_Shark_Carcharodon_carcharias_from_the_Early_Pliocene_of_Spain_Implication_for_its_paleoecology_in_the_Mediterranean http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0042397/00001

Inside The Tanks (Full Documentary)

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Unique in its approach, Inside The Tanks is a documentary that aims to enrich the discussion surrounding marine mammal captivity. Join Presenter and Producer, Jonny Meah, as he blasts the debate wide open, giving BOTH sides of the discussion a chance to have their say. The documentary includes in depth interviews from The Born Free Foundation; Marine Biologist, Ingrid Visser; Ex-Supervisor and ex-trainer, John Hargrove; and in a world exclusive on the topic, an interview with The Zoological Director of Marineland Antibes, Jon Kershaw. Watch Inside The Tanks and join the discussion. Subtitles available in: English, French, German, Spanish, Italian. SHARE the documentary on social media, including the hashtag #InsideTheTanks. INSIDE THE TANKS IS NOT TO BE DOWNLOADED, OR REUSED, WITHOUT THE FILMMAKERS’ WRITTEN PERMISSION. If you’d like to get in touch, please feel free to email: insidethetanksdoc@outlook.com Related Websites: Inside The Tanks Official Facebook Page:https://www.facebook.com/InsideTheTanks/ Inside The Tanks Official Twitter Page: https://twitter.com/InsideTheTanks Jonny Meah: @JonnyMeah Born Free Foundation: http://www.bornfree.org.uk/ Ingrid Visser: http://www.orcaresearch.org/ Marineland: http://www.marineland.fr/ ________________________________________________________ Presented, Produced and Directed by JONNY MEAH Featuring SAMANTHA GODDARD JOHN HARGROVE Dr INGRID VISSER JON KERSHAW Assistant Producer SUMMER DEAN Editor JONNY MEAH Camera and Sound Operators SUMMER DEAN TOM AKERMAN Colourist and Mixer NEIL COLLINS Drone Operator RICARDO ARMENGOL Soundtrack A.SHAMALUEV ANIMAL WORLD MUSIC ENVATO MARKET FREE BEATS NICOLAI HEIDLAS MUSIC PLUTO TRACKS ROSS BUGDEN Archive Footage BORN FREE FOUNDATION FREE MORGAN FOUNDATION - (http://www.freemorgan.org) JAKUB WALUTEK JOHN HARGROVE MARTIN KEßLER ORCA RESEARCH TRUST RIC O'BARRY'S DOLPHIN PROJECT With Thanks to BORN FREE FOUNDATION GATWICK AIRPORT MARINELAND ANTIBES ORCA RESEARCH TRUST JENNI SUMMERS Subtitle Translators: ELENA MONTRASIO - ITALIAN IRENE BUESA - SPANISH ROSINA BIANCA LISKER - GERMAN SOUNDWAVE ON THE ROAD - FRENCH

The tiny island in New York City that nobody is allowed to visit

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There's a tiny island on the East River that you've probably never heard of, and you're not allowed to visit it. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Most people have probably never heard of it but there is a tiny 100 by 200 foot island on the East River in New York City called U Thant Island. It’s right below Roosevelt Island and next to the United Nations headquarters and has more history per square foot than most places in Manhattan. It’s origin dates back to the late 19th century when construction of an underground tunnel produced a tiny mound of rock that was originally named Belmont Island, after August Belmont Jr. who financed the construction project. In the intervening years it was leased by a Buddhist spiritual group, crashed into by numerous vessels, and briefly occupied by a protesting artist.

How you could get away with murder in Yellowstone’s “Zone of Death"

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There's a 50 square mile section of land in Idaho where a murderer could get away scot free. Read more here: http://www.vox.com/2014/5/22/5738756/you-can-kill-someone-in-a-section-of-yellowstone-and-get-away-scot Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Hawaii Diver Swims With Record Breaking Largest Great White Shark | TODAY

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» See more footage of the massive great white shark: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=duSPHGiPhwk Marine biologist Ocean Ramsey joins TODAY to talk about her and her team of divers’ encounter off the coast of Hawaii with what could be the largest great white shark on the planet. “It fills my heart with joy and takes my breath away,” she says. » Subscribe to TODAY: http://on.today.com/SubscribeToTODAY » Watch the latest from TODAY: http://bit.ly/LatestTODAY About: TODAY brings you the latest headlines and expert tips on money, health and parenting. We wake up every morning to give you and your family all you need to start your day. If it matters to you, it matters to us. We are in the people business. Subscribe to our channel for exclusive TODAY archival footage & our original web series. Connect with TODAY Online! Visit TODAY's Website: http://on.today.com/ReadTODAY Find TODAY on Facebook: http://on.today.com/LikeTODAY Follow TODAY on Twitter: http://on.today.com/FollowTODAY Follow TODAY on Google+: http://on.today.com/PlusTODAY Follow TODAY on Instagram: http://on.today.com/InstaTODAY Follow TODAY on Pinterest: http://on.today.com/PinTODAY #GreatWhiteShark #OceanRamsey #TodayShow Hawaii Diver Swims With Record Breaking Largest Great White Shark | TODAY

Why danger symbols can’t last forever

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How to design fear, explained with 99% Invisible. Check them out here: http://99pi.org Correction: The correct spelling of “warning” in Persian is هشدار. Watch the previous episode from this series: http://bit.ly/2DDIQAL Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Chances are you wouldn’t be able to recognize a biohazard even if you were looking right at one. But the biohazard symbol? It’s pretty easy to spot. Most warning icons rely on previously established objects or symbols: a general caution might use an exclamation point, and a fire warning might use an illustration of a flame. But the biohazard symbol references an idea that is much harder to picture — and in the 50 years since its invention, it has become one of the most recognizable icons on the planet. But can the meaning of a symbol like this last an eternity? A special Department of Energy project is trying to figure that out. Read more: https://goo.gl/U82Ehn This video was made in partnership with 99% Invisible, a podcast about all the thought that goes into the things we don’t think about, hosted by Roman Mars. You can find full episodes at http://99pi.org Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Why knights fought snails in medieval art

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Look in the margins of medieval books and you'll find an unusual theme: knights vs. snails. Follow Phil Edwards and Vox Almanac on Facebook for more: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ Lillian Randall's paper is here: https://www.scribd.com/document/263159779/The-Snail-in-Gothic-Marginal-Warfare And Michael Camille's book about marginal art can be found here: http://www.reaktionbooks.co.uk/display.asp?K=9780948462283 http://press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/distributed/I/bo3536323.html Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Medieval snails and knights — who knew? It turns out that medieval illuminated manuscripts featured a lot of bizarre imagery in the margins, but this pocket of art history might be one of the most intriguing. Scholar Lilian Randall provides the best theory for the unusual motif: these medieval knights fought snails in the margins because snails represented the Lombards, who had become widely despised lenders throughout Europe. Snail was an insult and, over time, it became a type of meme detached from its original meaning. Of course, like much of art history, this theory is just a theory. But it gives us an insight into the rich culture of marginal art and all the complexity, confusion, and amusement that sits on the side of the page. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

That Time It Rained for Two Million Years

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Viewers like you help make PBS (Thank you 😃) . Support your local PBS Member Station here: https://to.pbs.org/DonateEONS Check out our NEW POSTER: https://store.dftba.com/products/eons-poster At the beginning of the Triassic Period, with the continents locked together from pole-to-pole in the supercontinent of Pangea, the world is hot, flat, and very, very dry. But then 234 million years ago, the climate suddenly changed for the wetter. Thanks as always to Nobumichi Tamura for allowing us to use his wonderful paleoart: http://spinops.blogspot.com/ Thanks to Franz Anthony, Julio Lacerda and Studio 252mya for their illustrations. You can find more of their work here: Julio Lacerda: https://252mya.com/gallery/julio-lacerda Franz Anthony: https://252mya.com/gallery/franz-anthony Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Want to follow Eons elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/eonsshow Twitter - https://twitter.com/eonsshow Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/eonsshow/ References: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0031018214003253 http://journals.plos.org/plosbiology/article?id=10.1371/journal.pbio.1001853 http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0161457 http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/abs/10.1086/413056 https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-018-03996-1 http://science.sciencemag.org/content/321/5895/1485.short https://pubs.geoscienceworld.org/gsa/geology/article-abstract/40/1/79/130736 https://ttu-ir.tdl.org/ttu-ir/bitstream/handle/2346/20221/31295008017864.pdf?sequence=1 http://www.jstor.org/stable/41684613?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0031018298001175 https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0031018215003053 https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1111/j.1475-4983.2007.00704.x https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0031018210001434 https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0031018205005286 http://science.sciencemag.org/content/sci/254/5029/263.full.pdf?casa_token=7g3gnYUD0gIAAAAA:PcbqrP5BLHUzxbhQgHKmNPI27ma_gB6Ph3nnFzWkXZZd4nPju5fE6ieeTv-4GAGCBxGnzMtu-xFK0g https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0031018209004805 http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/90239/1/Carnian%20humidity%20final%20version.pdf https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Michael_Simms4/publication/249546497_Climatic_and_biotic_change_in_the_Late_Triassic/links/56543f2b08ae1ef929767f3f.pdf http://science.sciencemag.org/content/338/6105/366.short http://palaeo.gly.bris.ac.uk/benton/reprints/1982triassic.pdf

Meet the designer cats with wild blood

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Bengals, Savannahs, and Toygers, explained. Help us make more ambitious videos by joining the Vox Video Lab. It gets you exclusive perks, like livestream Q&As with all the Vox creators, a badge that levels up over time, and video extras bringing you closer to our work! Learn more at http://bit.ly/video-lab Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. By breeding house cats with wild animals, humans developed hybrid cats that look like little leopards. Bengal cats are a breed that was developed by breeding domestic cats with asian leopard cats. The first American bengal breeder is a woman named Jean Mill, but her work has continued through other breeders. We met one of those breeders, Anthony Hutcherson, when we went to film the cats at the Westminster Dog Show. Besides bengals, we also saw another hybrid breed: savannahs. Instead of asian leopard cats, savannahs were developed by breeding house cats with servals. Unlike the other two breeds, the last breed we met, toygers, are not hybrid cats. Breeder Judy Sugden created the breed by carefully breeding domestic cats with qualities that resemble wild tigers. To learn more about the cats and the breeders that made possible, watch the video above. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Why China is building islands in the South China Sea

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China claims they aren't military bases, but their actions say otherwise. Help us make more ambitious videos by joining the Vox Video Lab. It gets you exclusive perks, like livestream Q&As with all the Vox creators, a badge that levels up over time, and video extras bringing you closer to our work! Learn more at http://bit.ly/video-lab China is building islands in the South China sea and its causing disputes among the other nations in the region; Malaysia, the Philippines, Brunei, Vietnam, and Indonesia. The US has many allies in the region and uses its massive Navy to patrol international waters, keeping shipping lanes open for trade To truly understand the international conflicts and trends shaping our world you need a big-picture view. Video journalist Sam Ellis uses maps to tell these stories and chart their effects on foreign policy. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

2016 Olympics: What Rio doesn’t want the world to see

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Rio is hiding poor people. See Part II: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c3BRTlHFpBU Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO The 2016 Olympics are set to begin in just over a month in Rio de Janeiro. As the city prepares to receive an influx of international visitors, it is building new infrastructure and transportation systems to accommodate the surge. But the city is also undergoing another major project: hiding and removing poor people from view of foreign onlookers. I went to Rio to see how the city is transforming to make way for the Olympics Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

The bizarre physics of fire ants

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They're not just an animal, they're a material. And that's got engineers interested. // Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO For more information about the Hu lab: http://www.hu.gatech.edu/ Red imported fire ants (solenopsis invicta) are native to South America and an invasive species in the United States. One of the adaptations that makes them so hardy is that they can build large structures by linking their bodies together. This is how they form rafts that can float during floods. When they're aggregated together, fire ants can be seen as a material and the Hu lab at Georgia Tech has been testing that material for years. /// Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Divided island: How Haiti and the DR became two worlds

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One island, two worlds. Follow Johnny on social media to stay up to date: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/johnnywharris Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/johnnyharrisvox The six Vox Borders documentaries, presented by lululemon, are publishing weekly on Tuesdays. Thanks to our sponsor, lululemon. Link for lululemon's Mens Pants: https://shop.lululemon.com/c/men Haiti and the Dominican Republic share a border, and an island. But the two countries are very different today: the Dominican Republic enjoys higher quality of life for many factors than Haiti. I went to this island and visited both countries, to try and understand when and how their paths diverged. And I began to learn how those differences are playing out in the present. Vox Borders is a new international documentary series presented by lululemon, by Emmy-nominated videojournalist Johnny Harris. For this series, Johnny is producing six 10-15 minute documentaries about different borders stories from around the world. Vox Borders Episodes: 1. Haiti and the Dominican Republic ( https://youtu.be/4WvKeYuwifc) 2. The Arctic & Russia (https://youtu.be/Wx_2SVm9Jgo) 3. Japan & North Korea (https://youtu.be/qBfyIQbxXPs) 4. Mexico & Guatemala (https://youtu.be/1xbt0ACMbiA) 5. Nepal & The Himalaya (https://youtu.be/ECch2g1_6PQ) 6. Spain & Morocco (https://youtu.be/LY_Yiu2U2Ts) Credits: Video by Johnny Harris Producer: Christina Thornell Story Editor: Joss Fong Animation: Sam Ellis Assistant Editing: Mwita Chacha Fixer and Translator: Pascal Antoine Executive Producer: Joe Posner Managing Producer: Valerie Lapinski Art Director: Dion Lee Engagement Editor: Blair Hickman Senior Engagement Manager: Lauren Katz Audience Development Manager: Agnes Mazur Engagement Video Producer: Tian Wang

Former trainer blows the whistle on SeaWorld

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Alex Ferrer investigates the treatment of SeaWorld's captive killer whales for "Whistleblower." Watch the full episode on CBS Friday, June 7, at 8/7c. Subscribe to the CBS News Channel HERE: http://youtube.com/cbsnews Watch CBSN live HERE: http://cbsn.ws/1PlLpZ7 Follow CBS News on Instagram HERE: https://www.instagram.com/cbsnews/ Like CBS News on Facebook HERE: http://facebook.com/cbsnews Follow CBS News on Twitter HERE: http://twitter.com/cbsnews Get the latest news and best in original reporting from CBS News delivered to your inbox. Subscribe to newsletters HERE: http://cbsn.ws/1RqHw7T Get your news on the go! Download CBS News mobile apps HERE: http://cbsn.ws/1Xb1WC8 Get new episodes of shows you love across devices the next day, stream CBSN and local news live, and watch full seasons of CBS fan favorites like Star Trek Discovery anytime, anywhere with CBS All Access. Try it free! http://bit.ly/1OQA29B --- CBSN is the first digital streaming news network that will allow Internet-connected consumers to watch live, anchored news coverage on their connected TV and other devices. At launch, the network is available 24/7 and makes all of the resources of CBS News available directly on digital platforms with live, anchored coverage 15 hours each weekday. CBSN. Always On.

The right way to kill a fish

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The most popular way to kill fish isn’t great for the fish — or our taste buds. Ting Mobile is the smarter choice for affordable cell phone service. Get a $25 credit when you try Ting at https://vox.ting.com Become a Vox Video Lab member! http://bit.ly/video-lab Most fish die the same way — slow suffocation in the open air. It’s easy for fishers, but it causes fish tons of stress, and floods their bodies with chemicals like cortisol, adrenaline, and lactic acid. Those chemicals make the fish taste bad, smell “fishy,” and rot quickly.  But there's a better way: a four-step Japanese method called ikejime. It involves sharp knives. And a brain spike.  We adapted this video from Vox’s Future Perfect podcast, which goes much more in depth on ikejime: https://www.vox.com/future-perfect/2018/11/14/18091698/future-perfect-podcast-killing-fish-ikejime-animal-welfare  Cat Ferguson wrote a detailed article on the process at Topic: https://www.topic.com/how-to-kill-a-fish This article about fish and pain from the Smithsonian informed reporting: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/fish-feel-pain-180967764/  And here’s a link to the Ike Jime Federation, where Andrew is the president: https://www.ikejimefederation.com/ Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

Inside Hong Kong’s cage homes

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When houses are the size of parking spaces. Follow Johnny on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/johnnywharris/ Follow the Vox Borders watch page: https://www.facebook.com/VoxBorders/ Sign up for the Borders newsletter: http://www.vox.com/borders-email With original music by Tom Fox: https://m.soundcloud.com/user-416166523 Hong Kong is the most expensive housing market in the world. It has been ranked as the least affordable housing market on Earth for eight years in a row, and the price per square foot seems to be only going up. The inflated prices are forcing Hongkongers to squeeze into unconventionally small spaces that can affect their quality of life. Tens of thousands of Hongkongers are living in spaces that range from 75 to 140 square feet. To put that in perspective, the average parking space in the US is about 150 square feet. And in the most extreme cases, Hongkongers have resorted to homes the size of a coffin. I spent some time exploring the living situation in Hong Kong to find out why housing has become so expensive and spaces so tight. To understand how Hong Kong’s housing market turned out this way and see how it’s affecting people’s lives, watch the final episode of Borders Hong Kong. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox Borders is an international documentary series by Emmy-nominated producer Johnny Harris exploring life at the edge of nations. For more, visit vox.com/borders. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

How dead is the Great Barrier Reef?

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Coral bleaching is the biggest threat to the Great Barrier Reef. But it's too early for obituaries. Start your Audible 30-day free trial at http://www.audible.com/vox Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Sources: https://www.eposters.net/pdfs/the-2014-2016-global-coral-bleaching-event-preliminary-comparisons-between-thermal-stress-and.pdf http://www.globalcoralbleaching.org/ http://catlinseaviewsurvey.com/gallery https://www.coralcoe.org.au/media-releases/two-thirds-of-great-barrier-reef-hit-by-back-to-back-mass-coral-bleaching https://www.coris.noaa.gov/activities/reef_managers_guide/reef_managers_guide.pdf https://www.nature.com/articles/ncomms12093 http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0114321 https://www.nature.com/articles/srep39666 https://www.flickr.com/search/?user_id=61021753%40N02&view_all=1&text=coral NBC 1970 https://archive.org/details/greatbarrierreef Guillaume Debever https://vimeo.com/82607901 Martin Lalonde https://vimeo.com/119572437 Australia's Great Barrier Reef is the largest coral reef system in the world and the only living structure visible from space. Although ecosystem managers in Australia have worked hard to preserve the reefs, the past couple of decades have brought a new threat that can't be solved by any one country alone: human-induced global warming. Rising ocean temperatures have caused mass coral bleaching in coral reefs around the world, in every tropical ocean from the Caribbean to the South Pacific. This is now considered to be the biggest threat that coral reefs face, and they face many, including overfishing, pollution, storm damage, and invasive species. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Why Are We The Only Humans Left?

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Viewers like you help make PBS (Thank you 😃) . Support your local PBS Member Station here: https://to.pbs.org/PBSDSDonate Try 23andMe at: http://www.23andme.com/okay Part 2 of our special series on Human Ancestry. Watch it all: http://bit.ly/OKTBSHuman ↓↓↓More info and sources below ↓↓↓ In part 2 of our special series on human ancestry, we ask why we are the only surviving branch on the human evolutionary tree. Just 50,000-100,000 years ago, Earth was home to three or four separate human species, including our most famous cousins: the Neanderthals. New research has shown that Neanderthals were not the brutish, unintelligent cavemen that cartoons make them out to be. They were creative, smart, social, and perhaps even had complex language. So why did they go extinct as soon as Homo sapiens moved into their territory? Does any trace of them live on today? Why don’t we have Neanderthal neighbors? ----------- REFERENCES: Papagianni, Dimitra, and Michael A. Morse. The Neanderthals Rediscovered: How Modern Science Is Rewriting Their Story. Thames & Hudson, 2015. http://amzn.to/2oov6GG (Library: http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/923279213) Stringer, Chris. “Lone survivors: How we came to be the only humans on earth.” Macmillan, 2012. http://amzn.to/2oIFg3q (Library: http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/855581724) Tattersall, Ian. “Masters of the planet: the search for our human origins.” Macmillan, 2012. http://amzn.to/2pOZrKS (Library: http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/733231407) Walter, Chip. “Last ape standing: the seven-million-year story of how and why we survived.” Bloomsbury Publishing USA, 2013. http://amzn.to/2pP2liy (Library: http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/872121723) ----------- FOLLOW US: Merch: https://store.dftba.com/collections/its-okay-to-be-smart Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/itsokaytobesmart Twitter: @okaytobesmart @DrJoeHanson Tumblr: http://www.itsokaytobesmart.com Instagram: @DrJoeHanson Snapchat: YoDrJoe ----------- It’s Okay To Be Smart is hosted by Joe Hanson, Ph.D. Director: Joe Nicolosi Writer: Joe Hanson Producer/editor/animator: Andrew Matthews Producer: Stephanie Noone and Amanda Fox Produced by PBS Digital Studios Music via APM Stock images from Shutterstock http://www.shutterstock.com

Testing if Sharks Can Smell a Drop of Blood

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Scientific proof Pixar sits on a throne of lies. Thanks to Bose for their support and for the dopest headphones I've ever worn: https://bose.life/markrober Also, thanks to Discovery for putting my life in danger. #SharkWeek begins July 28 only on Discovery FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/sharkweek TWITTER: https://twitter.com/sharkweek INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/sharkweek/ YOUTUBE: https://www.youtube.com/discoverychannel Links for the build instructions: https://www.dropbox.com/s/iqn14ydzqafhws5/SharkBait_Manual_PartsList.pdf?dl=0 Sean's Hodgin's channel who did most of the heavy lifting for making the boxes: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCE-bw6PRKuDlH6fP1mP4nOw Pump animation made by the talented Jared Owens: http://youtube.com/JaredOwen Connor was the beast feeding the sharks underwater. He has some amazing footage for licensing and his own YouTube channel. YT: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5fn3MXGv41LY-BB8XRjyCQ email: sharkmanconnor@gmail.com Insta: @sharkmanconnor Follow my marine biologist friend Luke Tipple on Instagram- https://www.instagram.com/luketipple/ More info that was promised- What is likely happening is that the sharks can smell the blood but it's just not in a quantity that is interesting to them especially since they don't love human blood that much (btw, I spoke with a marine biologist and mammal blood is all the same from a chemical marker stand point so cow blood is a suitable substitute for human blood). If I did the experiment again, I would want to test human blood vs. fish blood. This is the most definitive study done to date in a control lab environment on what is least and most interesting to them: The Biology of Sharks and Rays Peter A. Klimley and Steven Oerding; ISBN-13: 9780226442495. Particularly pages 134-140. Figure 6.7; Table 6.2 ***Music*** 00:11 - Arrow - Andrew Applepie http://andrewapplepie.com/ 01:14 - Kalimba Jam - Blue Wednesday https://soundcloud.com/bluewednesday/ 2:30 - Dizzy - Political Statement and JMoney - https://soundcloud.com/dylanruff/political-statement-jmoney-dizzy 3:59 - Cereal Killa - Blue Wednesday https://soundcloud.com/bluewednesday/ 5:17 - Marimba Idea - Blue Wednesday https://soundcloud.com/bluewednesday/ 6:12 - Berlin - Andrew Applepie - http://andrewapplepie.com/ 6:40 - Dansez - Fasion https://soundcloud.com/michalgallo/dansez-fasion-beats-music 10:45 - Dive - Lvly https://www.epidemicsound.com/track/4JmHD4z5Bj 12:34 - New Shoes - Blue Wednesday https://soundcloud.com/bluewednesday/ 13:02 - Q - Blue Wednesday https://soundcloud.com/bluewednesday/ 15:12 - Too Happy to be cool by Notebreak https://soundcloud.com/notebreak/dubstep-too-happy-to-be-cool Summary: I've always wanted to test if sharks can really smell a single drop of blood in the water from 1 mile away. So I went to the Bahamas in shark infested waters and set up an experiment to get to the bottom of things. MERCH- They are soft- https://teespring.com/stores/markrober PLEASE CONSIDER SUBSCRIBING: http://tinyurl.com/MarkRober-Sub ****************************************­ I make videos like this once a month all year long while supplies last: CHECK OUT MY CHANNEL: http://tinyurl.com/MarkRober-YouTube FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/MarkRoberYouTube TWITTER: https://twitter.com/#!/MarkRober INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/markrober/

The 1995 Hubble photo that changed astronomy

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The Hubble Deep Field, explained by the man who made it happen. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO If you hold a pin at arm’s length up in the air, the head of the pin covers approximately the amount of sky that appears in the Hubble Deep Field. The iconic 1995 image is crowded, not because it’s a broad swath of sky but because it’s a broad swath of time. The Hubble Deep Field is more than 12 billion light-years deep. Robert Williams was the director of the Hubble’s science institute back in 1995, and it was his decision to attempt a deep field observation with the telescope. Previous calculations had indicated that Hubble would not be able to detect very distant galaxies, but Williams figured they’d never know unless they tried. His team chose a completely dark part of the sky, in order to see beyond the stars of the Milky Way, and programmed Hubble to stare at that spot for 10 days. It was unusual to use precious observing time to point the telescope at nothing in particular, but that’s what they did. "We didn’t know what was there, and that was the whole purpose of the observation, basically — to get a core sample of the universe," Williams said, borrowing the concept of the "core sample" from the earth sciences. "You do the same thing if you're trying to understand the geology of the Earth: Pick some typical spot to drill down to try to understand exactly what the various layers of the Earth are and what they mean in terms of its geologic history." What makes the Hubble Deep Field an atypical core sample is that rather than observing the material as it is now, the telescope collected images of galaxies as they appeared millions and billions of years ago. Since light can only travel so fast, the telescope is a peephole into the history of the universe. Click here to download the Hubble Deep Field images: http://www.spacetelescope.org/science/deep_fields/ Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

It's not you. Bad doors are everywhere.

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This video is about doors. Joe Posner investigates, with some help from 99% invisible, a wonderful podcast. Check them out here: http://www.99pi.org Subscribe to our channel here: http://goo.gl/0bsAjO There's a door on the 10th floor in the Vox Media office I hate so much. You probably know one of these too. But it's not our fault. And luckily, Roman Mars of 99% Invisible magically arrived in my cellphone to send me on a cross-country journey to find out the incredible surprises behind this common complaint: Don Norman started complaining about doors over 25 years ago. Doors shouldn't need instructions – the shape of them can guide you through just fine. So why do so many doors need instruction manuals right on the side of them? When most people complain about something, nothing happens. Don Norman is not most people – he's a psychologist and cognitive scientist. Don Norman thought about, and wrote about his complaints so incredibly thoroughly that he changed the world. 99% Invisible's Roman Mars helps tell the story. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. 99% Invisible is a member of http://Radiotopia.fm Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

How free games are designed to make money

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"Freemium" games can end up gaming gamers. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO The "freemium" business model allows us to use an app for free with the option to purchase additional features. In the case of games, that model can fundamentally alter the user experience, from gaming to getting gamed. By collecting troves of data on how users play their games, developers have mastered the science of applied addiction. And with the rise of "freemium" games that rely on micro-transactions, they have good reason to deploy the tools of behavioral psychology to inspire purchases. In the video above, I spoke to Jamie Madigan, author of a blog, podcast, and book about the psychology of video games. We take a look at some of the mind tricks that some of these games use to convert players into payers. You can find more of his work here: https://www.psychologyofgames.com Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Why we say “OK”

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How a cheesy joke from the 1830s became the most widely spoken word in the world. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO OK is thought to be the most widely recognized word on the planet. We use it to communicate with each other, as well as our technology. But it actually started out as a language fad in the 1830’s of abbreviating words incorrectly. Young intellectuals in Boston came up with several of these abbreviations, including “KC” for “knuff ced,” “OW” for “oll wright,” and KY for “know yuse.” But thanks to its appearance in Martin Van Buren’s 1840 presidential re-election campaign as the incumbents new nickname, Old Kinderhook, OK outlived its abbreviated comrades. Later, widespread use by early telegraph operators caused OK to go mainstream, and its original purpose as a neutral affirmative is still how we use it today. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

Why babies in medieval paintings look like ugly old men

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Why are the babies in medieval art so ugly? Phil Edwards dug a little to find out: http://www.vox.com/2015/7/8/8908825/ugly-medieval-babies Follow Phil Edwards and Vox Almanac on Facebook for more: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Why people think they see ghosts

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Even though there is no scientific evidence that ghosts exist, you may not be crazy if you see one. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o 48% of Americans profess to believe in ghosts, and around a quarter say that they've actually seen a ghost before. I wanted to find out if there was any proof of their existence, so I spoke with Joe Nickell, allegedly the world's only paranormal investigator who had researched reported hauntings for almost 50 years. He says that he's never seen any evidence that would point towards the existence of ghosts. Nickell walks us through the various scientific explanations for why people think they see ghosts, including sleep paralysis, waking dreams, traumatic grief, and exposure to infrasound. So even though there may be no evidence that ghosts exist, that doesn't mean that you might not see one.

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