It’s not you. Phones are designed to be addicting.


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It’s not you. Phones are designed to be addicting.
The 3 design elements that make smartphones so hard to put down, explained by Google’s former design ethicist. Check out Christophe's video on how designers find inspiration in nature: http://bit.ly/2DDIQAL Read Ezra Klein's full interview with Tristan Harris: http://bit.ly/2og5v0H Read our interview with Catherine Price: http://bit.ly/2C8gxsT Batch notification research by the Center for Advanced Hindsight, Duke University & Synapse Inc Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Today’s phones are hard to put down. Push notifications buzz in your pocket, red bubbles demand attention, and endless distractions sit at your fingertips. It can feel impossible to pull away from. But that’s kind of the point. When people talk about the “attention economy,” they’re referring to the fact that your time and attention are the currency on which today’s applications make money. Because apps profit off of the total time you spend on their platform, there’s a strong incentive to use psychological tricks to keep you endlessly hooked. But it doesn’t have to be this way. Tristan Harris, who runs Time Well Spent, is working to create a world where platforms can more honestly respect their users’ time. By Design is a new Vox video series about the intersection of design and technology, hosted by Christophe Haubursin. Stay tuned for more, and check out Christophe's most recent work exploring design in our Vox + 99% Invisible collaboration: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLJ8cMiYb3G5fHjUoTiRuJVucCLxYJliQ_ Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

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How Trump's border wall would disrupt nature

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The environmental impact of border walls, explained. Read more about the border wall's effect on wildlife here: http://bit.ly/2GUHzqN When we talk about the consequences of the proposed wall at the border of the US and Mexico, we usually think in terms of people. But along the political divide are rich pockets of biodiversity, with dwindling populations of species that rely on the ability to move back and forth across the border. Under the 2005 REAL ID act, the Department of Homeland Security doesn't have to comply with various environmental laws that might otherwise slow or halt construction in a sensitive area. Laws like the Endangered Species Act, the Clean Water Act, the National Environmental Policy Act or the Migratory Bird Treaty Act — none of those apply to border wall construction. Several parcels of land, including the National Butterfly Center, a state park, and other areas in the federal wildlife refuge system — are still threatened by wall construction. It could still be years before construction starts in some of these areas — but there’s still a lot we don’t know about the full impact of barriers on biodiversity. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO By Design is a new Vox video series about the intersection of design and technology, hosted by Christophe Haubursin. Stay tuned for more, and check out Christophe's most recent work exploring design in our Vox + 99% Invisible collaboration: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLJ8cMiYb3G5fHjUoTiRuJVucCLxYJliQ_ Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

How one typeface took over movie posters

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Why Hollywood kept using Trajan. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO For the past 25 years, one typeface has dominated Hollywood typography: Trajan. It’s everywhere, from Shakespearean epic classics like Titus to gory modern flicks like The Human Centipede. It was even the official typeface of the Academy Awards for a while. In movie poster design, if you want to make a film look official, you use Trajan. So how did that happen? Designer Yves Peters set out to answer that question. Read ScreenFonts, Yves’ monthly movie poster reviews: https://typenetwork.com/news By Design is a Vox video series about the intersection of design and technology. We’re investigating how human decisions on one end of creating something affect people on the other. Watch here: http://bit.ly/2OZTiJ5. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

Why Are 96,000,000 Black Balls on This Reservoir?

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I took a boat through 96 million black plastic balls on the Los Angeles reservoir to find out why they're there. The first time I heard about shade balls the claim was they reduce evaporation. But it turns out this isn't the reason they were introduced. Huge thanks to LADWP for arranging this special tour for me. Next time let's put the GoPro on the submersible! The balls are made of high density polyethylene (HDPE) which is less dense than water so they float on the surface of the reservoir even if they break apart. They are 10cm (4 inches) in diameter and contain about 210ml of water. So the main reason they are on the reservoir is to block sunlight from entering the water and triggering a chemical reaction that turns harmless bromide into carcinogenic bromate. This effect occurs with prolonged exposure to bromate so regulators insist that levels be kept below 10 microgram per liter on average over a 12 month period. Special thanks to Patreon supporters: Donal Botkin, Michael Krugman, Ron Neal, Stan Presolski, Terrance Shepherd, Penward Rhyme and everyone who provided feedback on an early draft of this video. Thanks to: Las Virgenes Reservoir for footage of initial shade ball dump Euro-Matic for bird into jet-engine footage Researched and Produced by Casey Rentz Animations by Maria Raykova Music from http://epidemicsound.com "Colorful Animation 4" "Seaweed" And from Kevin MacLeod "Marty Gots a Plan" This is an educational video about the science of water quality.

The Infinite Hotel Paradox - Jeff Dekofsky

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Sign up for our newsletter and never miss an animation: http://bit.ly/TEDEdNewsletter View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-infinite-hotel-paradox-jeff-dekofsky Want more? Try to solve the buried treasure riddle: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tCeklW2e6_E The Infinite Hotel, a thought experiment created by German mathematician David Hilbert, is a hotel with an infinite number of rooms. Easy to comprehend, right? Wrong. What if it's completely booked but one person wants to check in? What about 40? Or an infinitely full bus of people? Jeff Dekofsky solves these heady lodging issues using Hilbert's paradox. Lesson by Jeff Dekofsky, animation by The Moving Company Animation Studio.

The world is poorly designed. But copying nature helps.

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Biomimicry design, explained with 99% Invisible. Check them out here: https://99percentinvisible.org/ Subscribe to our channel here: http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Japan’s Shinkansen doesn’t look like your typical train. With its long and pointed nose, it can reach top speeds up to 150–200 miles per hour. It didn’t always look like this. Earlier models were rounder and louder, often suffering from the phenomenon of "tunnel boom," where deafening compressed air would rush out of a tunnel after a train rushed in. But a moment of inspiration from engineer and birdwatcher Eiji Nakatsu led the system to be redesigned based on the aerodynamics of three species of birds. Nakatsu’s case is a fascinating example of biomimicry, the design movement pioneered by biologist and writer Janine Benyus. She's a co-founder of the Biomimicry Institute, a non-profit encouraging creators to discover how big challenges in design, engineering, and sustainability have often already been solved through 3.8 billion years of evolution on earth. We just have to go out and find them. This is one of a series of videos we're launching in partnership with 99% Invisible, an awesome podcast about design. 99% Invisible is a member of http://Radiotopia.fm Additional imagery from the Biodiversity Heritage Library: https://www.flickr.com/photos/biodivlibrary/ Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

CNN's exclusive look inside North Korea's schoo...

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In North Korea a university education is free and students are taught from a very young age to abide by the system of government. CNN's Will Ripley reports.

Smartphone detox with minimalist phones

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Our smartphones are distracting and stressful, but they seem necessary. Michael Zelenko tests out four distraction-free phones, ranging from the palm-sized Jelly phone with internet capability to the business card-sized Light Phone that solely makes phone calls. Find out if one of these phones could fit your lifestyle, or if maps and social media apps are too important for you. Note: this video was originally published at 9AM ET and has been reuploaded to correct an exporting error. Subscribe: https://goo.gl/G5RXGs Check out our full video catalog: https://goo.gl/lfcGfq Visit our playlists: https://goo.gl/94XbKx Like The Verge on Facebook: https://goo.gl/2P1aGc Follow on Twitter: https://goo.gl/XTWX61 Follow on Instagram: https://goo.gl/7ZeLvX Read More: http://www.theverge.com

Why cities are full of uncomfortable benches

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That bench won't be yours forever. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO When designing urban spaces, city planners have many competing interests to balance. After all, cities are some of the most diverse places on the planet. They need to be built for a variety of needs. In recent years, these competing interests have surfaced conflict over an unlikely interest: purposefully uncomfortable benches. Enter the New York City MTA. They’ve installed 'leaning bars’ to supplement traditional benches & save platform space. But designs like this carry an often invisible cost: they rob citizens of hospitable public space. And the people who experience this cost most directly are those experiencing homelessness. A few notes of thanks: First to Historian A. Roger Ekirch who kindly got me up to speed on the expansion of streetlights in historic western city districts. Another thanks goes to author Veronica Harnish, who outlined some of the pitfalls that people experiencing homelessness face when choosing between sleeping rough or utilizing emergency shelters. You can read her blog here: http://car-living.blogspot.com/ A third thank you goes to the staff at the Unites States Interagency Council on Homelessness — they supplied the map in this video, as well as some aggregate statistics of the United States homeless population. Those numbers come from a variety of annual ‘Point-In-Time’ counts. The 2018 event will take place in late January, and the process depends on volunteers — so if you'd like to participate, you can find your local organizer here: https://www.hudexchange.info/grantees/find-a-grantee/?state=&program=on&coc=on¶ms=%7B%22limit%22%3A20%2C%22sort%22%3A%22%22%2C%22years%22%3A%5B%5D%2C%22searchTerm%22%3A%22%22%2C%22dir%22%3A%22%22%2C%22grantees%22%3A%5B%5D%2C%22state%22%3A%22%22%2C%22programs%22%3A%5B3%5D%2C%22coc%22%3Atrue%7D##granteeSearch Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

The real secret to sushi isn't fish

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Here's how it rolled from rice paddies into your burrito. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Video by Gina Barton One ingredient has been a staple in sushi for over a thousand years—but it began in southeast Asia as a fish preservation method. Farmers would catch fish in rice paddies during the monsoon season. The caught fish were then pickled by salting the entire fish, packing it with cooked rice and weights, and sealing it in a barrel. This method helped prevent the fish from spoiling and gave the fish umami, the savory flavor. It wasn’t until this preservation method made its way to Japan, during the 8th century, did the rice began to be eaten with the fish. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

How cars went from boxy to curvy

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The big shift from boxy cars in the '80s to curvy cars in the '90s, explained. Read more: http://www.vox.com/2015/6/11/8762373/car-design-curves Magazine archive from: http://oldcarbrochures.org/ Automotive Hall of Fame footage from: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MaOP6dZkFf4 Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

The quest for the perfect apple

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SweeTango, Zestar, Rave, Cosmic Crisp, Evercrisp, Arctic, Kissabel, Envy. These are the names of fancy new apples hoping to satisfy your taste buds. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Farmers are racing to grow and sell the perfect apple, one with the best texture, the best crunch, the best flavor — even an apple that won’t brown. The most innovative apples on the market are patented, trademarked, and have catchy names, logos, and slogans. And consumers have shown they’re willing to pay a premium price for an apple that guarantees a flavor-packed bite. Watch the video above to learn more about why Red Delicious apples have dominated the market for so long (despite less-than-sublime taste) and how it all changed when the Honeycrisp sparked consumer demand for a superior tasting apple. Read more about what makes the Honeycrisp apple so good: https://www.vox.com/culture/2016/10/6/13078268/honeycrisp-apple-explainer-club-apples. The Goods by Vox explains what we buy, why we buy it, and why it matters. Watch the rest of The Goods videos on YouTube: http://bit.ly/2PvjHCB Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Why Japan has so many vending machines

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What vending machines can teach you about this country Subscribe to the Vox Borders newsletter for weekly updates: http://www.vox.com/borders-email Follow Johnny for more photos and videos from his travels around the globe. Facebook: https://goo.gl/l0x5cA Instagram: https://goo.gl/CduwlO While in Japan I noticed vending machines everywhere. Looking into it a little deeper a discovered that there's a very interesting answer to why Japan has so many vending machines. It's an economic story but it's also a story about how Japanese society values robotics and automation. I even found a business card vending machine: https://youtu.be/Ogb7FyzQhbk Vox Borders is a new international series focused on telling the human stories that emerge from lines on the map. Johnny will travel to six border locations to produce a final set of documentaries. While he travels he'll release dispatches on YouTube and Facebook documenting his experiences. Learn more: http://www.vox.com/borders-dispatch Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Sneaky Ways Fast Food Restaurants Get You To Spend Money

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Fast food is supposed to be cheap and convenient, but do you ever find yourself spending more on fast food than you expected to? Fast food is getting more expensive and places like McDonald's, Burger King, and Wendy's are experts at getting you to spend more money. Combos, upgrades, and multiple size options are just a few of the tricks used by fast food restaurants. MORE SNEAKY DEALS CONTENT: Sneaky Ways Trader Joe's Gets You To Spend Money https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iycJkeSwN3o Sneaky Ways Walmart Gets You To Spend Money https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IXuFqBr7QeI Sneaky Ways H&M Gets You To Spend Money https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7wFVuIQSNj8 ------------------------------------------------------ #FastFood #McDonalds #BusinessInsider Business Insider tells you all you need to know about business, finance, tech, retail, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: https://read.bi/7XqUHI BI on Facebook: https://read.bi/2xOcEcj BI on Instagram: https://read.bi/2Q2D29T BI on Twitter: https://read.bi/2xCnzGF BI on Amazon Prime: http://read.bi/PrimeVideo -------------------------------------------------- Sneaky Ways Fast Food Restaurants Get You To Spend Money

How Juul made nicotine go viral

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Juul tried to design a solution to a public health problem. It wound up creating another one. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Read more about Juul on Vox.com: https://www.vox.com/science-and-health/2018/5/1/17286638/juul-vaping-e-cigarette And listen to the Today Explained episode on Juul's marketing practices: https://art19.com/shows/today-explained/episodes/3cfdf464-8619-4ebe-a343-42458870cb77 Since the first patent in 1930, electronic cigarettes have taken many shapes. At first they mimicked the packaging and physicality of cigarettes, with a cylindrical shape and light-up tip. Then they trended toward boxier designs, with low nicotine levels and high amounts of vapor. The Juul did things differently: it packed a high-nicotine, low vapor hit in a small, USB drive-shaped package, with a colorful range of flavors and a buttonless, intuitive design. It wasn't just a hot new e-cigarette — it was a hot new tech gadget. Now, middle schools and high schools across the US are nervous about how many kids are getting hooked on Juuls. By Design is a Vox video series about the intersection of design and technology. We’re investigating how human decisions on one end of creating something affect people on the other. Watch here: http://bit.ly/2OZTiJ5. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

What the names for bodies of water mean

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What do all those bodies of water really mean? In this episode of Vox Almanac, Phil Edwards travels through the map to define bodies of water. Find Phil Edwards on Facebook here: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1 Bodies of water seem simple: but there are a lot of different terms for bodies of water. From well-known terms like ocean, lake, river, and tributary, to more obscure ones like tarn, kettle lake, and firth, these bodies of water shape our world. So put on your geography life jacket and go for a swim in the fantastic world of water. You'll learn about gulfs, arroyos, fjords, oceans, bays, coves, and man other definitions for bodies of water. We can help you understand them — but you have to explore them. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

The wall of eyes trained on the US - Mexico border

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There's more to the border than just a wall. Follow Johnny on Instagram: https://goo.gl/CduwlO and Facebook: https://goo.gl/l0x5cA Subscribe to the Vox Borders newsletter for weekly updates: http://www.vox.com/borders-email This dispatch is from the Rio Grande River, on the Texas side of the U.S. border with Mexico. I embedded with border patrol, to learn about the technology, techniques, and challenges of monitoring a section of the border with over 300 miles of river. Vox Borders is a new international series focused on telling the human stories that emerge from lines on the map. I've traveled to five of six border locations to produce a final set of documentaries. While I travel I'm releasing video dispatches on YouTube and Facebook, documenting my experiences in a vlog that's independent from the final Vox Borders documentaries. Learn more: http://www.vox.com/borders Sources for this story: http://mmp.opr.princeton.edu/results/results-en.aspx https://www.americanimmigrationcouncil.org/research/the-cost-of-immigration-enforcement-and-border-security Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

How free games are designed to make money

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"Freemium" games can end up gaming gamers. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

This jet fighter is a disaster, but Congress keeps buying it

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Trump says the F-35 is too expensive and he's not wrong. But this is what he's up against. Sources: 1:09 http://www.mckinsey.com/industries/public-sector/our-insights/defense-offsets-from-contractual-burden-to-competitive-weapon 1:15 https://www.sipri.org/databases/armstransfers 1:49 http://tucson.com/business/tucson/major-raytheon-expansion-could-bring-nearly-jobs-to-tucson/article_9509443f-390a-5c37-8861-9fb45179c5ab.html http://www.dailybreeze.com/article/zz/20130503/NEWS/130509581 http://www.boeing.com/company/general-info/#/employment-data 2:44 http://www.politico.com/story/2015/08/is-lockheed-martin-too-big-too-fail-121203 3:58 http://www.nytimes.com/2001/12/12/business/boeing-s-war-footing-lobbyists-are-its-army-washington-its-battlefield.html http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2002/06/uncle-sam-buys-an-airplane/302509/ 4:24 https://www.f35.com/about/economic-impact 4:44 http://www.businessinsider.com/this-map-explains-the-f-35-fiasco-2014-8 Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Lockheed Martin F-35 is the Pentagon's newest fighter jet. In a single tweet, Trump called to cancel the program. But the F-35 can't be cancelled because its deeply embedded in American politics, military and economy. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Astronaut ice cream is a lie

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Astronaut ice cream — did it really fly? Vox's Phil Edwards investigates, with the help of the Smithsonian and an astronaut. Follow Phil Edwards and Vox Almanac on Facebook for more: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO For links to key documents, check out the article: http://www.vox.com/2016/2/15/10998344/astronaut-ice-cream Astronaut ice cream, space ice cream, a freeze-dried mistake: whatever you call it, you've probably eaten astronaut ice cream as a kid. But did it really fly? And was it really eaten by astronauts? The Apollo 7 mission is the only time NASA says the sweet stuff flew. So we asked Apollo 7 Lunar Module Pilot Walt Cunnningham if it was true. The answer might surprise you. Space food in general has a fascinating and complicated history, even without the ice cream. Take a look at Neil Armstrong's fruitcake. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Why safe playgrounds aren't great for kids

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There's a case for making playgrounds riskier. This video is presented by Wix, sign up at https://www.wix.com/go/vox Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO The stereotypical modern playground — with its bright colors and rubberized flooring — is designed to be clean, safe, and lawsuit-proof. But that isn't necessarily the best design for kids. US playground designers spent decades figuring out how to minimize risk: reducing heights, softening surfaces, and limiting loose parts. But now, some are experimenting with creating risk. A growing body of research has found that risky outdoor play is a key part of children’s health, promoting social interactions, creativity, problem-solving, and resilience. Some communities are even experimenting with “adventure playgrounds,” a format with origins in World War II Denmark, where bomb sites became impromptu playgrounds. Filled with props like nails, hammers, saws, paint, tires, and wood planks, these spaces look more like junkyards than play spaces — and parents are often kept outside of the playground while children are chaperoned by staff. Now, that question of keeping children safe versus keeping children engaged is at the heart of a big debate in playground design. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

The incredible sport of cup stacking, explained

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Sport stacking, cup stacking, speed stacking — whatever you call it, this sport is mesmerizing to watch. Follow Phil Edwards and Vox Almanac on Facebook for more: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ Thanks to Zhewei Wu. Here's his channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/Purperxo Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Why Hosting The Olympics Isn't Worth It Anymore

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It's no secret that it's a pricey pain to host the Olympic Games, running billions of dollars above the estimated budget. As the International Olympic Committee receives fewer bids with each problematic games, the future of the tradition is looking unsure. We spoke with Smith College Professor of Economics Andrew Zimbalist on the matter. He should know, he's written about the Olympic issues in Circus Maximus, No Boston Olympics, and Rio 2016. -------------------------------------------------- Follow Business Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/businessinsider Follow BI on Facebook: http://bit.ly/1W9Lk0n Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/ -------------------------------------------------- Business Insider is the fastest growing business news site in the US. Our mission: to tell you all you need to know about the big world around you. The BI Video team focuses on technology, strategy and science with an emphasis on unique storytelling and data that appeals to the next generation of leaders – the digital generation.

The 'duck curve' is solar energy's greatest challenge

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Renewables require change in the energy supply chain. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Electricity is incredibly difficult to store, so grid operators have to generate it at the exact moment it is demanded. In order to do this, they create incredibly accurate models of the total electric loads, that is how much energy will be consumed on a given day. But as utilities started to produce more energy from renewable sources like solar, the models started to shift as well. California researchers discovered a peculiarity in their state’s electric load curves, that started to look more and more like a duck. And that duck shaped chart highlights the greatest challenge to solar energy growth in the US. Vox writer David Roberts has been covering the issue for a few years now. You can read some of his past explainers on the duck curve, and its solutions at the links below: https://www.vox.com/energy-and-environment/2018/3/20/17128478/solar-duck-curve-nrel-researcher https://www.vox.com/2016/2/10/10960848/solar-energy-duck-curve https://www.vox.com/2016/4/8/11376196/california-grid-expansion https://www.vox.com/2016/2/12/10970858/flattening-duck-curve-renewable-energy And if you would like to read some of the source material used in the video above, you can check those out here: https://www.caiso.com/documents/flexibleresourceshelprenewables_fastfacts.pdf https://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy16osti/65023.pdf Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

Why Used iPhones Cost More Than Used Android Phones

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Have you ever wondered why used iPhone's cost so much money? Used iPhones like the iPhone 7 or 8 almost always cost more than the same generation of Android phone. Since iPhones receive support and feature updates longer than Android phones they often have a higher resale value. Apple still supports older phones like the iPhone 6s, which will be updated to iOS 13. But older Android phones like the Samsung Galaxy S6 don't get the newest versions of Android. Android phones like Google's Pixel phones or OnePlus phones that receive updates faster usually perform better in the long run. iOS compatibility chart via Statista: https://www.statista.com/chart/5824/ios-iphone-compatibility/ MORE PHONE CONTENT: Lifelong iPhone User Switches To The Galaxy S10 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1r3wbWPIuBw&t=33s Everything Wrong With Lightning Cables | Untangled https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f91K7ardHyY&t=12s Why Does Extra Data Cost Money? | Untangled https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_4TlkRlyfw4 ------------------------------------------------------ #iPhone #Android #TechInsider Tech Insider tells you all you need to know about tech: gadgets, how-to's, gaming, science, digital culture, and more. Visit us at: https://www.businessinsider.com TI on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TI on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tech_insider/ TI on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider TI on Amazon Prime: http://read.bi/PrimeVideo INSIDER on Snapchat: https://insder.co/2KJLtVo Why Used iPhones Cost More Than Used Android Phones

Why cities should plant more trees

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Over 3 million people die annually from air pollution. Planting trees can help lower that number. Read more: http://www.vox.com/energy-and-environment/2016/11/4/13510352/planting-trees-pollution-heat-waves Check out The Nature Conservancy report, "Planting Healthy Air": https://global.nature.org/content/healthyair /// Trees help improve public health by cleaning and cooling the air around them. As the threat of climate change steadily increases, planting trees is a fairly simple way city leaders can help stem the negative consequences of rising temperatures and increasing population density. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

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