The real reason Boeing's new plane crashed twice


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The real reason Boeing's new plane crashed twice
This isn’t just a computer bug. It’s a scandal. Join the Video Lab! http://bit.ly/video-lab Two Boeing airplanes have fallen out of the air and crashed in the past six months. On the surface, this is a technical failure. But the real story is about a company's desire to beat their rival. Read about Boeing's efforts to get the 737 Max reinstated for flight here: https://www.vox.com/2019/4/5/18296646/boeing-737-max-mcas-software-update Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

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The Boeing 787: Broken Dreams l Al Jazeera Investigations

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This is a major project by the Al Jazeera Investigative Unit focusing on the 787 “Dreamliner”, the flagship passenger jet of the Boeing Company. Our journalism reveals the deeply-held safety concerns of current and former Boeing engineers, who in some cases fear to fly on the 787, the plane they build. We uncover allegations of on-the-job drug use, quality control problems and poor workmanship. We explore the roots of the battery problems that led to the plane’s grounding due to safety concerns for three months from January 2013. For more on the investigation, visit http://www.aljazeera.com/boeing787 Senior Producer/Director: Marc Shaffer Producer/Director of Photography/Editor: Colin McIntyre Producer: Kevin Hirten Reporter/Producer: Will Jordan Music Composer: Ryan Whittier Additional Music: Sean Hirten #AlJazeeraInvestigations #Boeing787 #BrokenDreams

Why Was This Plane Invulnerable: The SR-71 Blackbird Story

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The Cold War locked the United States and Soviet Union into a tense struggle for global influence and control. The first purpose-built American spy plane to fly over the Soviet Union was the Lockheed U-2. Neither fast nor stealthy, the U-2’s tactical advantage was that it could supposedly fly above soviet radar and air defenses. Yet even before the U-2 began surveillance missions, there were already plans for the next generation of spy plane. The need for a U-2 successor became more pressing as Soviet radars had tracked the U-2 since the very first reconnaissance flight. In 1960, a Soviet surface to air missile downed a U-2 deep within soviet airspace, heightening tensions between the two Cold War rivals. If America was to continue vital reconnaissance missions over the Soviet Union, it would need an aircraft with a combination of incredible speed, altitude and stealth. In 1959, the CIA chose Lockheed over rival Convair to build the next generation of spy plane. Lockheed’s highly classified spy plane would be known as the A-12. Originally designed for the CIA for reconnaissance, the A-12 was also developed as an interceptor prototype, along with a variant that could launch an unmanned reconnaissance drone. The SR-71 Blackbird, a later variant developed for the Air Force would go on to serve for decades while the other variants were quickly retired. Nearly 60 years after their first flight, the SR-71 and its A-12 successors remain the fastest air breathing jets to ever fly. Lockheed’s engineers had to innovate many aspects of the aircraft from unique engine characteristics, stealth features, to the extensive use of titanium for the first time in an aircraft. For years, the SR-71 Blackbirds were practically invulnerable, being able to outfly and out climb any threat, but by 1980s, Mig-31s and a new of generation of surface to air missiles began to erode the aircraft’s impunity. The SR-71 Blackbirds were finally retired from service in 1998. These reconnaissance aircraft were enormously expensive to operate and politics and infighting for defense budgets eventually had the SR-71s days numbered. Advances in spy satellites, aerial drones and the SR-71’s inability to deliver surveillance data in real time, diminished some of the plane’s utility. #SR71 #Blackbird #SpyPlanes Link to the Mustard Store: www.mustardchannel.com/store Special thanks to Nick Arehart for helping clean up our audio: https://twitter.com/airhrt_ Special thanks to: Coby Tang, Christian Altenhofen, Razvan Caliman, Xan Daven, Joseph Zadeh, Felix Wassmer, and Colin Millions for supporting us on Patreon and helping Mustard grow: https://www.patreon.com/MustardChannel Music (reproduced under license): Intro: "Heartbeat Suspense" - https://www.pond5.com/stock-music/35398806/heartbeat-suspense.html Main Song: "Not Who You Think - Full Track" - https://www.pond5.com/stock-music/79573803/not-who-you-think-full-track.html Extro: "Wake Up Instrumental (80S Film Synth Movie Soundtrack)" - https://www.pond5.com/stock-music/39981638/wake-instrumental-80s-film-synth-movie-soundtrack.html Thanks for watching! Please Like, Comment and Subscribe

The deadly race to the South Pole

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Two exploration teams raced to the South Pole. Only one made it out alive. Correction: A previous version of this video used an outdated British flag. The error has been corrected. We also occasionally referred to the British team as English. In fact, some members of Scott's team were Scottish and Welsh. Help us make our channel more ambitious by joining the Vox Video Lab. Becoming a member brings you closer to our work and gets you exclusive perks, like livestream Q&As with your favorite Vox creators. Learn more at http://bit.ly/video-lab Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Robert Falcon Scott was a British explorer who dreamed of being the first person to reach the South Pole. In 1912, he reached the Pole only to learn that his Norwegian rival, Roald Amundsen, had beat him to it. Caught by freakish weather and a string of bad luck, his entire party died trying to get back. Reasons for his failure range from his use of ponies rather than dogs to a highly unusual temperature drop that made the journey back impossible to survive. Darkroom is a new series from Vox producer Coleman Lowndes that digs into stories of the past, one photograph at a time. Watch all the episodes here: http://bit.ly/321DvzO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

Why no aquarium has a great white shark

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Many have tried to keep a white shark in captivity. Here's why that's so difficult. There are several aquariums around the world, including one in Georgia, that house whale sharks, the biggest fish in the sea. But not one has a great white shark on display. Aquariums have made dozens of attempts since the 1970s to display a captive great white shark. Most of those attempts ended with dead sharks. By the 2000s, the only group still trying was the Monterey Bay Aquarium, which spent a decade planning its white shark program. In 2004, it acquired a shark that became the first great white to survive in captivity for more than 16 days. In fact, it was on display for more than six months before it was released back into the ocean. In the following years, the Monterey Bay Aquarium hosted five more juvenile white sharks for temporary stays before ending the program in 2011. It was an expensive effort and had come under criticism due to injuries that some of the sharks developed in the tank. Responding to those critics, Jon Hoech, the aquarium's director of husbandry operations, said: "We believe strongly that putting people face to face with live animals like this is very significant in inspiring ocean conservation and connecting people to the ocean environment. We feel like white sharks face a significant threats out in the wild and our ability to bring awareness to that is significant in terms of encouraging people to become ocean stewards." Check out the video above to learn why white sharks are so difficult to keep in captivity and how the Monterey Bay Aquarium designed a program that could keep them alive. Link to the Biodiversity Heritage Library: https://www.flickr.com/photos/biodivlibrary/albums Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Boeing 737 MAX : une mise en service trop hâtive?

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Boeing s’est-il précipité dans la mise en service son 737 MAX? Une sortie précipitée qui n'est pas étrangère, selon les analystes, au développement de la C-Series de Bombardier. Qu'est-ce que Boeing a changé sur son 737, pour mieux affronter la compétition, et qui est aujourd'hui remis en question? Le reportage de Jean-Michel Leprince. À lire : https://bit.ly/2TB5F4i

Designing the Perfect Airport Runway

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Be one of the first 73 people to sign up with this link and get 20% off your subscription with Brilliant.org! https://brilliant.org/realengineering/ New vlog channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMet4qY3027v8KjpaDtDx-g Get your Real Engineering merch at: https://standard.tv/collections/real-engineering References: [1] https://www.iata.org/pressroom/pr/Pages/2016-12-08-01.aspx [2] https://www.windfinder.com/windstatistics/dublin [3] http://www.b737.org.uk/limitations.htm [4] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=brX_VhOU3qQ [5] https://www.heathrow.com/noise/heathrow-operations/runway-alternation [6] https://jdasoc.files.wordpress.com/2015/04/pm-edit-jda-crosswind-diagonal-runway-final.pdf [7] https://www.wired.co.uk/article/heathrow-third-runway-plans-expansion [8] Actual Airbus Requirements: https://www.airbus.com/content/dam/corporate-topics/publications/backgrounders/techdata/aircraft_characteristics/Airbus-Commercial-Aircraft-AC-A380-Dec-2016.pdf https://www.statista.com/statistics/564717/airline-industry-passenger-traffic-globally/ Credits: Narrator/Director: Brian McManus Co-Director: Mike Ridolfi (https://www.moboxgraphics.com/) Co-Director: Stephanie Sammann (https://www.stephanie-sammann.com/) Sound: Graham Haerther (https://haerther.net/) Thumbnails: Simon Buckmaster (https://twitter.com/forgottentowel) Editing Laptop: http://amzn.to/2GKXqb7 Camera: http://amzn.to/2oyVNp9 Microphone: http://amzn.to/2HOxVXu Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/user?u=2825050&ty=h Twitter: https://twitter.com/thebrianmcmanus Discord: https://discord.gg/s8BhkmN My Patreon Expense Report: https://goo.gl/ZB7kvK Thank you to my patreon supporters: Adam Flohr, darth patron, Henning Basma, Karl Andersson, Mark Govea, Hank Green, Tony Kuchta, Jason A. Diegmueller, Chris Plays Games, William Leu, Frejden Jarrett, Vincent Mooney, Ian Dundore, John & Becki Johnston. Nevin Spoljaric, Kedar Deshpande

How JetBlue Is Challenging American, United and Delta

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In just two decades, JetBlue Airways became a major mainstream player in the U.S. airline industry. But in 2018, its shares plummeted. To keep up in the big leagues, JetBlue is aggressively trying to raise revenue and keep a lid on costs. JetBlue Airways is looking more like its bigger competitors these days. Plans for the New York-based airline were unveiled in February 1999. JetBlue took its first flight in the winter of 2000, vowing to "bring humanity back to air travel." Now entering its third decade, it is adopting measures used by some more established airlines to drum up revenue and please skeptical investors as its stock price struggles. Increasing baggage fees? Check. Plans for a no-frills coach service? Check. Chasing those lucrative business travelers? Check. Slimming down corporate-office ranks? Check. JetBlue's challenge is holding onto its quirky culture and succeeding at airlines' tough balancing act: keeping investors and passengers happy. "We're exiting that awkward teenage stage and becoming adults," said Joanna Geraghty, JetBlue's president and COO. Despite updates like new planes and cabins, JetBlue wants to hold onto its customer-focused approach that won it a loyal following. "Customers expect good service, and when they don't get it, they're vocal about it," said Geraghty. Armed with a fleet of brand-new Airbus jets, each outfitted with leather seats and individual screens offering satellite television, JetBlue was the brainchild of serial airline entrepreneur David Neeleman. He'splanning to launch a new U.S. airline. JetBlue took its first flight on Feb. 11, 2000, from New York's John F. Kennedy International. The carrier's bet on JFK was a gamble on whether travelers would trek out to an airport more known for international service than for short- and medium-haul flights. "The joke was you could bowl down the runway," said Mark Ahasic, who joined JetBlue a month after its first flight and stayed on for more than six years helping to plan flights and run operations. » Subscribe to CNBC: http://cnb.cx/SubscribeCNBC About CNBC: From 'Wall Street' to 'Main Street' to award winning original documentaries and Reality TV series, CNBC has you covered. Experience special sneak peeks of your favorite shows, exclusive video and more. Connect with CNBC News Online Get the latest news: http://www.cnbc.com/ Follow CNBC on LinkedIn: https://cnb.cx/LinkedInCNBC Follow CNBC News on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBC Follow CNBC News on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBC Follow CNBC News on Google+: http://cnb.cx/PlusCNBC Follow CNBC News on Instagram: http://cnb.cx/InstagramCNBC #CNBC #JetBlue How JetBlue Is Challenging American, United and Delta

This jet fighter is a disaster, but Congress keeps buying it

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Trump says the F-35 is too expensive and he's not wrong. But this is what he's up against. Sources: 1:09 http://www.mckinsey.com/industries/public-sector/our-insights/defense-offsets-from-contractual-burden-to-competitive-weapon 1:15 https://www.sipri.org/databases/armstransfers 1:49 http://tucson.com/business/tucson/major-raytheon-expansion-could-bring-nearly-jobs-to-tucson/article_9509443f-390a-5c37-8861-9fb45179c5ab.html http://www.dailybreeze.com/article/zz/20130503/NEWS/130509581 http://www.boeing.com/company/general-info/#/employment-data 2:44 http://www.politico.com/story/2015/08/is-lockheed-martin-too-big-too-fail-121203 3:58 http://www.nytimes.com/2001/12/12/business/boeing-s-war-footing-lobbyists-are-its-army-washington-its-battlefield.html http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2002/06/uncle-sam-buys-an-airplane/302509/ 4:24 https://www.f35.com/about/economic-impact 4:44 http://www.businessinsider.com/this-map-explains-the-f-35-fiasco-2014-8 Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Lockheed Martin F-35 is the Pentagon's newest fighter jet. In a single tweet, Trump called to cancel the program. But the F-35 can't be cancelled because its deeply embedded in American politics, military and economy. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Why China is building islands in the South China Sea

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China claims they aren't military bases, but their actions say otherwise. Help us make more ambitious videos by joining the Vox Video Lab. It gets you exclusive perks, like livestream Q&As with all the Vox creators, a badge that levels up over time, and video extras bringing you closer to our work! Learn more at http://bit.ly/video-lab China is building islands in the South China sea and its causing disputes among the other nations in the region; Malaysia, the Philippines, Brunei, Vietnam, and Indonesia. The US has many allies in the region and uses its massive Navy to patrol international waters, keeping shipping lanes open for trade To truly understand the international conflicts and trends shaping our world you need a big-picture view. Video journalist Sam Ellis uses maps to tell these stories and chart their effects on foreign policy. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

China's secret internment camps

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...and the internet detectives working to find them. Become a Video Lab member! http://bit.ly/video-lab China has been quietly detaining its population of Uighurs, the country’s Muslim minority, in internment camps. First-hand accounts from inside the camps paint a brutal picture of torture and political indoctrination. At first, China denied the existence of these camps and tried to cover them up. But as a network of academics and activists uncovered evidence of the camps' locations, and the reality of what’s going on inside, China changed its story. Read more about about China’s crackdown on Muslims from Sigal Samuel on Vox: https://www.vox.com/future-perfect/2019/3/30/18287532/china-uighur-muslims-internment-camps-turkey Further reading: China’s brutal crackdown on the Uighur Muslim minority, explained https://www.vox.com/2018/8/15/17684226/uighur-china-camps-united-nations China’s final solution in Xinjiang https://www.hoover.org/research/chinas-final-solution-xinjiang Migration and inequality in Xinjiang https://geog.ucla.edu/sites/default/files/users/fan/403.pdf https://www.wsj.com/articles/SB124811293085765891 Tracking China’s Muslim Gulag https://www.reuters.com/investigates/special-report/muslims-camps-china/ List of re-education camps in Xinjiang https://medium.com/@shawnwzhang/list-of-re-education-camps-in-xinjiang-%E6%96%B0%E7%96%86%E5%86%8D%E6%95%99%E8%82%B2%E9%9B%86%E4%B8%AD%E8%90%A5%E5%88%97%E8%A1%A8-99720372419c Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what’s really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

How 737 MAX 8’s design history could have influenced the Ethiopian Airlines crash

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We look back at the history of the 737 MAX 8 for possible clues in the Ethiopian Airlines crash. Welcome to The National, the flagship nightly newscast of CBC News »»» Subscribe to The National to watch more videos here: https://www.youtube.com/user/CBCTheNational?sub_confirmation=1 Voice Your Opinion & Connect With Us Online: The National Updates on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thenational The National Updates on Twitter: https://twitter.com/CBCTheNational »»» »»» »»» »»» »»» The National is CBC Television's flagship news program. Airing six days a week, the show delivers news, feature documentaries and analysis from some of Canada's leading journalists.

Why Airbus And Boeing Dominate The Sky

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Airbus and Boeing dominate an already under competitive airline manufacturing industry. The duopoly owns the sky by making up 99% of global large aircraft orders and those large plane orders make up more than 90% of the total plane market according to the Teal Group, an aerospace market analysis company (regional jet manufacturers only account for 7% of the airplane market by value). The duopoly doesn’t have many competitors, but overseas competition is brewing. China’s state-run company, COMAC, is poised to make waves in the aviation manufacturing industry, but some say not for a couple decades. This is how Airbus and Boeing took over airplane manufacturing. » Subscribe to CNBC: http://cnb.cx/SubscribeCNBC About CNBC: From 'Wall Street' to 'Main Street' to award winning original documentaries and Reality TV series, CNBC has you covered. Experience special sneak peeks of your favorite shows, exclusive video and more. Connect with CNBC News Online Get the latest news: http://www.cnbc.com/ Follow CNBC on LinkedIn: https://cnb.cx/LinkedInCNBC Follow CNBC News on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBC Follow CNBC News on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBC Follow CNBC News on Google+: http://cnb.cx/PlusCNBC Follow CNBC News on Instagram: http://cnb.cx/InstagramCNBC #CNBC #Airbus #Boeing Why Airbus And Boeing Dominate The Sky

Antonov An-225: ride a colossus | DW English

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The Antonov An-225 is the world's biggest airplane. A colossus - developed in the Soviet Union to carry the Buran Space shuttle. Today it carries other giants such a turbine from Prague, Czech Republic, to a refinery in Perth, Australia ASAP. On board: the crew of Ukrainian Antonov Airlines. And DW reporter Grit Hofmann. Join trip! Read more: http://www.dw.com/en/made-in-germany-the-business-magazine-2016-07-05/e-19333241-9798

Supersonic air travel is finally coming back

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Supersonic air travel is back. 15 years after the Concorde was grounded, everyone from aerospace companies to NASA to small startups is working to bring back ultrafast civilian aircraft. We take a look at the engineering challenges that make supersonic flight so difficult, and try to figure out what’s different about this new generation of planes. Host: Andrew J. Hawkins Video by: Cory Zapatka, William Poor, Sophie Erickson, Alex Perkin Audio: Andrew Marino Executive Producers: Nilay Patel, Eleanor Donovan Director of Audience Development: Ruben Salvadori Social Media Manager: Dilpreet Kainth General Manager: Stephen Belser Network Development: Sarah Bishop Woods The Verge’s sponsors play an important role in funding our journalism, but do not influence editorial content. For more information about our ethics policy, visit https://www.theverge.com/ethics-statement. Subscribe: http://bit.ly/2FqJZMl Like Verge Science on Facebook: http://bit.ly/2hoSukO Follow on Twitter: http://bit.ly/2Kr29B9 Follow on Instagram: https://goo.gl/7ZeLvX Read More: http://www.theverge.com Community guidelines: http://bit.ly/2D0hlAv Subscribe to Verge on YouTube for explainers, product reviews, technology news, and more: http://goo.gl/G5RXGs

Airport Police Arrest Man Onboard Plane | Heathrow: Britain's Busiest Airport | Spark

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As over 7 million people travel through Heathrow airport, the police at heathrow sometimes need to make arrests and this episode has the police looking for an offender onboard an airplane. Content Provided By TVF International. Any queries please contact us at hello@littledotstudios.com Subscribe to Spark for more amazing science, tech and engineering videos - https://goo.gl/LIrlur Follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SparkDocs/ Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/spark_channel/?hl=undefined #heathrowairport #planes #passengerplanes #Planelanding #planeengines #technology #engineering #aircontrolcentre #animalcontrol #boardersecurity

Flying the Boeing 737 Max 8: A pilot’s view from inside the cockpit

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Capt. Dennis Tajer of American Airlines and the Allied Pilots Association explains what it’s like to fly the Boeing 737 Max 8, and why a new flight control system was a surprise to pilots. That system could have played a role in two recent Max 8 crashes. Read more: https://wapo.st/2HGASfo. Subscribe to The Washington Post on YouTube: https://wapo.st/2QOdcqK Follow us: Twitter: https://twitter.com/washingtonpost Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/washingtonpost/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/washingtonpost/

Israeli settlements, explained | Settlements Part I

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The maps that explain the settlers. You can watch a more comprehensive history of the Israel-Palestine here : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iRYZjOuUnlU Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Special thanks for B'Tselem for the use of their mapping data. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

This photo almost started a nuclear war

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The Cuban Missile Crisis began with a photograph. Join the Video Lab! http://bit.ly/video-lab The Cuban Missile Crisis was the closest the world has ever come to all-out nuclear war, and it all started with a photo. On October 15th, 1962, Dino Brugioni, a senior analyst at the newly-formed National Photographic Interpretation Center, identified missile trailers measuring approximately 65 feet in an aerial reconnaissance photo. Those trailers were a match for the Soviet SS-4, a medium-range ballistic missile with a range that would cover a huge amount of the United States, including Washington, DC. Upon seeing this photo, US President John F. Kennedy ordered more aerial recon flights, conducted by the CIA using the high-altitude U-2 spy plane. He used these photographs to make a plan of action about confronting the Soviet Union over their secretive installation of offensive missiles in Cuba. Note: The headline for this video has been updated since publishing. Previous headline: The photo that prevented a nuclear war Darkroom is a series from Vox producer Coleman Lowndes that digs into stories of the past, one photograph at a time. Watch all the episodes here: http://bit.ly/321DvzO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

How a Boeing 727 Was Stolen (And Never Found)

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Watch unlimited documentaries for free for 31 days at http://curiositystream.com/hai Get a Half as Interesting t-shirt: https://standard.tv/collections/half-as-interesting Suggest a video and get a free t-shirt if we use it: http://halfasinteresting.com/suggest Follow Sam from Half as Interesting on Instagram: http://Instagram.com/Sam.From.Wendover Follow Half as Interesting on Twitter: http://twitter.com/halfinteresting Discuss this video on Reddit: http://www.Reddit.com/r/halfasinteresting Check out my other channel: http://youtube.com/wendoverproductions Music by Epidemic Sound

How safe is Boeing's 737 Max 8 aircraft? | Inside Story

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Boeing calls its 737 the most popular jet aircraft of all time. The US plane maker hoped its new 737 MAX 8 would bring in a new era of passenger safety. However, two fatal crashes in five months are raising serious questions. Aviation analysts have noted remarkable similarities between Sunday's Ethiopian Airlines crash, and one involving the same model of aircraft in Indonesia in October. More countries are grounding the planes, and passengers are cancelling their trips. But Boeing and US aviation regulators say there's nothing to worry about. So who's right? And will Sunday's crash affect confidence in modern air travel? Presenter: James Bays Guests: Kyle Bailey - Pilot and former U.S. Federal Aviation Administration Safety Team Representative. Todd Curtis - Former Airline Safety Engineer at Boeing. Matt Driskill - Editor, Asian Aviation Magazine. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/

The Rise and Fall of the A380

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The Airbus A380 is the largest passenger and most expensive airliner in the world. Last week, Airbus announced it will end production of the A380 in 2021. How the once promising Airbus superjumbo went from airline status symbol to reject in just 10 years? Let’s take a look at the rise and fall of the A380 in this special documentary video. For plane spotting, trip reports, daily aviation news and deals update, follow me on social media: Blog: https://samchui.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/samchui/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/SamChuiPhotos Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/samchuiphotos Music by Tunes Beat: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC9Eh2Hhv9poD5rrOqe8HhOw -- The Airbus A380 will hold a special place in many aeroplane enthusiast’s hearts considering its status as the world’s largest passenger airline and its sophisticated, luxurious and spacious first class suites, complete even with an entire bathroom and shower. However, it is undeniable that this aeroplane did not successfully challenge the Boeing 747’s dominance in the long haul flight market, as was Airbus’s aim, and was something of a commercial failure – not only did delays in the development of the model cause much higher than projected development costs, but Airbus have admitted that they are unlikely to be able to recoup the full staggering 25 billion euro price tag on bringing this model to market. This video sheds light on went wrong for this giant of the aeroplane industry, the super jumbo jet. The Airbus A380 was aimed at airlines operating from airports with high levels of aeroplane congestion. With its two deck layout with space enough theoretically for 853 passengers, it seemed like the perfect plane to aim at airlines performing long haul flights with limited timeframes during each day to take off to make for a convenient arrival time at the destination. Perhaps unsurprisingly, the airline Emirates was the biggest purchaser of this model of plane, as it seemed perfect for their business model which has always involved funnelling a large volume of flights through Abu Dhabi airport. However, the 20th century, four engine design made the cost per seat for the airline very high and despite the extra money that customers were willing to pay to travel with increased room and comfort, and the promise by Airbus that these planes would be the answer to the highly time-slot constrained nature of major international airports such as London Heathrow, significant orders from airline giants such as British Airways never materialised. Though the Dubai base of the Emirates airline became a swarm of A380’s, other major international hubs like Paris, Amsterdam and Istanbul were instead thriving on smaller aeroplanes, with Airbus’s smaller A350 emerging as the apparent major future workhorse for these airports. Production of the A380 is set to cease in 2021, after the biggest customer for these super jumbo jets, Emirates, cancelled its most recent order for 39 of them but we can expect to see the Airbus A380 still touching down and taking off well in to the 2030’s, especially as airlines will want to get the most out of these expensive and large aeroplanes, which are not expected to have great second-hand value. The Airbus A380 is evidence that, at least in the aviation industry, bigger is not always better but the aeroplane will still be forever cherished as that great and luxurious whale of the skies.

China is erasing its border with Hong Kong

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The border has an expiration date. Follow Johnny on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/johnnywharris/ Follow the Vox Borders watch page: https://www.facebook.com/VoxBorders/ Become a Video Lab member! http://bit.ly/video-lab Joining the Video Lab is the best way to help us make more of the videos you love, like Vox Borders. And you get access to a ton of perks too! Learn more: http://bit.ly/video-lab With original music by Tom Fox https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCUIM14Vyndaq8MuDeW7BsIg When Britain handed Hong Kong back to China in 1997, Chinese leaders agreed that Hong Kong would be able to keep its economic and political systems, including some of the civil freedoms denied to China’s citizens on the mainland, for the next 50 years. Although Hong Kong still has nearly 30 years of semi-autonomy left, China has started tightening its grip, and many believe it is chipping away at Hong Kong’s freedoms. In this episode, I explore how Hong Kong is dealing with the looming deadline and China’s premature moves. Vox Borders is an international documentary series by Emmy-nominated producer Johnny Harris exploring life at the edge of nations. For more, visit vox.com/borders. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

The Little Plane War

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Build your website for 10% off over at http://squarespace.com/wendover Subscribe to this new channel from Wendover Productions: https://www.youtube.com/halfasinteresting Check out my podcast with Brian from Real Engineering: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/showmakers/id1224583218?mt=2 (iTunes link) https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_10vJJqf2ZK0lWrb5BXAPg (YouTube link) Support Wendover Productions on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/wendoverproductions Get a Wendover Productions t-shirt for $20: https://store.dftba.com/products/wendover-productions-shirt Youtube: http://www.YouTube.com/WendoverProductions Twitter: http://www.Twitter.com/WendoverPro Email: WendoverProductions@gmail.com Reddit: http://Reddit.com/r/WendoverProductions Animation by Josh Sherrington (https://www.youtube.com/heliosphere) Sound by Graham Haerther (http://www.Haerther.net) Thumbnail by Joe Cieplinski (http://joecieplinski.com/) E175 footage courtesy PDX Aviation Boeing footage courtesy Boeing Airbus footage courtesy Airbus Bombardier footage courtesy Bombardier Music: "Wake Up" by Kai Engel and "Bass Vibes Rollin at 5" by Kevin Macleod Big thanks to Patreon supporters: Kevin Song, Kevin Song, David Cichowski, Andy Tran, Victor Zimmer, Paul Jihoon Choi, Dylan Benson, M van Kasbergen, Etienne Dechamps, Adil Abdulla, Arunabh Chattopadhyay, Ieng Chi Hin, Ken Rutabana, John Johnston, Connor J Smith, Rob Harvey, Arkadiy Kulev, Hagai Bloch Gadot, Aitan Magence, Eyal Matsliah, Sihien Goh, Joseph Bull, Marcelo Alves Vieira, Hank Green, Plinio Correa, Brady Bellini

Airplane black boxes, explained

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Sometimes flight recorders are the only way the victims' families will know what happened to the plane. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Immediately following an airplane crash anywhere in US territory, the National Transportation Safety Board dispatches a team of investigators to survey the wreckage, gather information from the airline and from air traffic control, and retrieve the plane's so-called "black boxes." These flight recorders — one stores cockpit audio recordings, the other stores airplane instrument data — are sent to NTSB's lab in Washington, DC, for analysis. There, officials listen to what are sometimes the pilots' final, panicked moments of life. They interpret not only what the pilots were saying before the crash but also any snaps, bangs, and alarms captured by the cockpit area microphone. By combining those audio clues with data from the plane's instruments and sensors, as well as evidence from the scene, investigators can usually determine the cause of the crash, even in cases with no surviving witnesses. /// Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

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