The 1995 Hubble photo that changed astronomy


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The 1995 Hubble photo that changed astronomy
The Hubble Deep Field, explained by the man who made it happen. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO If you hold a pin at arm’s length up in the air, the head of the pin covers approximately the amount of sky that appears in the Hubble Deep Field. The iconic 1995 image is crowded, not because it’s a broad swath of sky but because it’s a broad swath of time. The Hubble Deep Field is more than 12 billion light-years deep. Robert Williams was the director of the Hubble’s science institute back in 1995, and it was his decision to attempt a deep field observation with the telescope. Previous calculations had indicated that Hubble would not be able to detect very distant galaxies, but Williams figured they’d never know unless they tried. His team chose a completely dark part of the sky, in order to see beyond the stars of the Milky Way, and programmed Hubble to stare at that spot for 10 days. It was unusual to use precious observing time to point the telescope at nothing in particular, but that’s what they did. "We didn’t know what was there, and that was the whole purpose of the observation, basically — to get a core sample of the universe," Williams said, borrowing the concept of the "core sample" from the earth sciences. "You do the same thing if you're trying to understand the geology of the Earth: Pick some typical spot to drill down to try to understand exactly what the various layers of the Earth are and what they mean in terms of its geologic history." What makes the Hubble Deep Field an atypical core sample is that rather than observing the material as it is now, the telescope collected images of galaxies as they appeared millions and billions of years ago. Since light can only travel so fast, the telescope is a peephole into the history of the universe. Click here to download the Hubble Deep Field images: http://www.spacetelescope.org/science/deep_fields/ Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

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Why this black hole photo is such a big deal

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What it took to collect these 54-million-year-old photons from a supermassive black hole. Become a Video Lab member! http://bit.ly/video-lab This is an updated version of a video we published in 2016 about the Event Horizon Telescope, an international collaboration to image a black hole for the first time in human history. On April 10, 2019, the team announced their results: They had successfully imaged the supermassive black hole in the center of the galaxy m87, which is nearly 54 million light-years away from us. They were able to achieve unprecedented resolution using very long baseline interferometry, which combines the observations of multiple radio telescopes across the globe. The team wanted to find out whether Einstein's Theory of General Relativity holds up in the extreme environment of black holes, and the results do, in fact, seem to be consistent with the predictions. In the future, we may see more and shaper images of black holes as the team targets smaller wavelengths of light and recruits more telescopes. Eventually, they may include an orbiting space telescope. Vox Observatory takes a magnifying glass to some of life's most interesting questions with a focus on science and technology. Watch other Vox Observatory videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pAoEHR4aW8I&list=PLJ8cMiYb3G5eNMPb_MTRyLDzm_AOIk7UF Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Or our podcasts: https://www.vox.com/podcasts Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Professor Eric Laithwaite: Magnetic River 1975

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The wonders of magnetism and the linear motor are captured in this 1975 presentation by Professor Eric Laithwaite (1921-1997) former Professor of Heavy Electrical Engineering at Imperial College London. For more: http://www2.imperial.ac.uk/blog/videoarchive

The Glass Age, Part 1: Flexible, Bendable Glass

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Be amazed as Adam Savage and Jamie Hyneman introduce us to a whole new way of thinking about glass. Learn the history of glass innovation and watch incredible demonstrations of bendable optical fiber and thin, ultra-flexible glass.This is the Glass Age, where materials science is constantly pushing boundaries and creating new possibilities for glass-enabled technology and design. See how glass is shaping the future at www.TheGlassAge.com Presented by Corning.

The Absurdity of Detecting Gravitational Waves

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A head-vaporizing laser with a perfect wavelength detecting sub-proton space-time ripples. Huge thanks to Prof Rana Adhikari and LIGO: http://ligo.org Here's how he felt when he learned about the first ever detection: https://youtu.be/ViMnGgn87dg Thanks to Patreon supporters: Nathan Hansen, Donal Botkin, Tony Fadell, Saeed Alghamdi, Zach Mueller, Ron Neal Support Veritasium on Patreon: http://bit.ly/VePatreon A lot of videos have covered the general overview of the discovery of gravitational waves, what they are, the history of the search, when they were found but I wanted to delve into the absurd science that made the detection possible. When scientists want one megawatt of laser power, it's not just for fun (though I'm sure it's that too), it's because the fluctuations in the number of photons is proportional to their square root, making more powerful beams less noisy (as a fraction of their total). The smoothest mirrors were created not for aesthetic joy but because when you're trying to measure wiggles that are a fraction the width of a proton, a rough mirror surface simply won't do. Filmed by Daniel Joseph Files Music by Kevin MacLeod, http://www.incompetech.com "Black Vortex" (appropriately named) Music licensed from Epidemic Sound http://epidemicsound.com "Observations 2" (also appropriately named)

Star Crash: The Explosion that Transformed Astronomy

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A startling collision in an ancient galaxy slews Earth's largest telescopes to a spot in the Hydra constellation. Two rapidly spinning neutron stars have violently merged to form a possible black hole. And, for the first time, astronomers see its electromagnetic flash and hear its gravitational thunder as they watch new elements being born. ABOUT US Here at SpaceRip, we value the exploration of the unknown. We surpass boundaries for the sake of uncovering the mysteries of the cosmos and what they may tell us about our origin and our future. With our videos, we hope to educate our viewers on how we fit into the universe, and more so how we can do our part to better it. We believe there is no better time to inform ourselves about the world around us. Our partnership with MagellanTV is aimed to educate viewers on our complex world to prepare for our rapidly changing future. Through our videos we hope to capture a variety of important topics with the overall goal of promoting positive discussion and action. EXPLORE 2000+ VIDEOS NOW Science: https://magellan.tv/explore-science Natural World: https://magellan.tv/explore-naturalworld History: https://magellan.tv/explore-history Human Spirit: https://magellan.tv/explore-humanspirit The Dark Side: https://magellan.tv/explore-thedarkside Narrator: Perry Anne Norton Writer / Director: @DavidSkyBrody Executive Producer: Thomas Lucas

This Genius Invention Could Transform Jet Engines

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Mike McCune is an engineer with Pratt & Whitney, the airplane manufacturer. After 30 years of development, he's created a gearbox for a jet engine that makes them 75% quieter and 15% more fuel efficient. That's a savings of about $1.5 million per airplane each year.

The most mysterious star in the universe | Tabetha Boyajian

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Something massive, with roughly 1,000 times the area of Earth, is blocking the light coming from a distant star known as KIC 8462852, and nobody is quite sure what it is. As astronomer Tabetha Boyajian investigated this perplexing celestial object, a colleague suggested something unusual: Could it be an alien-built megastructure? Such an extraordinary idea would require extraordinary evidence. In this talk, Boyajian gives us a look at how scientists search for and test hypotheses when faced with the unknown. TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more. Find closed captions and translated subtitles in many languages at http://www.ted.com/translate Follow TED news on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/tednews Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/TEDtalksDirector

Star Trek - A Mystery With No Answer

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As Kirk and Sulu are held prisoners, Spock mounts a daring rescue. (Tomorrow Is Yesterday)

The Real Story Behind the Apollo 11 Computer Error | WSJ

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Perhaps the most dramatic moment of Apollo 11's mission to the moon was when the Eagle began its final descent to the lunar surface and the Apollo Guidance Computer became overloaded. Few were more nervous than the young computer programmer who had written the code for the landing. On the Apollo 11's 50th anniversary, WSJ sat down with programmer Don Eyles. Photo: Alexander Hotz/WSJ #WSJ #Apollo #MoonLanding

Thin underwater cables hold the internet. See a map of them all.

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Your internet isn't just underwater. It's also covered in Vaseline. Follow Phil Edwards and Vox Almanac on Facebook for more: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ Map by TeleGeography: http://www.submarinecablemap.com/ Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO The internet is known to pulse through fiber optic cables and cell phone towers, but 99% of high-speed international information is transferred under the sea. How long has this been happening? Underwater cables delivering information isn't a novel idea — the first Transatlantic cable was laid in 1858—undersea cables have been around since the telegraph. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Why ships used this camouflage in World War I

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Dazzle camouflage was fantastically weird. It was also surprisingly smart. WWII saw another kind of strange history unfold: a meme (yes, really). Watch our video on it here: http://bit.ly/2Co9DEu Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Dazzle camouflage was a surprisingly effective defense against torpedoes. In this episode of Vox Almanac, Phil Edwards explains why. World War I ships faced a unique problem. The u-boat was a new threat at the time, and its torpedoes were deadly. That led artist Norman Wilkinson to come up with dazzle camouflage (sometimes called “razzle dazzle camouflage”). The idea was to confuse u-boats about a ship’s course, rather than try to conceal its presence. In doing so, dazzle camouflage could keep torpedoes from hitting the boat — and that and other strategies proved a boon in World War I. This camouflage is unusual, but its striking appearance influenced the culture, inspired cubist painters’ riffs, and even entered into the world of fashion. Though dazzle camouflage lost its utility once radar and other detection techniques took over from u-boat periscopes, for a brief period in time it was an effective and unusual way to help ships stay safe. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

What Are the Chinese Building Underground in Hainan?

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A satellite captures an image that uncovers the entrance to an underground complex. What is being built there? Don't miss new episodes of WHAT ON EARTH? Tuesdays at 9/8c on Science! http://www.sciencechannel.com/tv-shows/what-on-earth/ Subscribe to Science Channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=sciencechannel Check out SCI2 for infinitely awesome science videos. Every day. http://bit.ly/SCI2YT Download the TestTube app: http://testu.be/1ndmmMq

Ancient Aliens: Secrets of the Roswell Rock (Season 9) | History

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Researchers believe there could be a connection between carvings in the Roswell Rock and crop circles in England in this clip from Season 9, Episode 7, "Alien Messages". #AncientAliens Subscribe for more from Ancient Aliens and other great HISTORY shows: http://po.st/SubscribeToHistory Find out more about the show and watch full episodes on our site: http://po.st/AncientAliens Check out exclusive HISTORY content: History Newsletter: http://po.st/HistoryNewsletter Website - http://po.st/HistoryWeb Facebook - http://po.st/HistoryFacebook Twitter - http://po.st/HistoryTwitter "Ancient Aliens" explores the controversial theory that extraterrestrials have visited Earth for millions of years. HISTORY®, now reaching more than 98 million homes, is the leading destination for award-winning original series and specials that connect viewers with history in an informative, immersive, and entertaining manner across all platforms. The network's all-original programming slate features a roster of hit series, epic miniseries, and scripted event programming. Visit us at http://www.HISTORY.com for more info.

What went wrong with ESA's Rosetta-Philae mission to comet 67P Churyumov–Gerasimenko?

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ESA's Rosetta-Philae mission to comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko was a ground-breaking mission in many ways, but not everything went to plan. So what went wrong? https://brilliant.org/astrum/ ************** A big thank you to Brilliant for supporting this video. Sign up for free using the link above. That link will also get the first 200 subscribers 20% off a premium subscription to the website if you like what you see. ************** SUBSCRIBE for more videos about our other planets. Subscribe! http://goo.gl/WX4iMN Facebook! http://goo.gl/uaOlWW Twitter! http://goo.gl/VCfejs Donate! Patreon: http://goo.gl/GGA5xT Ethereum Wallet: 0x5F8cf793962ae8Df4Cba017E7A6159a104744038 Become a Patron today and support my channel! Donate link above. I can't do it without you. Thanks to those who have supported so far! Image Credits: ESA/Rosetta Music Credits: Aerocity - Lost Love Stellardrone - Billions and Billions

The Two People We're All Related To

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Check out Two Cents: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCL8w_A8p8P1HWI3k6PR5Z6w Due to an odd quirk of genetics and some unique evolutionary circumstances, two humans who lived at different times in the distant past managed to pass on a very small fraction of their genomes to you. And to me. To all of us. Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Super special thanks to the following Patreon patrons for helping make Eons possible: Katie Fichtner, Aldo Espinosa Zúñiga, Anthony Callaghan, الخليفي سلطان, Gabriel Cortez, Marcus Lejon, Anel Salas, Robert Arévalo, Robert Hill, Kelby Reid, Todd Dittman, Betsy Radley, Svetlana Pylaeva, Colin Sylvester, Philip Slingerland, John Vanek, Jose Garcia, Noah offitzer, Eric Vonk, Tony Wamsley, Henrik Peteri, Jonathan Wright, Jon Monteiro, James Bording, Brad Nicholls, Miles Chaston, Michael McClellan, Jeff Graham, Maria Humphrey, Nathan Paskett, Connor Jensen, Sapjes, Daisuke Goto, Hubert Rady, Yuntao Zhou, Gregory Kintz, Tyson Cleary, Chandler Bass, Maly Lor, Joao Ascensao. Tsee Lee, Sarah Fritts, Ruben Winter, Ron Harvey Jr, Joshua Mitchell, Johnny Li, Jacob Gerke, Alex Yan If you'd like to support the channel, head over to http://patreon.com/eons and pledge for some cool rewards! Want to follow Eons elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/eonsshow Twitter - https://twitter.com/eonsshow Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/eonsshow/ References: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3334592/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3267120/ https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/f4ee/6bfac21f39ac51fc306ba3100c2ebd2ee61a.pdf https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5892150/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4032117/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5500864/ http://haplogroup-a.com/Ancient-Root-AJHG2013.pdf https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5418327/ http://ase.tufts.edu/chemistry/hhmi/documents/Protocols/Maternal%20Ancestry_Introduction_Reworked_Aug_25_2011.pdf http://pages.ucsd.edu/~dkjordan/resources/clarifications/MitochondrialEve.html https://www.cell.com/action/showPdf?pii=S0960-9822%2813%2900215-7 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4367903/ https://www.cell.com/action/showPdf?pii=S0002-9297%2809%2900163-3 https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg22429904-500-found-closest-link-to-eve-our-universal-ancestor/ https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/no-mitochondrial-eve-not-first-female-species-180959593/ https://www.nature.com/news/genetic-adam-and-eve-did-not-live-too-far-apart-in-time-1.13478 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5525259/ https://www.hhmi.org/biointeractive/evolution-y-chromosome http://www.pnas.org/content/106/38/16018 https://www.nature.com/articles/jhg2012154 https://academic.oup.com/mbe/article/27/8/1833/988857 https://www.nature.com/articles/325031a0 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2694979/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4381518/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28086175

Why danger symbols can’t last forever

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How to design fear, explained with 99% Invisible. Check them out here: http://99pi.org Correction: The correct spelling of “warning” in Persian is هشدار. Watch the previous episode from this series: http://bit.ly/2DDIQAL Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Chances are you wouldn’t be able to recognize a biohazard even if you were looking right at one. But the biohazard symbol? It’s pretty easy to spot. Most warning icons rely on previously established objects or symbols: a general caution might use an exclamation point, and a fire warning might use an illustration of a flame. But the biohazard symbol references an idea that is much harder to picture — and in the 50 years since its invention, it has become one of the most recognizable icons on the planet. But can the meaning of a symbol like this last an eternity? A special Department of Energy project is trying to figure that out. Read more: https://goo.gl/U82Ehn This video was made in partnership with 99% Invisible, a podcast about all the thought that goes into the things we don’t think about, hosted by Roman Mars. You can find full episodes at http://99pi.org Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

NASA's incredible mission to Pluto, explained

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A tiny spacecraft has been traveling 9 years for this moment — the day we finally get a close look at Pluto. Here's what you need to know about NASA's New Horizon's mission. Learn more: http://www.vox.com/2015/7/9/8921713/pluto-mission-new-horizons-nasa-flyby Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Pigeons are gross. They're also wildly underrated.

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This video will change the way you look at pigeons. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Sources: Superdove: How the Pigeon took Manhattan... and the World http://www.amazon.com/Superdove-Pigeon-Took-Manhattan-World/dp/0061259160 Pigeons: The Fascinating Saga of the World's Most Revered and Reviled Bird http://www.amazon.com/Pigeons-Fascinating-Worlds-Revered-Reviled/dp/0802143288/ref=sr_1_1 Simon de Kruijf https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yHucNka_v64 F Alzheimers https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c7vuU4R9Nj4 Mike McKenzie https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rn55q7zE7Zc NYU Local https://vimeo.com/49680488 B.F. Skinner Foundation https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-cO_UIkJYUacckkE7LPwTA Archive.org https://archive.org/details/Betty_Boop_Training_Pigeons_1936 https://archive.org/details/FB-32 justwalkiniam https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T2_FARacbU0 NTDTV https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zsnUXY2EWXI ocdoves https://www.youtube.com/user/ocdoves Project Sea Hunt http://www.uscg.mil/history/articles/PigeonSARProject.asp MrWizardStudios https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uOkpvEZ-p2k The Tom Lehrer Wisdom Channel https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yhuMLpdnOjY Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

How the Mona Lisa became so overrated

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It's not just the smile. There are a few real reasons Mona is so famous. Vox's Phil Edwards looked into it... Follow Phil Edwards and Vox Almanac on Facebook for more: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/ Read the full article for citations and details here: http://www.vox.com/2016/9/20/12941736/mona-lisa-famous Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

James Webb Space Telescope Launch and Deployment

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Northrop Grumman is proud to lead the industry team building NASA's James Webb Space Telescope. This revolutionary observatory is the largest telescope built for space and the most powerful infrared telescope ever made. It is the scientific successor to the Hubble Space Telescope. The Webb telescope will travel 1 million miles from earth and look back over 13.5 billion years, providing images of the first galaxies formed and observing unexplored planets around distant stars. The breakthrough technology developed for the Webb Telescope will expand our understanding of the universe, rewrite textbooks and inspire a future generation of engineers and scientists. This animation captures Webb’s journey into orbit, 1 million miles away from earth, depicting the sequence of events surrounding the launch and deployment of this game changing observatory. The travel time, distance and transformation of the telescope as it deploys are included in this sequence. Learn more at: http://www.northropgrumman.com/Capabilities/AutonomousSystems/Pages/default.aspx #NorthropGrumman #AutonomousSystems

The Extraordinary Hubble Space Telescope

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How did the Hubble Space Telescope revolutionise astronomy and surpass all expectations? DCODE how it has guaranteed new discoveries about the universe, in this fascinating 2016 series - Space’s Deepest Secrets.

Airplane black boxes, explained

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Sometimes flight recorders are the only way the victims' families will know what happened to the plane. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Immediately following an airplane crash anywhere in US territory, the National Transportation Safety Board dispatches a team of investigators to survey the wreckage, gather information from the airline and from air traffic control, and retrieve the plane's so-called "black boxes." These flight recorders — one stores cockpit audio recordings, the other stores airplane instrument data — are sent to NTSB's lab in Washington, DC, for analysis. There, officials listen to what are sometimes the pilots' final, panicked moments of life. They interpret not only what the pilots were saying before the crash but also any snaps, bangs, and alarms captured by the cockpit area microphone. By combining those audio clues with data from the plane's instruments and sensors, as well as evidence from the scene, investigators can usually determine the cause of the crash, even in cases with no surviving witnesses. /// Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Decoding the ancient astronomy of Stonehenge

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The solstice alignments of Stonehenge, explained. Join the Vox Video Lab: http://www.vox.com/join Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Note: A previous version of this video referred imprecisely to "Neolithic Britain" when discussing the Newgrange tomb in Ireland. We have removed that phrasing. My apologies to the Irish. Stonehenge is a popular destination for summer solstice celebrations because the 5,000-year-old monument points toward the summer solstice sunrise on the horizon. However, it also points to the winter solstice sunset in the opposite direction and there's good reason to believe that this may have been the more important alignment for the Neolithic people who built Stonehenge. We investigate by constructing a tiny model of the Stonehenge monument. Sources: https://www.amazon.com/Stonehenge-Understanding-Mysteries-Greatest-Monument-ebook/dp/B00BBF8FLY/ref=sr_1_1 https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00BPEITG2/ref=dp-kindle-redirect?_encoding=UTF8&btkr=1 http://media.astronomicalheritage.net/media/astronomicalheritage.net/entity_000006/ras_stonehenge_factsheet.pdf http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/places/stonehenge/history/# http://www.atmo.arizona.edu/students/courselinks/fall07/nats101s31/lecture_notes/sunpaths.html https://archive.org/details/themysteryofstonehenge Newgrange photos by: Sean MacEntee https://www.flickr.com/photos/smemon/22454487890 Pdbreen https://www.flickr.com/photos/pdbreen/3796235534 Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Why graphene hasn’t taken over the world...yet

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Graphene is a form of carbon that could bring us bulletproof armor and space elevators, improve medicine, and make the internet run faster — some day. For the past 15 years, consumers have been hearing about this wonder material and all the ways it could change everything. Is it really almost here, or is it another promise that is perpetually just one more breakthrough away? Director: Cory Zapatka Producer: William Poor Graphics: Alex Parkin Reporter: Angela Chen Sound Mix: Andrew Marino Additional Camera: Christian Mazza, Phil Esposito Director of Audience Development: Ruben Salvadori Social Media Manager: Dilpreet Kainth Subscribe: http://bit.ly/2FqJZMl Like Verge Science on Facebook: http://bit.ly/2hoSukO Follow on Twitter: http://bit.ly/2Kr29B9 Follow on Instagram: https://goo.gl/7ZeLvX Read More: http://www.theverge.com Community guidelines: http://bit.ly/2D0hlAv Subscribe to Verge on YouTube for explainers, product reviews, technology news, and more: http://goo.gl/G5RXGs

Seeing Beyond - The James Webb Space Telescope

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The Webb Space Telescope is NASA's next great orbiting observatory and the Hubble Space Telescope's successor. This video, narrated by "Deep Astronomy" host Tony Darnell, draws the line between the two telescopes, explaining how Webb will build upon and continue Hubble's work exploring the universe. http://hubblesite.org/explore_astronomy/deep_astronomy/episodes/1

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