The bizarre physics of fire ants


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The bizarre physics of fire ants
They're not just an animal, they're a material. And that's got engineers interested. // Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO For more information about the Hu lab: http://www.hu.gatech.edu/ Red imported fire ants (solenopsis invicta) are native to South America and an invasive species in the United States. One of the adaptations that makes them so hardy is that they can build large structures by linking their bodies together. This is how they form rafts that can float during floods. When they're aggregated together, fire ants can be seen as a material and the Hu lab at Georgia Tech has been testing that material for years. /// Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

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Why Are 96,000,000 Black Balls on This Reservoir?

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I took a boat through 96 million black plastic balls on the Los Angeles reservoir to find out why they're there. The first time I heard about shade balls the claim was they reduce evaporation. But it turns out this isn't the reason they were introduced. Huge thanks to LADWP for arranging this special tour for me. Next time let's put the GoPro on the submersible! The balls are made of high density polyethylene (HDPE) which is less dense than water so they float on the surface of the reservoir even if they break apart. They are 10cm (4 inches) in diameter and contain about 210ml of water. So the main reason they are on the reservoir is to block sunlight from entering the water and triggering a chemical reaction that turns harmless bromide into carcinogenic bromate. This effect occurs with prolonged exposure to bromate so regulators insist that levels be kept below 10 microgram per liter on average over a 12 month period. Special thanks to Patreon supporters: Donal Botkin, Michael Krugman, Ron Neal, Stan Presolski, Terrance Shepherd, Penward Rhyme and everyone who provided feedback on an early draft of this video. Thanks to: Las Virgenes Reservoir for footage of initial shade ball dump Euro-Matic for bird into jet-engine footage Researched and Produced by Casey Rentz Animations by Maria Raykova Music from http://epidemicsound.com "Colorful Animation 4" "Seaweed" And from Kevin MacLeod "Marty Gots a Plan" This is an educational video about the science of water quality.

Fastest animals on Earth in slow motion - Animal Camera - BBC

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Want more natural history and wildlife videos? Visit the official BBC Earth channel: http://bit.ly/BBCEarthWW BBC Earth The BBC Earth YouTube channel is home to over 50 years-worth of the best animal videos from the BBC archive. With three new videos released every week there’s something for all nature loves from astounding animal behaviour to beautiful imagery. Click here to find our more: http://bit.ly/BBCEarthWW Learn how the fastest animals on the planet move with the help of some truly awe-inspiring slow motion wildlife camera technology. See the amazing movements of a water balloon when it is popped, a lizard on the attack, and a crab with a fearsome punch. Great animal video from BBC wildlife show Animal Camera. Hosted by Steve Leonard.

See How Termites Inspired a Building That Can Cool Itself | Decoder

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How do you cool a building without air conditioning? Using an approach called biomimicry, see how architect Mick Pearce harnessed the ingenuity of termites to design a natural cooling system for the largest commercial building in Zimbabwe. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe #NationalGeographic #Decoder #Termites About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta In nature, termites build skyscraper-like mounds that are ventilated by a complex system of tunnels. By emulating the ingenuity of termites, Zimbabwean architect Mick Pearce used an approach called biomimicry to design a natural cooling system that harnessed nature. The result is an architectural marvel that achieves 90 percent passive climate control by taking cool air into the building at night and expelling heat throughout the day. In this first installation of the Decoder series, see how the Eastgate Centre in Harare, Zimbabwe utilizes a termite-inspired climate control system. To learn more, read "Termite Climate Control" from the May 2018 issue of National Geographic magazine. See How Termites Inspired a Building That Can Cool Itself | Decoder https://youtu.be/620omdSZzBs National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo

Why Cuban cab drivers earn more than doctors

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In Cuba, cab drivers are the one percent Help us make more ambitious videos by joining the Vox Video Lab. It gets you exclusive perks, like livestream Q&As with all the Vox creators, a badge that levels up over time, and video extras bringing you closer to our work! Learn more at http://bit.ly/video-lab Cuba’s economy works as a central planning model, where government ministries dole out resources and set everything from prices to inventories to salaries. The fact that a taxi driver can make so much more than a physician is a reflection of the Cuban government’s heavy focus on tourism. For years, the central planning apparatus has valued tourism as a key mechanism for both bringing in revenue as well as propagating the idea that Cuba is thriving. Many pesos are collected by the high prices on everything related to the tourism industry. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Proof of evolution that you can find on your body

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You have your mom's smile, your dad's eyes, and the ear muscles of a Triassic mammal. Forty-two percent of Americans say that humans were created in their present form within the past 10,000 years — a percentage that hasn't changed much since 1982, when Gallup started polling views on evolution. Several lines of evidence, from the fossil record, comparative anatomy, and genetics, tell another story. But you don't have to read all the research to find signs of our evolutionary history — you can see it in the vestigial structures in each of our bodies, like the third molars that no longer fit in our mouths. For a few other examples, check out the video above. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Why no aquarium has a great white shark

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Many have tried to keep a white shark in captivity. Here's why that's so difficult. There are several aquariums around the world, including one in Georgia, that house whale sharks, the biggest fish in the sea. But not one has a great white shark on display. Aquariums have made dozens of attempts since the 1970s to display a captive great white shark. Most of those attempts ended with dead sharks. By the 2000s, the only group still trying was the Monterey Bay Aquarium, which spent a decade planning its white shark program. In 2004, it acquired a shark that became the first great white to survive in captivity for more than 16 days. In fact, it was on display for more than six months before it was released back into the ocean. In the following years, the Monterey Bay Aquarium hosted five more juvenile white sharks for temporary stays before ending the program in 2011. It was an expensive effort and had come under criticism due to injuries that some of the sharks developed in the tank. Responding to those critics, Jon Hoech, the aquarium's director of husbandry operations, said: "We believe strongly that putting people face to face with live animals like this is very significant in inspiring ocean conservation and connecting people to the ocean environment. We feel like white sharks face a significant threats out in the wild and our ability to bring awareness to that is significant in terms of encouraging people to become ocean stewards." Check out the video above to learn why white sharks are so difficult to keep in captivity and how the Monterey Bay Aquarium designed a program that could keep them alive. Link to the Biodiversity Heritage Library: https://www.flickr.com/photos/biodivlibrary/albums Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

History’s deadliest colors - J. V. Maranto

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View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/history-s-deadliest-colors-j-v-maranto When radium was first discovered, its luminous green color inspired people to add it into beauty products and jewelry. It wasn’t until much later that we realized that radium’s harmful effects outweighed its visual benefits. Unfortunately, radium isn’t the only pigment that historically seemed harmless or useful but turned out to be deadly. J. V. Maranto details history’s deadliest colors. Lesson by J. V. Maranto, animation by Juan M. Urbina.

How David Blaine barfs frogs

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Blaine's new frog trick isn't magic at all. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

How you could get away with murder in Yellowstone’s “Zone of Death"

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There's a 50 square mile section of land in Idaho where a murderer could get away scot free. Read more here: http://www.vox.com/2014/5/22/5738756/you-can-kill-someone-in-a-section-of-yellowstone-and-get-away-scot Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Why Megalodon (Definitely) Went Extinct

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For more than 10 million years, Megalodon was at the top of its game as the oceans’ apex predator...until 2.6 million years ago, when it went extinct. So, what happened to the largest shark in history? Thanks as always to Nobumichi Tamura for allowing us to use his wonderful paleoart: http://spinops.blogspot.com/ And thanks to Joschua Knüppe and Studio 252mya for the illustration of Piscobalaena. You can find more of Joschua's work here: https://www.deviantart.com/hyrotrioskjan Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Super special thanks to the following Patreon patrons for helping make Eons possible: Katie Fichtner, Anthony Callaghan, Neil H. Gray, Marilyn Wolmart, Esmeralda Rupp-Spangle, Gregory Donovan, Ehit Dinesh Agarwal, سلطان الخليفي, Gabriel Cortez, Marcus Lejon, Anel Salas, Robert Arévalo, Robert Hill, Kelby Reid, Todd Dittman, Betsy Radley, PS, Colin Sylvester, Philip Slingerland, John Vanek, Jose Garcia, Eric Vonk, Tony Wamsley, Henrik Peteri, Jonathan Wright, Jon Monteiro, James Bording, Brad Nicholls, Miles Chaston, Michael McClellan, Jeff Graham, Maria Humphrey, Nathan Paskett, Connor Jensen, Sapjes, Daisuke Goto, Hubert Rady, Yuntao Zhou, Gregory Kintz, Tyson Cleary, Chandler Bass, Maly Lor, Joao Ascensao, Tsee Lee, Sarah Fritts, Ruben Winter, Ron Harvey Jr, Jacob Gerke, Alex Yan If you'd like to support the channel, head over to http://patreon.com/eons and pledge for some cool rewards! Want to follow Eons elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/eonsshow Twitter - https://twitter.com/eonsshow Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/eonsshow/ References: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/John_Barron3/publication/222968661_Late_Neogene_changes_in_diatom_sedimentation_in_the_North_Pacific/links/5afb194a458515c00b6d64bb/Late-Neogene-changes-in-diatom-sedimentation-in-the-North-Pacific.pdf https://www.researchgate.net/publication/312500230_A_well_preserved_skeleton_of_the_fossil_shark_Cosmopolitodus_hastalis_from_the_late_Miocene_of_Peru_featuring_fish_remains_as_fossilized_stomach_contents https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0010552 https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1475-4983.2012.01201.x https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28586693 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27381883 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4541548/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29754903 http://sciencepress.mnhn.fr/sites/default/files/articles/pdf/g2006n2a8.pdf https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27620830 https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/jbi.12754 https://www.nature.com/articles/nature09067 https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0031018216305417 https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0111086 http://science.sciencemag.org/content/327/5968/993 https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0084857 https://www.nature.com/articles/ngeo2813 https://www.researchgate.net/publication/233681377_New_fossil_teeth_of_the_White_Shark_Carcharodon_carcharias_from_the_Early_Pliocene_of_Spain_Implication_for_its_paleoecology_in_the_Mediterranean http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UFE0042397/00001

Anacondas: Tracking Elusive Giants in Brazil

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Legend has it these Amazonian giants drag off children and pets in the night.

The bold plan to end malaria with a gene drive

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How genetically engineered mosquitoes might defeat a disease that kills millions of children. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO The invention of the CRISPR gene editing tool has injected new life into a line of research called gene drive. Gene drives use selfish genetic elements to spread a modification through a wild population. Researchers have proposed using gene drives against agricultural pests and invasive species, but the most urgent application is against vector-borne diseases like malaria, which kills hundreds of thousands of people every year, mostly in sub-Saharan Africa. We talked to the scientists working on this revolutionary approach to disease eradication to find out how it works and how long it might take to deploy a technology like a gene drive against malaria. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

The 1995 Hubble photo that changed astronomy

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The Hubble Deep Field, explained by the man who made it happen. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Click here to download the Hubble Deep Field images: http://www.spacetelescope.org/science/deep_fields/ /// Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

The tiny island in New York City that nobody is allowed to visit

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There's a tiny island on the East River that you've probably never heard of, and you're not allowed to visit it. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Most people have probably never heard of it but there is a tiny 100 by 200 foot island on the East River in New York City called U Thant Island. It’s right below Roosevelt Island and next to the United Nations headquarters and has more history per square foot than most places in Manhattan. It’s origin dates back to the late 19th century when construction of an underground tunnel produced a tiny mound of rock that was originally named Belmont Island, after August Belmont Jr. who financed the construction project. In the intervening years it was leased by a Buddhist spiritual group, crashed into by numerous vessels, and briefly occupied by a protesting artist.

The world is poorly designed. But copying nature helps.

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Biomimicry design, explained with 99% Invisible. Check them out here: https://99percentinvisible.org/ Subscribe to our channel here: http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Japan’s Shinkansen doesn’t look like your typical train. With its long and pointed nose, it can reach top speeds up to 150–200 miles per hour. It didn’t always look like this. Earlier models were rounder and louder, often suffering from the phenomenon of "tunnel boom," where deafening compressed air would rush out of a tunnel after a train rushed in. But a moment of inspiration from engineer and birdwatcher Eiji Nakatsu led the system to be redesigned based on the aerodynamics of three species of birds. Nakatsu’s case is a fascinating example of biomimicry, the design movement pioneered by biologist and writer Janine Benyus. She's a co-founder of the Biomimicry Institute, a non-profit encouraging creators to discover how big challenges in design, engineering, and sustainability have often already been solved through 3.8 billion years of evolution on earth. We just have to go out and find them. This is one of a series of videos we're launching in partnership with 99% Invisible, an awesome podcast about design. 99% Invisible is a member of http://Radiotopia.fm Additional imagery from the Biodiversity Heritage Library: https://www.flickr.com/photos/biodivlibrary/ Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Pigeons are gross. They're also wildly underrated.

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This video will change the way you look at pigeons. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Sources: Superdove: How the Pigeon took Manhattan... and the World http://www.amazon.com/Superdove-Pigeon-Took-Manhattan-World/dp/0061259160 Pigeons: The Fascinating Saga of the World's Most Revered and Reviled Bird http://www.amazon.com/Pigeons-Fascinating-Worlds-Revered-Reviled/dp/0802143288/ref=sr_1_1 Simon de Kruijf https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yHucNka_v64 F Alzheimers https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c7vuU4R9Nj4 Mike McKenzie https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rn55q7zE7Zc NYU Local https://vimeo.com/49680488 B.F. Skinner Foundation https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-cO_UIkJYUacckkE7LPwTA Archive.org https://archive.org/details/Betty_Boop_Training_Pigeons_1936 https://archive.org/details/FB-32 justwalkiniam https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T2_FARacbU0 NTDTV https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zsnUXY2EWXI ocdoves https://www.youtube.com/user/ocdoves Project Sea Hunt http://www.uscg.mil/history/articles/PigeonSARProject.asp MrWizardStudios https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uOkpvEZ-p2k The Tom Lehrer Wisdom Channel https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yhuMLpdnOjY Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Why parrots can talk like humans

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Monkeys are our closest biological relatives, and they can't speak. But parrots don’t seem to have a problem at all. This video is presented by Wix: https://www.wix.com/go/vox Become a Video Lab member! http://bit.ly/video-lab In 2016 researchers released a study with an incredible headline: monkey vocal tracts are speech-ready. It showed that monkeys are held back from speech not by their bodies, but by their brains. But if that’s the case, what’s the deal with birds? Parrots are known for their ability to mimic human speech with incredible accuracy. It’s jarring to hear an animal so vastly different from us speaking our language. So how do they do it? Partially, neurology: parrots are wired for communication in ways other animals (including other birds) are not. But it’s largely physiology. Birds are uniquely equipped to make sounds, and this video will give you a basic overview of how that works. Throughout reporting this piece I had several conversations with Dr. Irene Pepperberg – If you’re interested in the neurology of these birds, I highly recommend checking out her studies on African Grey parrots. I’ve linked to a few of them below: Evidence for Conceptual Quantitative Abilities in the African Grey Parrot: Labeling of Cardinal Sets Acquisition of the same/different concept by an African Grey parrot: Learning with respect to categories of color, shape, and material Number Comprehension by a Grey Parrot (Psittacus erithacus), Including a Zero-Like Concept Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

Thin underwater cables hold the internet. See a map of them all.

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Your internet isn't just underwater. It's also covered in Vaseline. Follow Phil Edwards and Vox Almanac on Facebook for more: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ Map by TeleGeography: http://www.submarinecablemap.com/ Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO The internet is known to pulse through fiber optic cables and cell phone towers, but 99% of high-speed international information is transferred under the sea. How long has this been happening? Underwater cables delivering information isn't a novel idea — the first Transatlantic cable was laid in 1858—undersea cables have been around since the telegraph. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Why cities are full of uncomfortable benches

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That bench won't be yours forever. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO When designing urban spaces, city planners have many competing interests to balance. After all, cities are some of the most diverse places on the planet. They need to be built for a variety of needs. In recent years, these competing interests have surfaced conflict over an unlikely interest: purposefully uncomfortable benches. Enter the New York City MTA. They’ve installed 'leaning bars’ to supplement traditional benches & save platform space. But designs like this carry an often invisible cost: they rob citizens of hospitable public space. And the people who experience this cost most directly are those experiencing homelessness. A few notes of thanks: First to Historian A. Roger Ekirch who kindly got me up to speed on the expansion of streetlights in historic western city districts. Another thanks goes to author Veronica Harnish, who outlined some of the pitfalls that people experiencing homelessness face when choosing between sleeping rough or utilizing emergency shelters. You can read her blog here: http://car-living.blogspot.com/ A third thank you goes to the staff at the Unites States Interagency Council on Homelessness — they supplied the map in this video, as well as some aggregate statistics of the United States homeless population. Those numbers come from a variety of annual ‘Point-In-Time’ counts. The 2018 event will take place in late January, and the process depends on volunteers — so if you'd like to participate, you can find your local organizer here: https://www.hudexchange.info/grantees/find-a-grantee/?state=&program=on&coc=on¶ms=%7B%22limit%22%3A20%2C%22sort%22%3A%22%22%2C%22years%22%3A%5B%5D%2C%22searchTerm%22%3A%22%22%2C%22dir%22%3A%22%22%2C%22grantees%22%3A%5B%5D%2C%22state%22%3A%22%22%2C%22programs%22%3A%5B3%5D%2C%22coc%22%3Atrue%7D##granteeSearch Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Why peregrine falcons are the fastest animals on earth

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Cheetahs are fast, but not faster than a diving peregrine falcon. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO This video features a clip courtesy of Human Planet, a BBC, Discovery Channel and France Television Co-Production. Check out BBC Earth Unplugged's video of "Falcon vs Car": https://youtu.be/iq5DxzTTVgo Peregrine falcons are the fastest animals of the land—and it's no wonder, their bodies are built for speed. While cheetahs can run up to 70 mph on land, peregrine falcons can dive at speed of over 200 mph. That's faster than a 100 mph sneeze and around the same speed as a Formula One racing car. Peregrines are light in weight, aerodynamically shaped, and have robust respiritary systems; all of which allows them to be the fastest birds of prey, and animals in general. Peregrine falcon numbers took a massive hit during much of the 20th century in North America. They became nearly extinct because of pesticides, specifically DDT. The chemical made the falcon's—and many other birds — eggshells thinner, preventing the embryos from developing, in addition to poisoning adult falcons. In 1972, DDT was banned and recovery efforts for peregrine falcons began soon after. By 1999, with concerted effort peregrine falcons saw their numbers increase dramatically and were removed the Endangered Species list. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Why a cat always lands on its feet

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In 1894, a French scientist used a camera to solve a physics problem. Join the Video Lab! http://bit.ly/video-lab Étienne-Jules Marey was a French scientist and inventor who analyzed how things moved. He developed a way to photograph multiple stages of movement onto a single glass plate, a technique called chronophotography. Later, when Kodak introduced celluloid film, Marey swapped the glass plate for a roll of film that moved in between exposures. This technique formed the basis of cinematography, and it’s how he recorded the stages of a cat righting itself in midair. He published his findings in Nature and demonstrated how the cat splits its body in two and uses the inertia of its own body weight to spin around. Darkroom is a new series from Vox producer Coleman Lowndes that digs into stories of the past, one photograph at a time. Watch all the episodes http://bit.ly/321DvzO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

This jet fighter is a disaster, but Congress keeps buying it

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Trump says the F-35 is too expensive and he's not wrong. But this is what he's up against. Sources: 1:09 http://www.mckinsey.com/industries/public-sector/our-insights/defense-offsets-from-contractual-burden-to-competitive-weapon 1:15 https://www.sipri.org/databases/armstransfers 1:49 http://tucson.com/business/tucson/major-raytheon-expansion-could-bring-nearly-jobs-to-tucson/article_9509443f-390a-5c37-8861-9fb45179c5ab.html http://www.dailybreeze.com/article/zz/20130503/NEWS/130509581 http://www.boeing.com/company/general-info/#/employment-data 2:44 http://www.politico.com/story/2015/08/is-lockheed-martin-too-big-too-fail-121203 3:58 http://www.nytimes.com/2001/12/12/business/boeing-s-war-footing-lobbyists-are-its-army-washington-its-battlefield.html http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2002/06/uncle-sam-buys-an-airplane/302509/ 4:24 https://www.f35.com/about/economic-impact 4:44 http://www.businessinsider.com/this-map-explains-the-f-35-fiasco-2014-8 Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Lockheed Martin F-35 is the Pentagon's newest fighter jet. In a single tweet, Trump called to cancel the program. But the F-35 can't be cancelled because its deeply embedded in American politics, military and economy. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Decoding the ancient astronomy of Stonehenge

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The solstice alignments of Stonehenge, explained. Join the Vox Video Lab: http://www.vox.com/join Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Note: A previous version of this video referred imprecisely to "Neolithic Britain" when discussing the Newgrange tomb in Ireland. We have removed that phrasing. My apologies to the Irish. Stonehenge is a popular destination for summer solstice celebrations because the 5,000-year-old monument points toward the summer solstice sunrise on the horizon. However, it also points to the winter solstice sunset in the opposite direction and there's good reason to believe that this may have been the more important alignment for the Neolithic people who built Stonehenge. We investigate by constructing a tiny model of the Stonehenge monument. Sources: https://www.amazon.com/Stonehenge-Understanding-Mysteries-Greatest-Monument-ebook/dp/B00BBF8FLY/ref=sr_1_1 https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00BPEITG2/ref=dp-kindle-redirect?_encoding=UTF8&btkr=1 http://media.astronomicalheritage.net/media/astronomicalheritage.net/entity_000006/ras_stonehenge_factsheet.pdf http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/places/stonehenge/history/# http://www.atmo.arizona.edu/students/courselinks/fall07/nats101s31/lecture_notes/sunpaths.html https://archive.org/details/themysteryofstonehenge Newgrange photos by: Sean MacEntee https://www.flickr.com/photos/smemon/22454487890 Pdbreen https://www.flickr.com/photos/pdbreen/3796235534 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

How Fire Ants Took Over America 🔥🔥🔥🔥🔥

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Viewers like you help make PBS (Thank you ) . Support your local PBS Member Station here: https://to.pbs.org/PBSDSDonate And how we're fighting back! Don't miss our next video! SUBSCRIBE! ►► http://bit.ly/iotbs_sub ↓ More info and sources below ↓ Get yourself an awesome IOTBS shirt! http://dftba.com/besmart Special thanks to Dr. Rob Plowes from the University of Texas at Austin fire ant research lab for letting us come film their ants and phorid flies: http://www.sbs.utexas.edu/fireant/Research%20Program.html If you want to learn everything there is to know about fire ants, read "The Fire Ants" by Walter R. Tschinkel http://amzn.to/1U8jz1S Check your local library! https://www.worldcat.org/title/fire-ants/oclc/64379652 Rachel Carson - "Silent Spring" http://amzn.to/20QwWbM Fire ant raft - Matt Bennett https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FA-e65i3bDs Fire ant escape rafts - Company of biologists https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UxjT99l0mqw ---- Have an idea for an episode or an amazing science question you want answered? Leave a comment or check us out at the links below! Like us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/itsokaytobesmart Follow on Twitter: http://twitter.com/okaytobesmart http://twitter.com/drjoehanson Follow on Tumblr: http://www.itsokaytobesmart.com Follow on Instagram: http://instagram.com/jtotheizzoe Follow on Snapchat: YoDrJoe ----------------- It's Okay To Be Smart is written and hosted by Joe Hanson, Ph.D. Follow me on Twitter: @jtotheizzoe Produced by PBS Digital Studios: http://www.youtube.com/user/pbsdigitalstudios Music via APM Stock images from SciencePhoto http://www.sciencephoto.com/ and Shutterstock http://www.shutterstock.com Stock footage from Videoblocks (unless otherwise noted) http://www.videoblocks.com

The 'duck curve' is solar energy's greatest challenge

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Renewables require change in the energy supply chain. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Electricity is incredibly difficult to store, so grid operators have to generate it at the exact moment it is demanded. In order to do this, they create incredibly accurate models of the total electric loads, that is how much energy will be consumed on a given day. But as utilities started to produce more energy from renewable sources like solar, the models started to shift as well. California researchers discovered a peculiarity in their state’s electric load curves, that started to look more and more like a duck. And that duck shaped chart highlights the greatest challenge to solar energy growth in the US. Vox writer David Roberts has been covering the issue for a few years now. You can read some of his past explainers on the duck curve, and its solutions at the links below: https://www.vox.com/energy-and-environment/2018/3/20/17128478/solar-duck-curve-nrel-researcher https://www.vox.com/2016/2/10/10960848/solar-energy-duck-curve https://www.vox.com/2016/4/8/11376196/california-grid-expansion https://www.vox.com/2016/2/12/10970858/flattening-duck-curve-renewable-energy And if you would like to read some of the source material used in the video above, you can check those out here: https://www.caiso.com/documents/flexibleresourceshelprenewables_fastfacts.pdf https://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy16osti/65023.pdf Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

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