The most feared song in jazz, explained


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The most feared song in jazz, explained
Making sense of John Coltrane's "Giant Steps." Follow Vox Earworm on Facebook for more: http://www.facebook.com/VoxEarworm And be sure to check out Earworm's complete first season here: http://bit.ly/2QCwhMH John Coltrane, one of jazz history’s most revered saxophonists, released “Giant Steps” in 1959. It’s known across the jazz world as one of the most challenging compositions to improvise over for two reasons - it’s fast and it’s in three keys. Braxton Cook and Adam Neely give me a crash course in music theory to help me understand this notoriously difficult song, and I’m bringing you along for the ride. Even if you don’t understand a lick of music theory, you’ll likely walk away with an appreciation for this musical puzzle. Braxton Cook: https://www.braxtoncook.com/ Adam Neely: https://www.youtube.com/adamneely Note: The headline for this video has been updated since publishing. Previous headline: Jazz Deconstructed: John Coltrane's "Giant Steps" Some songs don't just stick in your head, they change the music world forever. Join Estelle Caswell on a musical journey to discover the stories behind your favorite songs. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

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The secret rhythm behind Radiohead's "Videotape"

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Watch the full first season of Vox Earworm: https://bit.ly/2JKK30W And follow Vox Earworm on Facebook for more: http://www.facebook.com/VoxEarworm In this season opener of Earworm, I speak with Warren Lain. He's a Radiohead fan who also happens to be an incredibly talented musician and music teacher. In December 2016 he uploaded a 38 minute video to YouTube about a Radiohead song that I deeply love, "Videotape." He had been thinking about the music theory behind this seemingly simple song for the better part of a decade. The reason? “Videotape”, a slow rhythmically monotonous song, is actually syncopated. I’m joined also by Erin Barra, a professor at Berklee College of Music, who helped Warren and I explain this musical illusion. Warren’s video can be found right here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RvKhtFXPswk Some songs don't just stick in your head, they change the music world forever. Join Estelle Caswell on a musical journey to discover the stories behind your favorite songs. Check out the entire Vox Earworm playlist here: http://bit.ly/2QCwhMH Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

How a recording-studio mishap shaped '80s music

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Warning: This is an unapologetic ode to gated reverb drums Here's a Spotify playlist of some of the best gated reverb songs: http://spoti.fi/2vH7ZZL Over the past few years a general nostalgia for the 1980s has infiltrated music, film, and television. I deeply love those gated reverb drums of the '80s - you know that punchy percussive sound popularized by Phil Collins and Prince? So for my second episode of Vox Pop’s Earworm I spoke with two Berklee College of Music professors, Susan Rogers and Prince Charles Alexander, to figure out just how that sound came to be, what makes it so damn punchy, and why it’s back.  Correction: At 2:01, a previous version of the video mistakenly said the noise gate only lets frequencies above a certain threshold pass through. We should’ve said “amplitudes” instead of “frequencies.” The error has been rectified. At 3:45 we noted that plate reverb boxes were made using aluminum. In fact, they were usually made of steel. Further reading: http://www.musicradar.com/news/drums/classic-drum-sounds-in-the-air-tonight-590970 Some songs don't just stick in your head, they change the music world forever. Join Estelle Caswell on a musical journey to discover the stories behind your favorite songs. Check out the entire Vox Earworm playlist here: http://bit.ly/2QCwhMH And follow Vox Earworm on Facebook for more: http://www.facebook.com/VoxEarworm Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

We measured pop music’s falsetto obsession

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From Justin Timberlake to the Bee Gees, we charted the popularity of men singing high. Become a Video Lab member! http://bit.ly/video-lab It’s nearly impossible to turn on the radio and not hear a male artist singing really high. Likely he’s a tenor, and more often than not he’ll sing in falsetto. Think Justin Bieber, The Weeknd, Bruno Mars, Drake, Charlie Puth, Shawn Mendes, Adam Levine, Sam Smith ... the list goes on and on and on. This isn’t a trend — it has been the status quo for decades. Using the data diving know-how of The Pudding, and drawing on the expertise of Anthony Roth Costanzo, a professional opera singer, I dig into the world of the high male vocal range by tracking how pervasive it really is across the decades. The Pudding: https://pudding.cool/ IG: @the.pudding Twitter: @puddingviz The articles referenced in the video can be found here: The Evolution of the Male Falsetto: https://frieze.com/article/evolution-male-falsetto What does it mean when The Weeknd hits a high note: https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/style/what-does-it-mean-when-the-weeknd-hits-a-high-note/2016/12/01/4969c506-b65b-11e6-959c-172c82123976_story.html?noredirect=on Active Child, Prince, and the Science of the Male Falsetto: https://pitchfork.com/thepitch/794-active-child-prince-and-the-science-of-the-male-falsetto/ Why Are There So Many Tough Guys Who Sound Like Ladies On The Radio?: https://www.npr.org/2016/02/15/466404515/why-are-there-so-many-tough-guys-who-sound-like-ladies-on-the-radio Here's a Spotify list of 65+ songs that have some pretty fun falsetto moments: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/0nUxhLp94vGOARoCJKkV0k?si=sGtRcGPtQ_-Dktcc5H_Thg And here’s the same Pandora playlist: https://www.pandora.com/playlist/PL:1688849921711361:7344 And a list of all of the songs featured in this video by timestamp: 1:04 - Want to Want Me - Jason Derulo 1:09 - Sugar - Maroon 5 1:18 - Sorry - Justin Bieber 1:30 - Can’t Feel My Face - The Weeknd 1:32 - What Do You Mean - Justin Bieber 1:36 - The Hills - The Weeknd 1:42 - Hello - Adele 3:33 - Sleep, Baby, Sleep - George P Watson 3:47 - Ill Wind - Radiohead 5:37 - Redbone - Childish Gambino 6:10 - Rock of Ages - Def Leppard 7:10 - Get Lucky - Daft Punk 7:21 - Crocodile Rock - Elton John 8:23 - Killer Queen - Queen 8:55 - I Knew I loved You - Savage Garden 9:28 - Stayin’ Alive - Bee Gees 9:50 - Falsetto - The-Dream 10:17 - Cry Me A River - Justin Timberlake 11:52 - Sweet Child O’ Mine - Guns N’ Roses 11:55 - Two Hearts - Phil Collins 12:01 - Rocket 2 U - The Jets 12:19 - Smooth Criminal - Michael Jackson 12:28 - Nite and Day - Al B. Sure 12:33 - You Should Be Dancing - Bee Gees 14:33- Me And Those Dreaming Eyes of Mine - D’Angelo 14:44 - So In Love - Curtis Mayfield 15:38 - Sherry - Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons 15:48 - Natural - Bloodstone 16:00 - Starboy - The Weeknd Earworm is a series where Estelle Caswell takes you on a musical journey to discover the stories and sounds behind your favorite songs. More videos can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLJ8cMiYb3G5fyqfIwGjH2fYC5fFLfdwW4 Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

The ingredients of a classic house track

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With a disco sample and drum machine house music took over the globe . Become a Video Lab member! http://bit.ly/video-lab House has become one of the most popular forms of electronic music since its inception in the late 80’s. It began in Chicago, when local DJ’s and music producers experimented with remixing disco vocals over hard hitting drum machines. They would soon play a huge role in popularizing the sound and distinguishing house music as a global music genre. Chicago gospel singer, Loleatta Halloway, is one of the most widely sampled artists in house music history. Her song “Love Sensation” has been sampled nearly 300 times, including on Black Box’s “Ride on Time”, the notorious hit that became the best selling single in the U.K in 1989. Special thanks to James Wiltshire and Torsten Schmidt for offering their expertise in this video. Links to them are below: James Wiltshire: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aSFQIlnB_1k Torsten Schmidt: https://daily.redbullmusicacademy.com/author/torsten-schmidt There are countless histories on house music across the internet, the ones listed below proved tremendously helpful in putting this video together. Red Bull Music Academy, TR-909 and House music https://daily.redbullmusicacademy.com/2016/09/instrumental-instruments-909 Time to Jack: Chip E on the Birth of Chicago House https://daily.redbullmusicacademy.com/2019/01/chip-e-interview Frankie Knuckles on the Birth of House Music | Red Bull Music Academy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OM0fga9HdIE The Chicago Record Store That Popularized House https://daily.redbullmusicacademy.com/2016/11/importes-etc-feature When Techno Was House https://daily.redbullmusicacademy.com/2017/08/chicago-house-detroit-techno-feature Collection of WBMX radio show playlists https://www.gridface.com/ How Loleatta Holloway Became Disco’s Most Sampled Artist https://www.electronicbeats.net/how-loleatta-holloway-became-discos-most-sampled-artist/ I was there when house music took over the world https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Rah1F1zq1k Note: The headline for this video has been updated since publishing. Previous headline: How Chicago built house music from the ashes of disco Follow Vox Earworm on Facebook for more: http://www.facebook.com/VoxEarworm Some songs don't just stick in your head, they change the music world forever. Join Estelle Caswell on a musical journey to discover the stories behind your favorite songs. And be sure to check out Earworm's complete first season here: http://bit.ly/2QCwhMH Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

How J Dilla humanized his MPC3000

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J Dilla made his MPC3000 musical. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO There's a halo of reverence around J Dilla, a producer and beatmaker from Detroit who made some of the most fascinating and influential beats in hip hop history. Before his early death in 2006, J Dilla worked with countless artists and producers - from Erykah Badu and Janet Jackson to Busta Rhymes and Madlib - and developed an off-kilter style of rhythm and sampling that transcended the machine he used to create music, the Akai Midi Production Center, otherwise known as the MPC. Spotify Playlist created by Okayplayer: https://open.spotify.com/user/okayplayer87/playlist/0Xd9a6zJMMYLURcINKVkQd Brian "Raydar" Ellis' music: https://soundcloud.com/raydarellis Further reading: Compiled list of Dilla samples: https://dilladata.wordpress.com/ Redbull Music Academy: http://www.redbullmusicacademy.com/lectures/questlove-new-york-2013 Don't Cry breakdown: https://tinysubversions.com/essays/dontcry/ Why J Dilla May Be Jazz's Latest Great Innovator via NPR: https://www.npr.org/sections/ablogsupreme/2013/02/07/171349007/why-j-dilla-may-be-jazzs-latest-great-innovator Waajeed breaks down Dilla samples: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCpigwriKVfrYf-_90KMHFIA History of the MPC: https://reverb.com/news/a-brief-history-of-the-akai-mpc Some songs don't just stick in your head, they change the music world forever. Join Estelle Caswell on a musical journey to discover the stories behind your favorite songs. Check out the entire Vox Earworm playlist here: http://bit.ly/2QCwhMH And follow Vox Earworm on Facebook for more: http://www.facebook.com/VoxEarworm Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

How the triplet flow took over rap

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The “Migos flow” deconstructed. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO In 2013, Migos made it to the Billboard Charts with "Versace." It was a viral hit and it put the spot light on a very unique rap flow - the triplet. The triplet, often now called the "Migos flow" happens when three syllables are rapped over one beat. It's now so popular that nearly every mainstream rap artists these days has used it, often to great effect. Kendrick rapped in triplets on one of the most dramatic moments of his latest album, Damn. and Chance the Rapper used triplets on the opening track of Coloring Book. This video is about where the triplet flow came from and how it's been a common tool for rappers since Three 6 Mafia and Bone Thugs-N-Harmony's debut albums in the '90s. Spotify Playlist here: https://open.spotify.com/user/estellecaswell/playlist/3g2vztPl93ILo0JXATi2Ou Further reading Complex: http://www.complex.com/music/2014/03/quavo-is-the-most-influential-rapper-of-2014 Genius: https://genius.com/Queenofcoplaints-is-it-the-migos-flow-tracing-the-use-of-triplet-flows-in-hip-hop-lyrics Special thanks to Justin Hunte and Martin Connor. You can find their stuff here Justin: https://www.youtube.com/thecompanyman Martin: https://www.rapanalysis.com/ Some songs don't just stick in your head, they change the music world forever. Join Estelle Caswell on a musical journey to discover the stories behind your favorite songs. Check out the entire Vox Earworm playlist here: http://bit.ly/2QCwhMH And follow Vox Earworm on Facebook for more: http://www.facebook.com/VoxEarworm Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

The golf ball that made golfers too good

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Golf's distance debate, explained. Become a Video Lab member! http://bit.ly/video-lab These days, pro golfers are hitting the ball far. Really far. And it's creating a problem: because modern golfers can reach the hole with fewer shots than before, older courses -- like Augusta National Golf Club, Oakmont Country Club, and others -- are becoming obsolete. Now, professional organizations, like the United States Golf Association, are struggling to find a solution for big powerful golfers like Dustin Johnson, Bubba Watson, and Tiger Woods. While the jump in distance is due to lots of factors, conversation is centering on the controversial possibility of redesigning the golf ball to reduce distance. It'd be the latest turn in the ball's long history: Golf balls have evolved from "featheries," to gutties, to balata balls, and eventually dimpled modern balls. But the biggest, and most recent change? The almost-instantaneous switch from wound balls to solid core multilayer balls like the Titleist Pro V1. A previous version of this video contained an audio glitch at 2:35. The error has been corrected. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Or our podcasts: https://www.vox.com/podcasts Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Why this awful sounding album is a masterpiece

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Brace yourselves, this video is about Trout Mask Replica by Captain Beefheart and his Magic Band. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Trout Mask Replica, by Captain Beefheart and his Magic Band was inducted into the Library of Congress' national recording registry in 2010 - nearly 40 years after it's release. The album has been widely cited by artists of all kinds as a shining point of creativity and original thought - it also is very very hard to listen to. It's the musical equivalent of a Jackson Pollock painting. Its discordant rhythms and motifs sound made up on the spot by a child, but every sound and riff you hear on the album was arduously rehearsed over the course of a year by a group of young musicians who were remarkable in their own right. Samuel Andreyev and Susan Rogers join me on Episode #6 of Vox Pop's Earworm to breakdown why this album is such a masterpiece. Samuel Andreyev's Frownland analysis: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-FhhB9teHqU Interviews with John French and Bill Harkleroad: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VWgfVVbK4bA&t=1955s https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Od0_LRNlE5A Articles and Sources: http://www.beefheart.com/ The Artist Formerly Known as Captain Beefheart: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ObNDoR36v0E Guardian: https://www.theguardian.com/music/2006/aug/04/popandrock.shopping1 Rolling Stone: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/albumreviews/trout-mask-replica-19690726 Some songs don't just stick in your head, they change the music world forever. Join Estelle Caswell on a musical journey to discover the stories behind your favorite songs. Check out the entire Vox Earworm playlist here: http://bit.ly/2QCwhMH And follow Vox Earworm on Facebook for more: http://www.facebook.com/VoxEarworm Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

The sound that connects Stravinsky to Bruno Mars

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It’s an 1980s pop music cliche that dates back to 1910. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO If you listen to the first few seconds of Bruno Mars’ “Finesse” (hint: listen to the Cardi B remix) you’ll hear a sound that immediately creates a sense of 80s hip-hop nostalgia. Yes, Cardi B’s flow is very Roxanne Shante, but the sound that drives that nostalgia home isn’t actually from the 1980s. Robert Fink and the inventor of the Fairlight CMI, Peter Vogel, help me tell the story of the orchestra hit - a sound that was first heard in 1910 at the Paris Opera where the famed 20th century Russian composer Stravinsky debuted his first hit, The Firebird. The video above is, in short, a history of the original orchestra hit sample from The Firebird Suite to the 1982 hit “Planet Rock” to “Finesse.” And as a treat, here’s a playlist of way more songs with orchestra hits than you probably wanted.   Playlist: https://open.spotify.com/user/estellecaswell/playlist/53plZYDXbG2GooieYDV7fs?si=PnXiBWLjRnWLTO46hY-F_A Fairlight CMI app: Peter Vogel CMI by Peter Vogel Instruments Pty Ltdhttps://itunes.apple.com/us/app/peter-vogel-cmi/id420212505?mt=8 Robert Fink's paper: https://www.jstor.org/stable/3877522?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents Some songs don't just stick in your head, they change the music world forever. Join Estelle Caswell on a musical journey to discover the stories behind your favorite songs. Check out the entire Vox Earworm playlist here: http://bit.ly/2QCwhMH And follow Vox Earworm on Facebook for more: http://www.facebook.com/VoxEarworm Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

Soloing On Giant Steps Made Easy! Coltrane Changes Demystified

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In this episode I will show you how to make soloing over John Coltrane's Giant Steps Easy! Links To Follow: If you are interested in purchasing The Beato Book please email me at rickbeato1@gmail.com If you would like to donate to my channel to support my video creation you can use my PayPal address rickbeato1@gmail.com Skype Lessons are available on a limited basis. If you are interested please write me at rickbeato1@gmail.com YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/c/RickBeato Artist Facebook -https://www.facebook.com/rickbeatoproduction/ Personal Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/rick.beato.1 Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/rickbeato1/ Follow On Twitter - @rickbeato www.nuryl.com www.rickbeato.com

Musician Explains One Concept in 5 Levels of Difficulty ft. Jacob Collier & Herbie Hancock | WIRED

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23-year-old musician, composer and multi-instrumentalist Jacob Collier explains the concept of harmony to 5 different people; a child, a teen, a college student, a professional, and jazz legend Herbie Hancock. Still haven’t subscribed to WIRED on YouTube? ►► http://wrd.cm/15fP7B7 Also, check out the free WIRED channel on Roku, Apple TV, Amazon Fire TV, and Android TV. Here you can find your favorite WIRED shows and new episodes of our latest hit series Tradecraft. ABOUT WIRED WIRED is where tomorrow is realized. Through thought-provoking stories and videos, WIRED explores the future of business, innovation, and culture. Musician Explains One Concept in 5 Levels of Difficulty ft. Jacob Collier & Herbie Hancock | WIRED

How Leonardo da Vinci made a "satellite" map in 1502

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It was a feat of technological and symbolic imagination. And it was pretty accurate, too. Join the Video Lab to see Phil's Q&A! http://bit.ly/video-lab Leonardo da Vinci’s known for his art and inventions — but also his groundbreaking maps, like this one of Imola, Italy. In this episode of Vox Almanac, Vox’s Phil Edwards explores how it was made. Further reading: 1) John Pinto’s History of the Ichnographic City Plan is useful to understand the history of these maps. 2) Check out Portraying the City in Early Modern Europe: Measurement, Representation, and Planning by Hilary Ballon and David Friedman for more info. 3) If you want to dig deeper into early maps, Jessica Maier’s Mapping Past and Present: Leonardo Bufalini’s Plan of Rome is fascinating. Please email Phil if you have trouble finding any of these papers. Drafting 1502’s equivalent to a “satellite” map was a massive undertaking, and Leonardo managed to pull it off. His early map helped Italian politcian Cesare Borgia construct an idea of the town of Imola that was far more accurate than most contemporary maps. Through the use of careful measurements of angles and pacing out distances using a primitive odometer, Leonardo managed to create a map that was very close to accurate. This map — an “ichnographic” map — was a step forward in portraying how maps could work to represent geography. Though it’s marked with some inaccuracies, it’s stunningly precise for the time and pushed forward the art of mapmaking. Leonardo’s Imola remains, even today, a remarkably useful guide to the city. In Vox Almanac, Senior Producer Phil Edwards explains the world through history's footnotes. Watch all of Vox Almanac here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4dgzJQsAXfI&list=PLJ8cMiYb3G5dDYkBwaRB-0rp6GJ5vnMTe Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

Piano class: Giant Steps

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This video is part of a collection of videos which Frans Elsen recorded during workshops that Barry Harris gave at the Royal Conservatory in The Hague between 1989 and 1998. Frans Elsen was a very important Dutch pianist, arranger and educator of Jazz. He and Barry shared a mutual appreciation of each others music and were close friends. This material has been edited and selected by Frans himself. It gives a unique insight in Barry's wonderful ways of teaching and his extraordinary musicianship. Please visit http://www.franselsen.com for info about Frans Elsen and his musical legacy. There is a special reference to these videos on that website. These videos are an important historical document of one of Jazz music's finest and foremost musicians and educators.

How smooth jazz took over the ‘90s

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You should give smooth jazz a chance. Follow Vox Earworm on Facebook for more: http://www.facebook.com/VoxEarworm Smooth jazz has gotten a bad rap for decades. It’s often associated with background music for elevators or the soundtrack at the dentist office. Smooth jazz is less a genre of music than a highly researched radio format and, although it’s heyday was in the 1990s and it’s mostly associated with Kenny G, its origins go back the mid 1960s when a select few jazz musicians crossed over to pop music and had music purists riling. Artists like Grover Washington Jr. and George Benson took the style to new heights and created the sound that we all know and love….to hate. How to listen to smooth jazz Spotify playlist: https://open.spotify.com/user/estellecaswell/playlist/44owC0MViG9hE1QNLjChzl?si=jku8eQ39Qji-DngzkLP_eA Some songs don't just stick in your head, they change the music world forever. Join Estelle Caswell on a musical journey to discover the stories behind your favorite songs. Check out the entire Vox Earworm playlist here: http://bit.ly/2QCwhMH Note: The headline for this video has been updated since publishing. Previous headline: How smooth jazz took over the ‘90s Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Or our podcasts: https://www.vox.com/podcasts Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

What Made Bach Great? Johann Sebastian Bach 1685-1750 (edit)

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In this episode we explore the life and music of Johann Sebastian Bach 1685-1750. Photography in Leipzig by Fabian Pape THE BEATO CLUB → https://flatfiv.co/pages/become-a-beato-club-member BUY THE BEATO BOOK HERE → http://bit.ly/2uTQFlo Follow my Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/rickbeato1/ **Advanced Harmonic Concepts for Composition and Improvisation Video Course** → www.flatfiv.co SUBSCRIBE HERE → http://bit.ly/2eEs9gX BEATO MUSIC FORUM → forum.rickbeato.com —————————————————————————————————————— My Links to Follow: YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/c/RickBeato Personal Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/rick.beato.1 Follow On Twitter - @rickbeato —————————————————————————————— Special Thanks to My Supporters: Brett Bottomley Christian Abuan Zack Kirkorian Orion Letizi Andrew Boyd Mike Voloshen Ashley Thompson Matt Pauley Nickola Pazderic jonathan taylor Peter Pillitteri Chris Defendorf Peter Moore Jeremy Hickerson Alex Paclin Travis Ahrenholtz Sam Slotnick Harry Watson Eric Bourassa John Null Neil LaHurd Morgan King Steve Greenberg Scott Tyburski Chris Mitchell Kenny Jaworski Michael Seim Todd Geisler Charles Bull Roger Frankham Dave Hawkey Terrance Bessey Jesse West Eric Waisman Craig Sayer Michael Akraka Scott Rance Mansel Ismay Blayne Brocious Paul Noonan Frederick Humphrey JP Rosato Otabek Salamov Jean Belanger Eddie Garcia Mayank Sanganeria Maydad Meiri Philip Lobb Dennis Tomlinson Terry Morin Ray Rossetti Dan Sullivan Marc Alan David Dodini David Horvath Ghostly Beard Ryan Sullivan Phantomas Trehr Jason Hendricks Rip Winkler Andrew Boyd Will Elrics

The greatest album covers of jazz

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Blue Note captured the refined sophistication of jazz during the early 60s, giving it its signature look in the process. Follow Vox Earworm on Facebook for more: http://www.facebook.com/VoxEarworm When asked to visualize what jazz looks like, you might picture bold typography, two tone photography, and minimal graphic design. If you did, you’re recalling the work of a jazz label that single-handedly defined the “look” of jazz music in the 1950s and1960s: Blue Note. Inspired by the ever present Swiss lettering style that defined 20th century graphic design (think Paul Rand), Blue Note captured the refined sophistication of jazz during the early 60s, particularly during the hard bop era, and gave it a definitive visual identity through album covers. Some songs don't just stick in your head, they change the music world forever. Join Estelle Caswell on a musical journey to discover the stories behind your favorite songs. Check out the entire Vox Earworm playlist here: http://bit.ly/2QCwhMH Note: The headline for this video has been updated since publishing. Previous headline: How one designer created the "look" of Jazz Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

How To Write Chord Progressions With NEGATIVE HARMONY [Simple Explanation]

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http://musictheoryforguitar.com Negative Harmony is a very simple concept that has been made unnecessarily complex. You may have heard about Negative Harmony (after all, it was all the rage on YouTube a while ago) and maybe you tried to understand it. But for all the talk about it, there are still very few resources that actually explain it! Most people came away with the idea that Negative Harmony is an abstract or brainy concept reserved to geniuses. In reality, everybody can use Negative Harmony in their music - it's not difficult to do as long as you can play a few chords on your guitar. You can find everything else in the video below. In this video you will learn what Negative Harmony is, how it works, and how you can use it in your music. I play plenty of examples so you can hear how it sounds, and see how to use it in practice. By the time you get to the end of the video you will be able to apply Negative Harmony to create new chord progressions that sound great COMPLETE CHORD MASTERY COURSE: https://www.musictheoryforguitar.com/chords-and-harmony-guitar-lessons.html If you like this video, share, like, comment & don't forget to subscribe for more content! Need help with music theory for guitar? Check out these FREE resources: https://www.musictheoryforguitar.com/guitar-music-theory-free-resources.html FOLLOW ME: YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/musictheoryforguitar Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MusicTheoryForGuitar Twitter: https://twitter.com/theoryguitar Website: http://musictheoryforguitar.com

Aretha Franklin’s musical genius in 2 songs

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Two songs that show off Aretha Franklin’s gospel roots. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Aretha Franklin will always be the Queen of Soul. In the 1960s songs like “Respect” became the symbol for political and social change. It’s likely the reason her music moved so many people wasn’t necessarily the lyrics, but the way she delivered them. Aretha was raised in the church, and her life and music was rooted in gospel music. You can hear this so clearly in her live performances and covers, where every musical decision she made was in the moment. Listen to any one of Aretha’s songs and you’ll understand the power of gospel music, but her live performance of “Dr. Feelgood” and her cover of “Son of a preacher man” are a great place to start. Special thanks to Brigitta Johnson, Robert Darden, and Raymond Wise for sharing their expertise in gospel music history. Note: The title of this video has been updated. It was previously "The gospel according to Aretha Franklin." Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H

The surprising pattern behind color names around the world

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Why so many languages invented words for colors in the same order. Help us make more ambitious videos by joining the Vox Video Lab. It gets you exclusive perks, like livestream Q&As with all the Vox creators, a badge that levels up over time, and video extras bringing you closer to our work! Learn more at http://bit.ly/video-lab In 1969, two Berkeley researchers, Paul Kay and Brent Berlin, published a book on a pretty groundbreaking idea: that every culture in history, when they developed their languages, invented words for colors in the exact same order. They claimed to know this based off of a simple color identification test, where 20 respondents identified 330 colored chips by name. If a language had six words, they were always black, white, red, green, yellow, and blue. If it had four terms, they were always black, white, red, and then either green or yellow. If it had only three, they were always black, white, and red , and so on. The theory was revolutionary — and it shaped our understanding of how color terminologies emerge. Read more on the research mentioned in this video: Cook, Kay, and Regier on the World Color Survey: goo.gl/MTUi9C Stephen C. Levinson on Yele color terms: goo.gl/CYDfvw John A. Lucy on Hanunó'o color terms: goo.gl/okcyC3 Loreto, Mukherjee, and Tria on color naming population simulations: goo.gl/rALO1S To learn more about how your language's color words can affect the way you think, check out this video lecture: goo.gl/WxYi1q Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Why 'Bohemian Rhapsody' Is The Best Song Ever Written | The Art Of Film

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When the band Queen released its most popular song, "Bohemian Rhapsody," it changed the face of music. So what makes the 6 minute pop single so great? Special thanks to Irwin Fisch, NYU Steinhardt Professor ------------------------------------------------------ #Queen #BohemianRhapsody #Insider INSIDER is great journalism about what passionate people actually want to know. That’s everything from news to food, celebrity to science, politics to sports and all the rest. It’s smart. It’s fearless. It’s fun. We push the boundaries of digital storytelling. Our mission is to inform and inspire. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: https://insder.co/2NCg6Sg INSIDER on Facebook: https://insder.co/2NyYczE INSIDER on Instagram: https://insder.co/2xN5qFB INSIDER on Twitter: https://insder.co/2xyN5wE INSIDER on Snapchat: https://insder.co/2KJLtVo Why 'Bohemian Rhapsody' Is The Best Song Ever Written | The Art Of Film

4 Levels of Spaghetti & Meatballs: Amateur to Food Scientist | Epicurious

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We challenged chefs of three different levels - an amateur, a home cook and a professional chef - to make their versions of spaghetti & meatballs. And then we brought in a food scientist to review their work. Which one was the best? Check out the professional's recipe here on the ICE blog: https://www.ice.edu/blog/pro-chef-spaghetti-and-meatballs-recipe Still haven’t subscribed to Epicurious on YouTube? ►► http://bit.ly/epiyoutubesub ABOUT EPICURIOUS Browse thousands of recipes and videos from Bon Appétit, Gourmet, and more. Find inventive cooking ideas, ingredients, and restaurant menus from the world’s largest food archive. 4 Levels of Spaghetti & Meatballs: Amateur to Food Scientist | Epicurious

The Circle of Fifths - How to Actually Use It

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Support me on Patreon: http://patreon.com/michaelnew The circle of fifths is easy to learn, but what to do with it can be confusing. I'll show you a quick way to memorize it, and then ways to use it for things like chord building and key changes. Also check out the follow up lesson about using the circle of fifths with minor keys: https://youtu.be/hzgDTocKyc4

Building a border at 4,600 meters

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How China and Nepal are taming the Himalaya mountains. Follow Johnny to stay up to date on Vox Borders: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/johnnywharris Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/johnnyharrisvox Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Read more about the concept of non-state spaces: https://goo.gl/UsgDDy Vox Borders Episodes: 1. Haiti and the Dominican Republic ( https://youtu.be/4WvKeYuwifc) 2. The Arctic & Russia (https://youtu.be/Wx_2SVm9Jgo) 3. Japan & North Korea (https://youtu.be/qBfyIQbxXPs) 4. Mexico & Guatemala (https://youtu.be/1xbt0ACMbiA) 5. Nepal & The Himalaya (https://youtu.be/ECch2g1_6PQ) 6. Spain & Morocco (https://youtu.be/LY_Yiu2U2Ts) For thousands of years, humans have drawn lines on the earth, dividing the planet into nations. But there are some parts of the world that no empire, nation or state has been able to tame. In this episode of Borders, Johnny heads deep into the Himalaya mountains to learn about how people have lived away from the concept of borders. China and Nepal are acting fast to develop this remote region and it's having major effects on the local population. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Rapping, deconstructed: The best rhymers of all time

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Here's how some of the greatest rappers make rhymes. Help us make more ambitious videos by joining the Vox Video Lab. It gets you exclusive perks, like livestream Q&As with all the Vox creators, a badge that levels up over time, and video extras bringing you closer to our work! Learn more at http://bit.ly/video-lab SPOTIFY PLAYLIST: https://open.spotify.com/user/estellecaswell/playlist/5KpHR1UysAms2zssDHeSbZ Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

The world is poorly designed. But copying nature helps.

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Biomimicry design, explained with 99% Invisible. Check them out here: https://99percentinvisible.org/ Subscribe to our channel here: http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Japan’s Shinkansen doesn’t look like your typical train. With its long and pointed nose, it can reach top speeds up to 150–200 miles per hour. It didn’t always look like this. Earlier models were rounder and louder, often suffering from the phenomenon of "tunnel boom," where deafening compressed air would rush out of a tunnel after a train rushed in. But a moment of inspiration from engineer and birdwatcher Eiji Nakatsu led the system to be redesigned based on the aerodynamics of three species of birds. Nakatsu’s case is a fascinating example of biomimicry, the design movement pioneered by biologist and writer Janine Benyus. She's a co-founder of the Biomimicry Institute, a non-profit encouraging creators to discover how big challenges in design, engineering, and sustainability have often already been solved through 3.8 billion years of evolution on earth. We just have to go out and find them. This is one of a series of videos we're launching in partnership with 99% Invisible, an awesome podcast about design. 99% Invisible is a member of http://Radiotopia.fm Additional imagery from the Biodiversity Heritage Library: https://www.flickr.com/photos/biodivlibrary/ Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

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