The bizarre physics of fire ants


Details

The bizarre physics of fire ants
They're not just an animal, they're a material. And that's got engineers interested. // Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO For more information about the Hu lab: http://www.hu.gatech.edu/ Red imported fire ants (solenopsis invicta) are native to South America and an invasive species in the United States. One of the adaptations that makes them so hardy is that they can build large structures by linking their bodies together. This is how they form rafts that can float during floods. When they're aggregated together, fire ants can be seen as a material and the Hu lab at Georgia Tech has been testing that material for years. /// Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Category:

video

Tags:

Pigeons are gross. They're also wildly underrated.

573 Views 817 Comments

This video will change the way you look at pigeons. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Sources: Superdove: How the Pigeon took Manhattan... and the World http://www.amazon.com/Superdove-Pigeon-Took-Manhattan-World/dp/0061259160 Pigeons: The Fascinating Saga of the World's Most Revered and Reviled Bird http://www.amazon.com/Pigeons-Fascinating-Worlds-Revered-Reviled/dp/0802143288/ref=sr_1_1 Simon de Kruijf https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yHucNka_v64 F Alzheimers https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c7vuU4R9Nj4 Mike McKenzie https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rn55q7zE7Zc NYU Local https://vimeo.com/49680488 B.F. Skinner Foundation https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-cO_UIkJYUacckkE7LPwTA Archive.org https://archive.org/details/Betty_Boop_Training_Pigeons_1936 https://archive.org/details/FB-32 justwalkiniam https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T2_FARacbU0 NTDTV https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zsnUXY2EWXI ocdoves https://www.youtube.com/user/ocdoves Project Sea Hunt http://www.uscg.mil/history/articles/PigeonSARProject.asp MrWizardStudios https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uOkpvEZ-p2k The Tom Lehrer Wisdom Channel https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yhuMLpdnOjY Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Why parrots can talk like humans

899 Views 580 Comments

Monkeys are our closest biological relatives, and they can't speak. But parrots don’t seem to have a problem at all. This video is presented by Wix: https://www.wix.com/go/vox Become a Video Lab member! http://bit.ly/video-lab In 2016 researchers released a study with an incredible headline: monkey vocal tracts are speech-ready. It showed that monkeys are held back from speech not by their bodies, but by their brains. But if that’s the case, what’s the deal with birds? Parrots are known for their ability to mimic human speech with incredible accuracy. It’s jarring to hear an animal so vastly different from us speaking our language. So how do they do it? Partially, neurology: parrots are wired for communication in ways other animals (including other birds) are not. But it’s largely physiology. Birds are uniquely equipped to make sounds, and this video will give you a basic overview of how that works. Throughout reporting this piece I had several conversations with Dr. Irene Pepperberg – If you’re interested in the neurology of these birds, I highly recommend checking out her studies on African Grey parrots. I’ve linked to a few of them below: Evidence for Conceptual Quantitative Abilities in the African Grey Parrot: Labeling of Cardinal Sets Acquisition of the same/different concept by an African Grey parrot: Learning with respect to categories of color, shape, and material Number Comprehension by a Grey Parrot (Psittacus erithacus), Including a Zero-Like Concept Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

How you could get away with murder in Yellowstone’s “Zone of Death"

337 Views 997 Comments

There's a 50 square mile section of land in Idaho where a murderer could get away scot free. Read more here: http://www.vox.com/2014/5/22/5738756/you-can-kill-someone-in-a-section-of-yellowstone-and-get-away-scot Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

See How Termites Inspired a Building That Can Cool Itself | Decoder

471 Views 535 Comments

How do you cool a building without air conditioning? Using an approach called biomimicry, see how architect Mick Pearce harnessed the ingenuity of termites to design a natural cooling system for the largest commercial building in Zimbabwe. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe #NationalGeographic #Decoder #Termites About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta In nature, termites build skyscraper-like mounds that are ventilated by a complex system of tunnels. By emulating the ingenuity of termites, Zimbabwean architect Mick Pearce used an approach called biomimicry to design a natural cooling system that harnessed nature. The result is an architectural marvel that achieves 90 percent passive climate control by taking cool air into the building at night and expelling heat throughout the day. In this first installation of the Decoder series, see how the Eastgate Centre in Harare, Zimbabwe utilizes a termite-inspired climate control system. To learn more, read "Termite Climate Control" from the May 2018 issue of National Geographic magazine. See How Termites Inspired a Building That Can Cool Itself | Decoder https://youtu.be/620omdSZzBs National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo

Thin underwater cables hold the internet. See a map of them all.

683 Views 702 Comments

Your internet isn't just underwater. It's also covered in Vaseline. Follow Phil Edwards and Vox Almanac on Facebook for more: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ Map by TeleGeography: http://www.submarinecablemap.com/ Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO The internet is known to pulse through fiber optic cables and cell phone towers, but 99% of high-speed international information is transferred under the sea. How long has this been happening? Underwater cables delivering information isn't a novel idea — the first Transatlantic cable was laid in 1858—undersea cables have been around since the telegraph. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Antlion Cone Death Trap | The Hunt | BBC Earth

784 Views 177 Comments

In the Namib desert where the sands can reach a scorching 70 degrees centigrade, very little is able to survive, but the Hotrod Ant can amazingly thrive and even forage for food. In this tense encounter an unsuspecting Hotrod Ant has strayed in AntLion territory and faces the ultimate test of survival. Taken From The Hunt Subscribe to the BBC Earth YouTube channel: http://bit.ly/BBCEarthSub Want to share your views with the team behind BBC Earth and win prizes? Join our fan panel here: https://tinyurl.com/YouTube-BBCEarth-FanPanel BBC Earth Facebook http://www.facebook.com/bbcearth BBC Earth Twitter http://www.twitter.com/bbcearth BBC Earth Instagram https://www.instagram.com/bbcearth/?hl=en Visit http://www.bbc.com/earth/world for all the latest animal news and wildlife videos This is a channel from BBC Studios who help fund new BBC programmes.

Building a border at 4,600 meters

301 Views 520 Comments

How China and Nepal are taming the Himalaya mountains. Follow Johnny to stay up to date on Vox Borders: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/johnnywharris Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/johnnyharrisvox Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Read more about the concept of non-state spaces: https://goo.gl/UsgDDy Vox Borders Episodes: 1. Haiti and the Dominican Republic ( https://youtu.be/4WvKeYuwifc) 2. The Arctic & Russia (https://youtu.be/Wx_2SVm9Jgo) 3. Japan & North Korea (https://youtu.be/qBfyIQbxXPs) 4. Mexico & Guatemala (https://youtu.be/1xbt0ACMbiA) 5. Nepal & The Himalaya (https://youtu.be/ECch2g1_6PQ) 6. Spain & Morocco (https://youtu.be/LY_Yiu2U2Ts) For thousands of years, humans have drawn lines on the earth, dividing the planet into nations. But there are some parts of the world that no empire, nation or state has been able to tame. In this episode of Borders, Johnny heads deep into the Himalaya mountains to learn about how people have lived away from the concept of borders. China and Nepal are acting fast to develop this remote region and it's having major effects on the local population. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Decoding the ancient astronomy of Stonehenge

977 Views 710 Comments

The solstice alignments of Stonehenge, explained. Join the Vox Video Lab: http://www.vox.com/join Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Note: A previous version of this video referred imprecisely to "Neolithic Britain" when discussing the Newgrange tomb in Ireland. We have removed that phrasing. My apologies to the Irish. Stonehenge is a popular destination for summer solstice celebrations because the 5,000-year-old monument points toward the summer solstice sunrise on the horizon. However, it also points to the winter solstice sunset in the opposite direction and there's good reason to believe that this may have been the more important alignment for the Neolithic people who built Stonehenge. We investigate by constructing a tiny model of the Stonehenge monument. Sources: https://www.amazon.com/Stonehenge-Understanding-Mysteries-Greatest-Monument-ebook/dp/B00BBF8FLY/ref=sr_1_1 https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00BPEITG2/ref=dp-kindle-redirect?_encoding=UTF8&btkr=1 http://media.astronomicalheritage.net/media/astronomicalheritage.net/entity_000006/ras_stonehenge_factsheet.pdf http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/places/stonehenge/history/# http://www.atmo.arizona.edu/students/courselinks/fall07/nats101s31/lecture_notes/sunpaths.html https://archive.org/details/themysteryofstonehenge Newgrange photos by: Sean MacEntee https://www.flickr.com/photos/smemon/22454487890 Pdbreen https://www.flickr.com/photos/pdbreen/3796235534 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

This jet fighter is a disaster, but Congress keeps buying it

642 Views 101 Comments

Trump says the F-35 is too expensive and he's not wrong. But this is what he's up against. Sources: 1:09 http://www.mckinsey.com/industries/public-sector/our-insights/defense-offsets-from-contractual-burden-to-competitive-weapon 1:15 https://www.sipri.org/databases/armstransfers 1:49 http://tucson.com/business/tucson/major-raytheon-expansion-could-bring-nearly-jobs-to-tucson/article_9509443f-390a-5c37-8861-9fb45179c5ab.html http://www.dailybreeze.com/article/zz/20130503/NEWS/130509581 http://www.boeing.com/company/general-info/#/employment-data 2:44 http://www.politico.com/story/2015/08/is-lockheed-martin-too-big-too-fail-121203 3:58 http://www.nytimes.com/2001/12/12/business/boeing-s-war-footing-lobbyists-are-its-army-washington-its-battlefield.html http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2002/06/uncle-sam-buys-an-airplane/302509/ 4:24 https://www.f35.com/about/economic-impact 4:44 http://www.businessinsider.com/this-map-explains-the-f-35-fiasco-2014-8 Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Lockheed Martin F-35 is the Pentagon's newest fighter jet. In a single tweet, Trump called to cancel the program. But the F-35 can't be cancelled because its deeply embedded in American politics, military and economy. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

The remarkable discovery of microbial life

869 Views 225 Comments

He was not a trained scientist, but he was insatiably curious. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

2016 Olympics: What Rio doesn’t want the world to see

62 Views 587 Comments

Rio is hiding poor people. See Part II: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c3BRTlHFpBU Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO The 2016 Olympics are set to begin in just over a month in Rio de Janeiro. As the city prepares to receive an influx of international visitors, it is building new infrastructure and transportation systems to accommodate the surge. But the city is also undergoing another major project: hiding and removing poor people from view of foreign onlookers. I went to Rio to see how the city is transforming to make way for the Olympics Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Meet the designer cats with wild blood

870 Views 478 Comments

Bengals, Savannahs, and Toygers, explained. Help us make more ambitious videos by joining the Vox Video Lab. It gets you exclusive perks, like livestream Q&As with all the Vox creators, a badge that levels up over time, and video extras bringing you closer to our work! Learn more at http://bit.ly/video-lab Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. By breeding house cats with wild animals, humans developed hybrid cats that look like little leopards. Bengal cats are a breed that was developed by breeding domestic cats with asian leopard cats. The first American bengal breeder is a woman named Jean Mill, but her work has continued through other breeders. We met one of those breeders, Anthony Hutcherson, when we went to film the cats at the Westminster Dog Show. Besides bengals, we also saw another hybrid breed: savannahs. Instead of asian leopard cats, savannahs were developed by breeding house cats with servals. Unlike the other two breeds, the last breed we met, toygers, are not hybrid cats. Breeder Judy Sugden created the breed by carefully breeding domestic cats with qualities that resemble wild tigers. To learn more about the cats and the breeders that made possible, watch the video above. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

This monster plant is trying to take over. What if we let it?

450 Views 476 Comments

Silicon Valley is home to tech giants, venture capital…and a years-long battle between an invasive species, a tiny bird, and a bunch of scientists trying to decide what counts as “nature.” We put on the biggest boots we could find and headed out to the strange salt flats of the San Francisco bay to check it out. NOTE: All footage of U.S. and California Fish and Wildlife Service land was obtained via special agreement with those agencies. Filming on said land requires a Special Use Permit. Additionally, launching, landing, or operating an unmanned aircraft (drone) from or on lands and waters administered by the California and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services is prohibited unless special permits are obtained. Subscribe: http://bit.ly/2FqJZMl Video: William Poor, Alex Parkin Camera: Vjeran Pavic Audio: Andrew Marino Director of Audience Development: Ruben Salvadori Social Media Manager: Dilpreet Kainth Additional Support: Leo Maco Like Verge Science on Facebook: http://bit.ly/2hoSukO Follow on Twitter: http://bit.ly/2Kr29B9 Follow on Instagram: https://goo.gl/7ZeLvX Read More: http://www.theverge.com Community guidelines: http://bit.ly/2D0hlAv Subscribe to Verge on YouTube for explainers, product reviews, technology news, and more: http://goo.gl/G5RXGs

Physicist Explains One Concept in 5 Levels of Difficulty | WIRED

446 Views 491 Comments

Theoretical physicist Sean Carroll, PhD, is challenged to explain the concept of dimensions to 5 different people; a child, a teen, a college student, a grad student, and an expert. Still haven’t subscribed to WIRED on YouTube? ►► http://wrd.cm/15fP7B7 Get more incredible stories on science and tech with our daily newsletter: https://wrd.cm/DailyYT Also, check out the free WIRED channel on Roku, Apple TV, Amazon Fire TV, and Android TV. Here you can find your favorite WIRED shows and new episodes of our latest hit series Tradecraft. ABOUT WIRED WIRED is where tomorrow is realized. Through thought-provoking stories and videos, WIRED explores the future of business, innovation, and culture. Physicist Explains One Concept in 5 Levels of Difficulty | WIRED

How rats take advantage of human failure

971 Views 839 Comments

Rats are grosser than we thought, but it's not their fault. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO It's estimated that there are over 2 million rats in New York City alone. They often carry infectious diseases like E. Coli and Salmonella and gnaw on infrastructure, causing billions of dollars in damage every year. But is any of this the rat's fault? Rodentologist Bobby Corrigan says that rats can only succeed in the midst of human failure. If we were smarter mammals, better at disposing our trash and taking care of our infrastructure, then we wouldn't have to worry about rats in our cities. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Why Cuban cab drivers earn more than doctors

673 Views 675 Comments

In Cuba, cab drivers are the one percent Help us make more ambitious videos by joining the Vox Video Lab. It gets you exclusive perks, like livestream Q&As with all the Vox creators, a badge that levels up over time, and video extras bringing you closer to our work! Learn more at http://bit.ly/video-lab Cuba’s economy works as a central planning model, where government ministries dole out resources and set everything from prices to inventories to salaries. The fact that a taxi driver can make so much more than a physician is a reflection of the Cuban government’s heavy focus on tourism. For years, the central planning apparatus has valued tourism as a key mechanism for both bringing in revenue as well as propagating the idea that Cuba is thriving. Many pesos are collected by the high prices on everything related to the tourism industry. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

The fight to rethink (and reinvent) nuclear power

840 Views 295 Comments

New nuclear energy technology has come a long way - but can we get over our fears? This is the fifth episode of Climate Lab, a six-part series produced by the University of California in partnership with Vox. Hosted by Emmy-nominated conservation scientist Dr. M. Sanjayan, the videos explore the surprising elements of our lives that contribute to climate change and the groundbreaking work being done to fight back. Featuring conversations with experts, scientists, thought leaders and activists, the series takes what can seem like an overwhelming problem and breaks it down into manageable parts: from clean energy to food waste, religion to smartphones. Sanjayan is an alum of UC Santa Cruz and a Visiting Researcher at UCLA. Prior episodes at https://goo.gl/Htdlkb/ Check back next Wednesday for the final episode. Visit http://climate.universityofcalifornia.edu for more.Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO And check out the University of California’s channels: https://goo.gl/PhoV3G https://goo.gl/Ec2hml /// The University of California is a pioneer on climate research, renewable energy and environmental sustainability. UC is dedicated to providing scalable solutions to help the world bend the curve on climate change. UC research is also paving the way for the university to meet its goal of becoming carbon neutral by 2025. Read more about our commitment at https://goo.gl/z2fN3O Follow UC on Facebook: https://goo.gl/QJZSZK Or on Twitter: https://goo.gl/MKFNcv Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out Vox’s full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyEFollow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5HOr on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

How Fire Ants Took Over America 🔥🔥🔥🔥🔥

359 Views 179 Comments

Viewers like you help make PBS (Thank you ) . Support your local PBS Member Station here: https://to.pbs.org/PBSDSDonate And how we're fighting back! Don't miss our next video! SUBSCRIBE! ►► http://bit.ly/iotbs_sub ↓ More info and sources below ↓ Get yourself an awesome IOTBS shirt! http://dftba.com/besmart Special thanks to Dr. Rob Plowes from the University of Texas at Austin fire ant research lab for letting us come film their ants and phorid flies: http://www.sbs.utexas.edu/fireant/Research%20Program.html If you want to learn everything there is to know about fire ants, read "The Fire Ants" by Walter R. Tschinkel http://amzn.to/1U8jz1S Check your local library! https://www.worldcat.org/title/fire-ants/oclc/64379652 Rachel Carson - "Silent Spring" http://amzn.to/20QwWbM Fire ant raft - Matt Bennett https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FA-e65i3bDs Fire ant escape rafts - Company of biologists https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UxjT99l0mqw ---- Have an idea for an episode or an amazing science question you want answered? Leave a comment or check us out at the links below! Like us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/itsokaytobesmart Follow on Twitter: http://twitter.com/okaytobesmart http://twitter.com/drjoehanson Follow on Tumblr: http://www.itsokaytobesmart.com Follow on Instagram: http://instagram.com/jtotheizzoe Follow on Snapchat: YoDrJoe ----------------- It's Okay To Be Smart is written and hosted by Joe Hanson, Ph.D. Follow me on Twitter: @jtotheizzoe Produced by PBS Digital Studios: http://www.youtube.com/user/pbsdigitalstudios Music via APM Stock images from SciencePhoto http://www.sciencephoto.com/ and Shutterstock http://www.shutterstock.com Stock footage from Videoblocks (unless otherwise noted) http://www.videoblocks.com

How wildlife films warp time

69 Views 33 Comments

Slow motion and timelapse can reveal the wonders of the natural world. Check back next Monday for the next episode in this mini-series. Watch the previous episode here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qAOKOJhzYXk Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO And check out BBC Earth's channels: https://www.youtube.com/user/BBCEarth https://www.youtube.com/user/EarthUnpluggedTV Planet Earth II is airing Saturdays on BBC America. Full episodes will also be streaming the day after they air on BBCAmerica.com for subscribers. http://www.bbcamerica.com/shows/planet-earth-ii/where-to-watch Clips from BBC: Lights hyperlapse (Planet Earth II) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y3RR-59ln6g Amazon water lilly timelapse (Private Life of Plants) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=igkjcuw_n_U Brambles tracking timelapse (Private Life of Plants) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aNjR4rVA8to Worms and sea stars timelapse (Life) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HG17TsgV_qI Great white shark (Planet Earth) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dl7j8AYF9H4 And many more on BBC's mobile app: Sir David Attenborough's Story of Life http://www.bbc.com/earth/storyoflife /// Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Why knights fought snails in medieval art

161 Views 792 Comments

Look in the margins of medieval books and you'll find an unusual theme: knights vs. snails. Follow Phil Edwards and Vox Almanac on Facebook for more: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ Lillian Randall's paper is here: https://www.scribd.com/document/263159779/The-Snail-in-Gothic-Marginal-Warfare And Michael Camille's book about marginal art can be found here: http://www.reaktionbooks.co.uk/display.asp?K=9780948462283 http://press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/distributed/I/bo3536323.html Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Medieval snails and knights — who knew? It turns out that medieval illuminated manuscripts featured a lot of bizarre imagery in the margins, but this pocket of art history might be one of the most intriguing. Scholar Lilian Randall provides the best theory for the unusual motif: these medieval knights fought snails in the margins because snails represented the Lombards, who had become widely despised lenders throughout Europe. Snail was an insult and, over time, it became a type of meme detached from its original meaning. Of course, like much of art history, this theory is just a theory. But it gives us an insight into the rich culture of marginal art and all the complexity, confusion, and amusement that sits on the side of the page. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Why no aquarium has a great white shark

377 Views 133 Comments

Many have tried to keep a white shark in captivity. Here's why that's so difficult. There are several aquariums around the world, including one in Georgia, that house whale sharks, the biggest fish in the sea. But not one has a great white shark on display. Aquariums have made dozens of attempts since the 1970s to display a captive great white shark. Most of those attempts ended with dead sharks. By the 2000s, the only group still trying was the Monterey Bay Aquarium, which spent a decade planning its white shark program. In 2004, it acquired a shark that became the first great white to survive in captivity for more than 16 days. In fact, it was on display for more than six months before it was released back into the ocean. In the following years, the Monterey Bay Aquarium hosted five more juvenile white sharks for temporary stays before ending the program in 2011. It was an expensive effort and had come under criticism due to injuries that some of the sharks developed in the tank. Responding to those critics, Jon Hoech, the aquarium's director of husbandry operations, said: "We believe strongly that putting people face to face with live animals like this is very significant in inspiring ocean conservation and connecting people to the ocean environment. We feel like white sharks face a significant threats out in the wild and our ability to bring awareness to that is significant in terms of encouraging people to become ocean stewards." Check out the video above to learn why white sharks are so difficult to keep in captivity and how the Monterey Bay Aquarium designed a program that could keep them alive. Link to the Biodiversity Heritage Library: https://www.flickr.com/photos/biodivlibrary/albums Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

How dead is the Great Barrier Reef?

954 Views 362 Comments

Coral bleaching is the biggest threat to the Great Barrier Reef. But it's too early for obituaries. Start your Audible 30-day free trial at http://www.audible.com/vox Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Sources: https://www.eposters.net/pdfs/the-2014-2016-global-coral-bleaching-event-preliminary-comparisons-between-thermal-stress-and.pdf http://www.globalcoralbleaching.org/ http://catlinseaviewsurvey.com/gallery https://www.coralcoe.org.au/media-releases/two-thirds-of-great-barrier-reef-hit-by-back-to-back-mass-coral-bleaching https://www.coris.noaa.gov/activities/reef_managers_guide/reef_managers_guide.pdf https://www.nature.com/articles/ncomms12093 http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0114321 https://www.nature.com/articles/srep39666 https://www.flickr.com/search/?user_id=61021753%40N02&view_all=1&text=coral NBC 1970 https://archive.org/details/greatbarrierreef Guillaume Debever https://vimeo.com/82607901 Martin Lalonde https://vimeo.com/119572437 Australia's Great Barrier Reef is the largest coral reef system in the world and the only living structure visible from space. Although ecosystem managers in Australia have worked hard to preserve the reefs, the past couple of decades have brought a new threat that can't be solved by any one country alone: human-induced global warming. Rising ocean temperatures have caused mass coral bleaching in coral reefs around the world, in every tropical ocean from the Caribbean to the South Pacific. This is now considered to be the biggest threat that coral reefs face, and they face many, including overfishing, pollution, storm damage, and invasive species. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

The 1995 Hubble photo that changed astronomy

432 Views 920 Comments

The Hubble Deep Field, explained by the man who made it happen. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO If you hold a pin at arm’s length up in the air, the head of the pin covers approximately the amount of sky that appears in the Hubble Deep Field. The iconic 1995 image is crowded, not because it’s a broad swath of sky but because it’s a broad swath of time. The Hubble Deep Field is more than 12 billion light-years deep. Robert Williams was the director of the Hubble’s science institute back in 1995, and it was his decision to attempt a deep field observation with the telescope. Previous calculations had indicated that Hubble would not be able to detect very distant galaxies, but Williams figured they’d never know unless they tried. His team chose a completely dark part of the sky, in order to see beyond the stars of the Milky Way, and programmed Hubble to stare at that spot for 10 days. It was unusual to use precious observing time to point the telescope at nothing in particular, but that’s what they did. "We didn’t know what was there, and that was the whole purpose of the observation, basically — to get a core sample of the universe," Williams said, borrowing the concept of the "core sample" from the earth sciences. "You do the same thing if you're trying to understand the geology of the Earth: Pick some typical spot to drill down to try to understand exactly what the various layers of the Earth are and what they mean in terms of its geologic history." What makes the Hubble Deep Field an atypical core sample is that rather than observing the material as it is now, the telescope collected images of galaxies as they appeared millions and billions of years ago. Since light can only travel so fast, the telescope is a peephole into the history of the universe. Click here to download the Hubble Deep Field images: http://www.spacetelescope.org/science/deep_fields/ Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

The tiny island in New York City that nobody is allowed to visit

898 Views 947 Comments

There's a tiny island on the East River that you've probably never heard of, and you're not allowed to visit it. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Most people have probably never heard of it but there is a tiny 100 by 200 foot island on the East River in New York City called U Thant Island. It’s right below Roosevelt Island and next to the United Nations headquarters and has more history per square foot than most places in Manhattan. It’s origin dates back to the late 19th century when construction of an underground tunnel produced a tiny mound of rock that was originally named Belmont Island, after August Belmont Jr. who financed the construction project. In the intervening years it was leased by a Buddhist spiritual group, crashed into by numerous vessels, and briefly occupied by a protesting artist.

The hidden oil patterns on bowling lanes

389 Views 658 Comments

Every bowling lane has a hidden oil pattern. In this episode of Vox Almanac, Phil Edwards finds out what that means. Help us make more ambitious videos by joining the Vox Video Lab. It gets you exclusive perks, like livestream Q&As with all the Vox creators, a badge that levels up over time, and video extras bringing you closer to our work! Learn more at http://bit.ly/video-lab Every lane has a pattern. In this episode of Vox Almanac, Phil Edwards explores how they change the game. Bowling isn’t just about a great ball and good form — if you want to understand the sport, you have to understand the lane. Every bowling lane, including the one in your neighborhood alley, is coated with an oil pattern to protect the wood. But these patterns aren’t just for protection — the way in which oil is applied to the lane can affect the speed and direction of your ball. These patterns are so important that recreational bowlers and professional bowlers bowl on vastly different patterns — the Professional Bowlers Association (PBA) even classifies the patterns it uses in tournaments. Phil Edwards met with professional bowler Parker Bohn III at his childhood bowling alley, Howell Lanes in Howell, New Jersey. He guided Phli through the complex strategy a pro bowler uses when encountering different oil patterns. Not only do they have to assess which pattern is in use, but they also have to judge how that pattern changes as the oil shifts and slides over the day. Knowing how to play a specific lane can be the difference between a title and second place. But these patterns aren’t just for the pros — they’re relevant to recreational bowlers as well. Watch the video to see how you can use these patterns to step up your game. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

{{video.$title}}

{{video.$countView}} Views {{video.$comments}} Comments

{{video.$description}}